Archive for the ‘EarlyWord’ Category

YA/MG May GalleyChat

Tuesday, May 19th, 2015

This session of YA GalleyChat has now ended. Join us for the next one on June 16, 5 to 6 p.m. EDT (4:30 for virtual cocktails).

Note our brand-new hashtag, #ewgcya (the old one is now definitely NSFW)

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

BEA-Insertion-Banner

Click on the image above.

Below are newly added items:

May 11 — Sign up for LJ’s BEA Galley Guide here

May 1 — PW ‘s list of Adult Galleys to Grab
and Can’t Miss Kids’ Galleys.

A limited number of FREE show passes available to qualified library staff from Unshelved. Link here.

Chat with Ellen Airgood

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015
 Live Chat with Ellen Airgood - THE EDUCATION OF IVY BLAKE(05/06/2015) 
4:53
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Welcome, everyone.

In a few minutes, we will begin our chat with Ellen Airgood, the author of The Education of Ivy Blake, which will be published by Nancy Paulsen Books, a division of Penguin Young Readers on June 9.

The Education of Ivy Blake is a companion to her previous title, Prairie Evers. In that book, Prairie moves from North Carolina to New Paltz, in upstate New York. Her accent, her name, and the fact that she was previously home schooled make her feel like an outsider. Happily she meets another outsider, Ivy Blake and they become fast friends.

Prairie comes from a loving family and Ivy does not. When Ivy's single mom decides to move to another town, Prairie’s family convinces her to let Ivy finish out the school year with them.

The Education of Ivy Blake shifts focus to Ivy and picks up when she rejoins her mother.

In a starred review, School Library Journal says. “Like Anne of Green Gables and many other neglected creative girls before her, Ivy is irresistible, and readers will be rooting for her all the way.”

This is Ellen’s third book. Her first, a novel for adults, South of Superior, was published in 2011.

Wednesday May 6, 2015 4:53 Nora, EarlyWord
4:55
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Hey, great to see you, Ellen. We'll start in a few minutes!

Wednesday May 6, 2015 4:55 Nora, EarlyWord
4:55
Ellen Airgood: 
Great to be here, Nora!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 4:55 Ellen Airgood
4:57
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Unfortunately, Lisa Von Drasek isn’t be able to moderate today’s chat, so I am sitting in for her.

Wednesday May 6, 2015 4:57 Nora, EarlyWord
5:00
Nora, EarlyWord: 

We've already got some greeting for you from participants, Ellen, so I will start posting them. First of all, Lisa is out there and says


Hello! Thank you Ellen for being here,

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:00 Nora, EarlyWord
5:00
[Comment From JoAnn from NMJoAnn from NM: ] 
Hi Ellen!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:00 JoAnn from NM
5:00
Ellen Airgood: 
Hello, Lisa! It's lovely to meet you in this way. Thanks for the wonderful questions you sent.

And Hello to JoAnn as well!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:00 Ellen Airgood
5:01
[Comment From PamelaPamela: ] 
Love both books.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:01 Pamela
5:01
[Comment From JaniceJanice: ] 
Thanks for this, Ellen and even more so, the BOOKS!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:01 Janice
5:01
[Comment From School LibrarianSchool Librarian: ] 
Can’t wait to share the book with my kids. I know they will love it
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:01 School Librarian
5:01
[Comment From BobBob: ] 
Loved the book, Ellen. Glad I could join the chat.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:01 Bob
5:01
[Comment From JackieJackie: ] 
Looking forward to getting to know you, Ellen.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:01 Jackie
5:01
[Comment From Jenny BJenny B: ] 
Thanks for chatting. Love both books.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:01 Jenny B
5:01
[Comment From Pam PPam P: ] 
Hi from Ohio!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:01 Pam P
5:02
Ellen Airgood: 
Hello, everyone. Thank you for your kind words about the books, and for being here to chat. I'm excited about it.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:02 Ellen Airgood
5:02
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Lisa sent me some questions in advance, so I’ll let her do the honors of beginning --

Question from Lisa:

The education of Ivy Stands alone…

If you read that one first… you want to know more about the Evers…

If you read Prairie first…

You want to know what happens to Ivy…

Did you plan the books this way?

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:02 Nora, EarlyWord
5:03
Ellen Airgood: 
I didn’t plan it that way, but I’m so happy that’s the way it works out. I’m always trying to make characters palpable, truly human. Faceted. I hope readers always wants to know more, as they might want to know more about any person who piqued their interest.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:03 Ellen Airgood
5:04
[Comment From PamelaPamela: ] 
Do you think people need to read both the books?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:04 Pamela
5:05
Ellen Airgood: 
Pamela, I'd love it if people do read both books, of course...
But I really think they can each stand on their own very well. Both my editor and I tried to make sure that was the case....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:05 Ellen Airgood
5:06
Ellen Airgood: 
I feel that Prairie and Ivy are themselves, actual spirits out in the world, and not 'mine,' really. And I want them to be able to stand on their own feet out in that world....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:06 Ellen Airgood
5:06
Ellen Airgood: 
They are wonderful friends, but at the same time, they are very much individuals, and I wanted the books to reflect that. For them each to be strong in their own right.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:06 Ellen Airgood
5:07
[Comment From PamelaPamela: ] 
What did you have to do in the writing to make each stand alone?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:07 Pamela
5:07
Ellen Airgood: 
Pamela, that's a great question, about what I had to do as a writer to make them stand alone. I think, in a way, I had to forget about P. EVERS as I wrote IVY....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:07 Ellen Airgood
5:08
Ellen Airgood: 
It was a bit like starting completely new. Here was Ivy, in a situation. She had this great friend, and lovely family she'd lived with for a while, but the book is about NOW, and what will she do next...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:08 Ellen Airgood
5:09
Ellen Airgood: 
I wasn't sure as I began how much Prairie and the Evers would show up in Ivy's book. I had to let that play out. And in a way, Prairie is such a strong character, a force of nature, with such a bouyant voice, I was a little concerned about her taking over if she was too much present.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:09 Ellen Airgood
5:09
[Comment From Pam PPam P: ] 
The cover of IVY is darker than PRAIRIE, which fits with the books in my mind. Also, it seems to indicate they are two quite different. I assume that was deliberate?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:09 Pam P
5:10
Nora, EarlyWord: 
Since you've mentioned the covers, I will post them for people to look at.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:10 Nora, EarlyWord
5:10
Nora, EarlyWord
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:10 
5:10
Nora, EarlyWord
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:10 
5:10
Ellen Airgood: 
Pam, covers are so important, and I'm so happy with what the art dept. at Penguin has done. I love both the covers. Today the UPS man brought a finished hard cover of IVY, and I love it. LOVE it. The hardbacks are bright yellow beneath the dust jacket...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:10 Ellen Airgood
5:11
Ellen Airgood: 
And that brightness beneath the somewhat somber cover is perfect for Ivy. It makes my skin prickly, actually. That is Ivy's beautiful golden heart beneath the sober realities of her life.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:11 Ellen Airgood
5:12
Nora, EarlyWord: 
-- I hear you run a diner in Marais, Michigan -- is this the one?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:12 Nora, EarlyWord
5:12
Nora, EarlyWord
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:12 
5:13
Ellen Airgood: 
Yes! That's our diner. I'm currently sitting just behind the window on the second floor. I can see Lake Superior and some boats out on the water.

We have a little gift shop on the second floor, and one table in the window for people to drink coffee and use the internet without being on the main floor using tables we need for diners. Also it’s quieter up here! ...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:13 Ellen Airgood
5:13
Nora, EarlyWord
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:13 
5:13
Nora, EarlyWord: 
You also sent me a great shot of the diner in winter.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:13 Nora, EarlyWord
5:14
Nora, EarlyWord
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:14 
5:14
Ellen Airgood: 
And just to add a little more about the covers, I loved Prairie's cover too, the brightness was perfect for her, and I can't count how many diners asked if those were my legs. They weren't, but could've been.
Ah, and there is my window, the view I am seeing right now...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:14 Ellen Airgood
5:14
Ellen Airgood: 
Winters are quite dramatic here!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:14 Ellen Airgood
5:15
Nora, EarlyWord: 
Running a diner is time-consuming. HOW do you fit in writing?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:15 Nora, EarlyWord
5:15
Nora, EarlyWord
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:15 
5:15
Ellen Airgood: 
Nora, I have been asked that question about time so many times. I'm stubborn and I have worked very hard, I will admit. I've been dogged in my pursuit of this dream. And hard as it is...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:15 Ellen Airgood
5:16
Ellen Airgood: 
I have to say that running a diner feeds some fundamental core of me. I'm a high energy person, and the diner is a high energy place in the season...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:16 Ellen Airgood
5:16
Ellen Airgood: 
And the people. That's the real payoff in work like this. The people, the people. The friendships I've made. The things I've learned, both joyfully and not so joyfully. This place has grown me up.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:16 Ellen Airgood
5:17
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Michigan seems like a great setting. Why did you pick New Paltz for Ivy and Prairie?

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:17 Nora, EarlyWord
5:17
Ellen Airgood: 
New Paltz seemed to pick me. Prairie arrived in my head, already talking, one rainy April day many years ago. (the far-gone year 2000!) …
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:17 Ellen Airgood
5:17
Ellen Airgood: 
I literally sat up in bed and started taking notes of what she was 'telling' me, grabbing sheets of scrap paper, the back sides of drafts of a different novel I’d worked on all winter. I hadn’t been looking to start another just then, but all this knowledge sprang seemingly from nowhere and I had to get it down...
Prairie’s first words to me were, "Folks said it could not be done but I did it." That line didn't end up in the book, but the words perfectly convey her resolute attitude that shines through …
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:17 Ellen Airgood
5:18
Ellen Airgood: 
One of the things she let me know is that her family had moved from North Carolina to New York State, and she did not like it one bit. I had lived in New Paltz for a year after graduating from University of Michigan--I was a writer for Scenic Hudson, an intern--and so that's probably why Prairie's images of New York State were images of New Paltz. A great town in so many ways. Great pizza! And The Bakery... Mmmm.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:18 Ellen Airgood
5:18
Nora, EarlyWord: 
Lisa just asked if she can buy a coffee mug from your diner!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:18 Nora, EarlyWord
5:18
Ellen Airgood: 
Yes, Lisa, absolutely! We have those old fashioned thick ceramic mugs...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:18 Ellen Airgood
5:19
Ellen Airgood: 
I will happily mail you one...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:19 Ellen Airgood
5:19
Ellen Airgood: 
And totally off-topic but fun, I love stories of where those mugs show up...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:19 Ellen Airgood
5:19
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Thank you for posting the covers! The differences are powerful!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:19 Deborah Baldwin
5:19
[Comment From School LibrarianSchool Librarian: ] 
You live in a small town. How do people react to your being a writer?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:19 School Librarian
5:19
Ellen Airgood: 
One of my favorites: on the table of a monastery in North Dakota. how random is that?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:19 Ellen Airgood
5:20
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Prairie meets Ivy when she changes schools and has to try to learn to fit in. You write about that experience so well – it’s like everyone in the diner stopping and staring when a stranger walks in Did you experience that yourself?

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:20 Nora, EarlyWord
5:20
Ellen Airgood: 
Deborah, It's really interesting and great to hear that about the covers. And about changing schools...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:20 Ellen Airgood
5:21
Ellen Airgood: 
I never did that, but there are endless situations where kids feel like outsiders, and I think I experienced most of them.

I was a bookish kid and somewhat shy in grade school, though I was also cheerful and sure of myself. In middle school I began to flounder. Oh, those wars girls have. Maybe boys, too, but girls seem more guilty to me of mean campaigns. ..
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:21 Ellen Airgood
5:21
Ellen Airgood: 
The machinations of cliques made me miserable, but I was part of them at least once, out of desperation, and I remember feeling ill afterward...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:21 Ellen Airgood
5:21
Ellen Airgood: 
The awkwardness grew in junior high, and by high school I was a band nerd with excellent grades, a horrible haircut and worse clothes, huge eyeglasses, and no idea of how to talk to people...

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:21 Ellen Airgood
5:21
Ellen Airgood: 
But as awkward as I often felt, I always had friends, good friends. I always had fun things going on. I loved to be outside, ride our horses, to read and play clarinet and piano, all kinds of things. I was close to my family, I had things I knew I was good at. I had joys...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:21 Ellen Airgood
5:21
Ellen Airgood: 
I remember what a refuge and delight friendship was--and is. That’s what I wanted to write about.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:21 Ellen Airgood
5:21
[Comment From JoAnn from NMJoAnn from NM: ] 
Were you a reader as a child?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:21 JoAnn from NM
5:22
Ellen Airgood: 
JoAnn, I was a VORACIOUS reader, always. My parents and siblings also. We did not have a TV in our home until I was 12. I lied about this at school...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:22 Ellen Airgood
5:23
Ellen Airgood: 
I pretended I had seen whatever everyone else had seen. usually this didn't work out, because I'd get it wrong. Oh, the humiliation of that.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:23 Ellen Airgood
5:23
[Comment From Lisa from MnLisa from Mn: ] 
In Prairie Evers- Prairie is home schooled and KNOWS that she will hate school because she is an excellent reader. I loved that both your books portray a nuance of school experiences… was this deliberate choice?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:23 Lisa from Mn
5:24
Ellen Airgood: 
Lisa, I so wanted to give a balanced portrait of the pros and cons of both homeschooling and public school. School is such a huge part of kids' lives, and I have such vivid memories, both of the joys and the terrors...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:24 Ellen Airgood
5:25
Ellen Airgood: 
But as far as thinking ahead of how book one would be more a homeschool bias, a little, and book 2 a public school slant, Nope. I really did not know I would ever write a companion book to Prairie until I did it...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:25 Ellen Airgood
5:25
Ellen Airgood: 
Honestly, it seemed quite impossible to me in the two years between them that I would do that. Prairie seemed to have said all she had to, to me anyway, and quiet Ivy took a while to warm up to me and tell me what she had to.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:25 Ellen Airgood
5:26
Nora, EarlyWord: 

I think this earlier question from Lisa fits in here:


Librarians are talking a lot about diversity in books . Finding stories that express economic disparity this vividly are rare…can you say a few words about your choices.

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:26 Nora, EarlyWord
5:27
Ellen Airgood: 
One writes what one knows, I suppose. What one knows and loves....


Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:27 Ellen Airgood
5:27
Ellen Airgood: 
I have a wonderful life here on Lake Superior. It has not been an easy road, however. It’s not for most people who make a life here while they’re young, as I’ve been blessed to do. The economy is tough. It’s a great life, and this place develops some amazing people, stoic, funny, understated...and rugged...and I’m a part of it all....

And growing up on a small farm in the thumb of Michigan, equally wonderful, also let me be comfortable with writing about economic disparities.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:27 Ellen Airgood
5:27
Nora, EarlyWord: 

You said you were a "band nerd." That's more acceptable now -- do you think kids have a wider range of ways to be accepted today, or do they still deal with the same age-old problems, just in new forms?

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:27 Nora, EarlyWord
5:28
Ellen Airgood: 
Band nerd is a more acceptable thing now?! That’s cool. Even so I would suspect, human nature being what it is, that lots of kids face problems similar to Prairie’s and Ivy’s, and to the ones I faced in school...

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:28 Ellen Airgood
5:28
Ellen Airgood: 
And anyone at any age needs to be able to walk that line between fitting in and not being vulnerable to the agendas of folks who might not be at the kindest part of their walk in life.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:28 Ellen Airgood
5:28
Nora, EarlyWord: 

I like what you said about it being important to have a community of friends, but also to be able to stand on your own. Tell me more about that theme.

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:28 Nora, EarlyWord
5:29
Ellen Airgood: 
Friendships for kids--for adults too?--seem both easy and difficult to me. Natural and forced. But they become weird when the power play of school cliques comes in. …

I guess really, PRAIRIE EVERS, is about Ivy. About how sheltered Prairie has been from the kind of hardships Ivy knows, and how once they know each other, they complete each other in certain ways....


Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:29 Ellen Airgood
5:29
Ellen Airgood: 
I did not set out to write the story of one of my own friendships in school, but I'm sure it was a big part of the novel's origin. I had a wonderful childhood, but a close friend did not, and I was so sheltered that all I knew was, something was off, something was sad...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:29 Ellen Airgood
5:29
Ellen Airgood: 
I always wanted to help that friend. I had a special tenderness toward her. But it was not at all one way. She was lively and creative and FUN. She was more outgoing, more of a go-getter, much more daring. We helped each other.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:29 Ellen Airgood
5:30
[Comment From Judy DJudy D: ] 
Can you say who you like better? Ivy or Prairie?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:30 Judy D
5:31
Ellen Airgood: 
Judy, I love them both. I really do. I absolutely could never choose between them. They both have such wonderful and unique personalities. And I say this with that feeling that they are their own people. I helped them tell their stories, but those stories seemed to be already out there, waiting to be told.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:31 Ellen Airgood
5:31
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
I appreciate the authentic voice you write with and how your stories deal with differences; economic, family, setting...yet show a community... a family (not necessarily the family you're born with).
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:31 Deborah Baldwin
5:31
[Comment From Lisa from MnLisa from Mn: ] 
The adults are all fully realized from the hardware man to the waitresses to the teachers…I was in awe of Beryl
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:31 Lisa from Mn
5:31
Ellen Airgood: 
Thank you, Deborah. That's a wonderful compliment. And thank you Lisa, as well...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:31 Ellen Airgood
5:32
Ellen Airgood: 
I’m so glad the characters seem so vivid and real to you. I am a very serious writer, and that kind of veracity is what I want more than anything.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:32 Ellen Airgood
5:32
[Comment From Lisa from MnLisa from Mn: ] 
You perfectly captured the ambivalence of the child who yearns for her mother but the mother is incapable of that role even with repeated ample evidence… …how do you know exactly how this feels?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:32 Lisa from Mn
5:33
Ellen Airgood: 
Lisa, Thank you. I am not sure how I knew that. My own mother was fantastic. Much more like Prairie's mom....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:33 Ellen Airgood
5:33
Ellen Airgood: 
I have a good friend who had a mom more like Ivy's...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:33 Ellen Airgood
5:33
Ellen Airgood: 
She said, when she read the draft, "Did you KNOW my mother?"
...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:33 Ellen Airgood
5:34
Ellen Airgood: 
Good for me, not so good for her. I did not know her mother, and she doesn't talk about her much, so that's not how I knew. I pay attention, I suppose. I meet a lot of people. I see a lot of things....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:34 Ellen Airgood
5:34
Ellen Airgood: 
And to be very frank, for some aspects of Tracy, I took a long hard look at mistakes I have made....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:34 Ellen Airgood
5:35
Ellen Airgood: 
Not that I am her at all, but I think we can all relate to mistakes and missteps and times when we have been lost or confused, when we haven't been or best selves... and I tried to amplify that. And, as I said, I observe.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:35 Ellen Airgood
5:35
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Could you share a little bit about your writing process?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:35 Deborah Baldwin
5:36
Ellen Airgood: 
Deborah, I could go on and on about that, and will try not to...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:36 Ellen Airgood
5:36
[Comment From Lisa from MNLisa from MN: ] 
ohh, I like that phrase "best selves"
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:36 Lisa from MN
5:36
Ellen Airgood: 
As far as process, I often find myself leaned forward with my eyes narrowed when I’m working on early drafts and names and the core actions of scenes. The tough stuff makes me feel ill sometimes. When Ivy’s mom lets her down badly in this new book, I had to leave the desk and the room as soon as I’d drafted the scene....

I felt nauseous and had chills and headed for the diner, where the reassuring hum of ‘real life’ was going on...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:36 Ellen Airgood
5:37
Ellen Airgood: 
Thanks Lisa! I think we do contain multitudes, as Whitman said, and so selves seems apt to me...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:37 Ellen Airgood
5:39
[Comment From BethannyBethanny: ] 
Did you study writing anywhere?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:39 Bethanny
5:39
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
I think the intensity you feel while writing the action, helps us as readers connect with the story. You keep it real for us.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:39 Deborah Baldwin
5:40
Ellen Airgood: 
Thanks, Deborah! And Bethanny, I didn't study writing formally. I have a Bachelor's of Science from U of M. But I knew I wanted to be a writer from the time I was in the fourth grade...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:40 Ellen Airgood
5:40
Ellen Airgood: 
My fourth grade teacher gave lots of creative writing assignments.

The Halloween assignment, the first, was a huge Ah-ha moment for me. Those books I loved to read--somebody, some PERSON, wrote those books! I wanted to be that person. The first book I wrote....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:40 Ellen Airgood
5:41
Ellen Airgood: 
Was not at all good. PRAIRIE EVERS was probably the fourth. How I started--I just started. I decided there was no time like the present. My adult novel, SOUTH OF SUPERIOR, was the first to come out, in 2011, but I had written the first draft of Prairie Evers many years before that. It did need lots of work, but Prairie's voice was already there, and the main themes of the story.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:41 Ellen Airgood
5:41
Ellen Airgood: 
I was writing all along, of course. My first readers were my family. Not long out of college I wrote a short story I wanted to share with my siblings. I made them sit on the couch with afghans over their heads while I read it out loud to them. No kidding! (They said it was good.)...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:41 Ellen Airgood
5:42
Nora, EarlyWord: 
You studied SCIENCES st the University of Michigan, NOT writing?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:42 Nora, EarlyWord
5:42
[Comment From Suzanne (from Tennessee)Suzanne (from Tennessee): ] 
(I was a bookish band nerd with thick glasses and y best friend from those years is still my bestie, Her kids call me "Aunt Suzanne." )I think you did a great job of showing that sort of strong friendship.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:42 Suzanne (from Tennessee)
5:42
Ellen Airgood: 
Yep, Nora, science! I wanted to be an ecologist. Work outside by day, write novels by...night?... and now run a diner and write. Inside most of the time.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:42 Ellen Airgood
5:43
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
What advice would you offer for young writers?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:43 Deborah Baldwin
5:43
Ellen Airgood: 
Suzanne, cheers to another b.b.n. Several of my good friends from then are still good friends as well. And advice for young writers... oh, I love that question...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:43 Ellen Airgood
5:44
Ellen Airgood: 
I've had a lot of good advice, but a piece I always come back to I read in Janet Burroway's book about writing fiction...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:44 Ellen Airgood
5:44
Ellen Airgood: 
Write about what troubles you, especially if it seems to trouble no one else.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:44 Ellen Airgood
5:44
[Comment From Lisa from MnLisa from Mn: ] 
was it hard to get Prairie published?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:44 Lisa from Mn
5:45
Ellen Airgood: 
Lisa, that's a great question about publishing.... It's kind of complicated. Short version: my adult novel came out first, and PE followed along easily.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:45 Ellen Airgood
5:45
Ellen Airgood: 
BUT....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:45 Ellen Airgood
5:45
Ellen Airgood: 
I had written PE and worked on it for years and finally put it away and then turned to the adult novel...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:45 Ellen Airgood
5:46
Ellen Airgood: 
I worked on that over the course of seven years between beginning and pub. date....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:46 Ellen Airgood
5:46
Ellen Airgood: 
until at last...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:46 Ellen Airgood
5:46
Ellen Airgood: 
I had an agent!...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:46 Ellen Airgood
5:46
Ellen Airgood: 
The phone rang at the diner one spring day and the woman on the other end said, “Hello, Ellen, this is Joy.” I said, brightly, “Hi, Joy!” while I scrambled to think who that was. I wasn’t expecting my agent to phone me so soon after approving the mss as a go. I was in the middle of serving an order. Then it hit me: Oh my god. Joy! My agent!...

She had a book deal for me. I sank down onto the diner stool nearest the phone and put my head on the counter. “I think I might faint” I told her. She laughed. “Don’t do that,” she said. A moment later I served the breakfasts that were up. They were identical, to a couple from Wisconsin: two cheese omelettes with bacon and pumpernickel toast.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:46 Ellen Airgood
5:47
Ellen Airgood: 
For Prairie, it was different...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:47 Ellen Airgood
5:47
Ellen Airgood: 
I had worked on revisions with my agent’s assistant at the time, but I wasn’t aware that she and my agent were shopping the manuscript around. Sarah, Joy’s assistant, called me out of the blue one August night and gave me the news that PRAIRIE had been taken on by Nancy Paulsen. It was crazy busy and I remember that I had pizzas in the oven, and I gaped at the phone again....

This is not a pizza order, is it? It was a wonderful surprise.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:47 Ellen Airgood
5:48
Nora, EarlyWord: 

That diner does keep you real, doesn't it?


What was the process with your editor like for PRAIRIE?

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:48 Nora, EarlyWord
5:48
Ellen Airgood: 
Nora, the diner does do that. Keep me real. And I'm really very thankful for that. (Mostly.) The process with Nancy Paulsen was great. She would put questions in the margins, leading me to think through some of the scenes more thoroughly, to go beyond where I’d stopped.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:48 Ellen Airgood
5:49
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Did you ever hit a wall in the writing process?



Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:49 Nora, EarlyWord
5:49
Ellen Airgood: 
Hit a wall? Oh, yes. A number of times. But I’m stubborn. I hit the wall and slump against it for a while, but then I get mad and climb over or around or whatever. Now and then I have been known to sledgehammer a wall down.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:49 Ellen Airgood
5:50
Nora, EarlyWord: 
I'm going to show the photo you sent me of the journal you kept about Prairie and Grammy …
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:50 Nora, EarlyWord
5:50
Nora, EarlyWord
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:50 
5:50
Nora, EarlyWord: 
Please tell us about that.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:50 Nora, EarlyWord
5:51
Ellen Airgood: 
Nora, That journal is another of those things that makes me smile and makes my skin prickle a little at the same time. When Prairie was 'talking' to me I was keeping a journal and also cutting out photos from magazines that reminded me of Prairie and Grammy. The second photo, another journal page, involves the origin of character names...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:51 Ellen Airgood
5:51
Nora, EarlyWord
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:51 
5:52
Ellen Airgood: 
There it is. Probably impossible for you to read, but I'm writing there about a walk I took, trying to 'hear' more of what the character was telling me. Her name.... It was as if I was listening closely to a far-off voice. I talk about that in the journal I was keeping at the time. I spelled Prairie wrong and my punctuation was terrible, but almost everything essential about the story was clear to me from the first. It’s scary, in a way. What if in a future book the ideas don’t come zinging along the metaphysical story wires so clearly? Will it work out?....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:52 Ellen Airgood
5:53
Ellen Airgood: 
Mostly the names and the core facts just come. I have to listen for a while, and make sure I’ve understood correctly, but then I’ll know....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:53 Ellen Airgood
5:53
Ellen Airgood: 
The last line in that photo says something like...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:53 Ellen Airgood
5:53
Ellen Airgood: 
Fear is what makes people mean.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:53 Ellen Airgood
5:54
Nora, EarlyWord: 

That's a great one -- so true.

Unfortunately, we have less than ten minutes left and some questions piling up. We'll try to run through them quickly.

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:54 Nora, EarlyWord
5:54
[Comment From Lisa from MnLisa from Mn: ] 
would the grown ups who read your kid books like your grown up novel?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:54 Lisa from Mn
5:55
Ellen Airgood: 
Lisa, that's a great question. Yes! It's been so wonderful, a great feeling. My adult readers of SOS have also responded warmly to Prairie, and I hope they will to IVY as well...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:55 Ellen Airgood
5:55
Ellen Airgood: 
I am a little nervous for Ivy...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:55 Ellen Airgood
5:56
Ellen Airgood: 
Her debut... I'm protective of her. She's been through so much, and is such an inspiration to me. I hope people will respond positively to her brave telling of her story and what she's learned.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:56 Ellen Airgood
5:56
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Lisa's been asking the following and I've been holding her off, but she insists! Just give her a "yes" or "no"!

Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:56 Nora, EarlyWord
5:56
[Comment From Lisa from MnLisa from Mn: ] 
I need to know!!!! do you raise chickens? Goats? Do you make your own cheese?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:56 Lisa from Mn
5:56
Ellen Airgood: 
No, no, and no. Sadly. Dreams of mine. Diners don't allow that sort of thing...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:56 Ellen Airgood
5:56
Ellen Airgood: 
SOMEDAY.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:56 Ellen Airgood
5:57
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Is there a certain place or time of day you like to write? How frequently do you write?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:57 Deborah Baldwin
5:58
Ellen Airgood: 
Deborah, I prefer to write in the morning, but I will plow on regardless, as in the diner business I very often don't get my druthers. I try and write every day, pretty much. Try. I often write in bed. Also a great deal of all the books have been written at a long wooden booth in the back part of the dining room of the diner. (there's a whole set of rooms behind the facade.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:58 Ellen Airgood
5:58
[Comment From BobBob: ] 
I think boys will enjoy this -- the girls are kind of tom boys anyway and are kids most boys would like to hang our with.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:58 Bob
5:59
Ellen Airgood: 
Bob, thank you. I hope boys will like it, and I think so too. I received wonderful comments from boys on P. EVERS, as well as earlier unpublished books I took into the local schools, to reading groups, in order to feel like a 'real' writer long before I was published, and to get real input from kids.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:59 Ellen Airgood
5:59
Nora, EarlyWord: 
We might be able to combine the following two questions into one answer …
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:59 Nora, EarlyWord
5:59
[Comment From JoAnn from NMJoAnn from NM: ] 
Whose your favorite kids book author? Did you ever meet any authors when you were growing up?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 5:59 JoAnn from NM
6:00
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
What authors and/or books have influenced you as a writer?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:00 Deborah Baldwin
6:00
Ellen Airgood: 
Oh, favorite author. Oh gosh. Wait, stop....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:00 Ellen Airgood
6:00
Ellen Airgood: 
Favorites is always too hard of a question. Growing up, I loved Elanor Estes, I remember that. And Emily Dickinson's poem I'm nobody, who are you? And a thousand others... I never met any authors growing up...
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:00 Ellen Airgood
6:01
Ellen Airgood: 
Though one of the tv shows we watched at my grandparents house, The Waltons, was beloved of me, and when Will Gear came to our school, I was dumbstruck.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:01 Ellen Airgood
6:01
Nora, EarlyWord: 
This may have to be our final question …
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:01 Nora, EarlyWord
6:01
[Comment From JaniceJanice: ] 
Are there more Ivy/Prairie books in the pipeline?
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:01 Janice
6:01
Ellen Airgood: 
As an adult... Steinbeck, Tolstoy, Dickens... are all authors I am inspired by. Again, so many.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:01 Ellen Airgood
6:02
Ellen Airgood: 
Janice, I'm not sure if there are more Ivy/Prairie books. I heard a voice in my head the other night, and it was a girl somewhere between 6th and tenth grade... She wasn't Ivy or Prairie. I haven't found out her name yet... I'm working on another adult novel at present....
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:02 Ellen Airgood
6:03
Ellen Airgood: 
But the moment I can, I will be leaning forward to listen to that girl who said, It was squash or be squashed, that's what my parents didn't understand.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:03 Ellen Airgood
6:03
Nora, EarlyWord: 
Let's sneak in just ONE more … Lisa wants to know if you do school visits and if so how people can reach you.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:03 Nora, EarlyWord
6:04
Ellen Airgood: 
Lisa, Yes, I do like to do school visits, although I am so very far from anywhere it's not always easy to arrange. But I LOVE them. They are energizing. Also I can skype and etc. I have a website, EllenAirgood.com, and there's a contact form there that comes directly into my email. And I'm on Facebook, though the email is probably a better way to talk about visits.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:04 Ellen Airgood
6:05
Nora, EarlyWord: 

Thanks, so much Ellen. This was a lot of fun.

And thanks to all of you for joining us. What great questions!

Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:05 Nora, EarlyWord
6:05
[Comment From Judy DJudy D: ] 
Thanks, Ellen and thanks Penguin Young Readers for the eGalley. Loved it.
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:05 Judy D
6:05
Ellen Airgood: 
Thank you ALL! It was wonderful to talk with you. Cheers!
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:05 Ellen Airgood
6:06
Nora, EarlyWord: 

The next title in our program is: The Secrets of Blueberries, Brothers, Moose & Me: A Novel by Sara Nickerson A talented new middle-grade voice tells a story filled with heart about finding something all your own while the world changes around you. Read More »

Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:06 Nora, EarlyWord
6:07
Nora, EarlyWord: 

The next title in our program is: The Secrets of Blueberries, Brothers, Moose & Me: A Novel by Sara Nickerson A talented new middle-grade voice tells a story filled with heart about finding something all your own while the world changes around you. Read More »

Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:07 Nora, EarlyWord
6:08
Nora, EarlyWord: 

The next title in our program is:

The Secrets of Blueberries, Brothers, Moose & Me: A Novel

Sara Nickerson

A talented new middle-grade voice tells a story filled with heart about finding something all your own while the world changes around you
Wednesday May 6, 2015 6:08 Nora, EarlyWord
 
 

GalleyChat, BEA Edition,
Tues. May 5

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

This month’s GalleyChat has now ended. Join us for the next one on Tues., June 2, 4 to 5 p.m. EDT (3:30 for virtual cocktails)

Live Online Chat with Josh Lieb

Thursday, April 16th, 2015
Live Blog Live Chat with Josh Lieb, RATSCALIBUR
 

BEA — First-Timers Guide
for Librarians

Thursday, April 16th, 2015

EW-logo-BEABook Expo America is just six weeks away — time to start planning so you can get the most out of the show.

Several pf EarlyWord’s GalleyChatters, veteran BEAers, have created the EarlyWord BEA First-Timers Guide for Librarians to share tips and recommendations.

We’ve set it up as a forum, so you can ask questions, make connections with like-minded librarians before the show (maybe even find a roommate) and enter your own favorite tips.

We like to think of this as a free-flowing pre-BEA cocktail party, so please join in.

GalleyChat, Tues. April 7

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

This month’s GallyChat has now ended. Join us for the next one to find out which galleys fellow librarians are loving – Tuesday, May 4th,
4 to 5 p.m. EDT (3:30 for virtual cocktails)

LiveChat Today with CIRCUS MIRANDUS Author, Cassie Beasley

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

Our live chat has now ended. Read the archived version below.

Live Blog Live Chat with Cassie Beasley: CIRCUS MIRANDUS
 Live Chat with Cassie Beasley: CIRCUS MIRANDUS(03/18/2015) 
4:10
Lisa Von Drasek
Wednesday March 18, 2015 4:10 
4:45
Lisa Von Drasek: 
We will begin our live online chat with Cassie Beasley, author of CIRCUS MIRANDUS, in about 15 minutes.

The book will be published by Penguin/Dial in June.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 4:45 Lisa Von Drasek
4:48
Lisa Von Drasek: 
A debut middle grade novel, it just received a starred review from Kirkus.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 4:48 Lisa Von Drasek
4:48
Lisa Von Drasek
Wednesday March 18, 2015 4:48 
4:48
Lisa Von Drasek: 
Here's the full review …
Wednesday March 18, 2015 4:48 Lisa Von Drasek
4:48
Lisa Von Drasek: 
KIRKUS REVIEW -- starred One strange afternoon, 10-year-old Micah Tuttle finds out that magic is real. Micah always thought Grandpa Ephraim’s wild stories of the centuries-old Circus Mirandus were spun solely for his amusement. But when his dying grandfather writes a letter to the “Lightbender,” hoping to call in the miracle the magician had promised him as a boy, Micah learns the stories were true, and the appearance of Ms. Chintzy, the circus’ cantankerous parrot messenger, clinches the deal. Happily, Micah finds a loyal if somewhat challenging friend to help him track down the elusive light-bending magician: the magic-leery, science-minded Jenny Mendoza. Their budding rapport is nuanced and complex, a refreshing illustration of how absolute like-mindedness is not a prerequisite for friendship. On one level, the book is a fantastical circus romp, with fortunetelling vultures and “a wallaby that could burp the Greek alphabet.” On another, it’s both serious and thick with longing: Micah’s ache for the companionship of his once-vital guardian-grandfather; Grandpa Ephraim’s boyhood yearning for his absent father, as fleshed out in flashbacks; the circus founders’ desire to keep enchantment alive in a world where “faith is such a fragile thing.” A delicious confection and much more: it shows that the human heart is delicate, that it matters, and that it must be handled with care. (Fiction. 9-12)
Wednesday March 18, 2015 4:48 Lisa Von Drasek
4:55
Lisa Von Drasek: 

I’m your moderator.


In addition to being EarlyWord’s Kids Correspondent, I am the curator of the Children’s Literature Research Collections at the University of Minnesota, one of the world’s largest collections of children’s literature manuscripts and original. Before that, I was the Children's Librarian of the Bank Street College of Education. I’ve served on many awards committees including the Newbery, the National Book Awards for Young People's Literature and American Library Association's Notable Children's Books.

Wednesday March 18, 2015 4:55 Lisa Von Drasek
4:56
Lisa Von Drasek: 


You can send your questions through at any time. They'll go into a queue, and we'll submit as many of them as we can to the author before the end of the chat.


Don’t worry about typos – we’re sure to make them too!

Wednesday March 18, 2015 4:56 Lisa Von Drasek
5:00
Lisa Von Drasek: 
I see that Cassie has joined us -- we have a crowd gathering. Say hi to them.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:00 Lisa Von Drasek
5:00
Cassie Beasley: 
Hi, Lisa! Hi, everyone! So excited about this chat.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:00 Cassie Beasley
5:00
[Comment From M. Circus FanM. Circus Fan: ] 
LOVE the book! Thanks for doing this!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:00 M. Circus Fan
5:01
[Comment From Pam D.Pam D.: ] 
Been looking forward to this all month!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:01 Pam D.
5:01
[Comment From Sunny, OhioSunny, Ohio: ] 
Thanks for taking the time to talk to us.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:01 Sunny, Ohio
5:01
[Comment From FridaFrida: ] 
Great to know you're a real person, Cassie.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:01 Frida
5:01
[Comment From Brenda J.Brenda J.: ] 
Hi from Florida, land of circuses.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:01 Brenda J.
5:01
[Comment From Frances, INFrances, IN: ] 
Thanks, Lisa and thanks, Cassie
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:01 Frances, IN
5:01
[Comment From Book LoverBook Lover: ] 
Hi from a fan.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:01 Book Lover
5:01
[Comment From M.G. TeacherM.G. Teacher: ] 
Can't wait to share this book with my kids.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:01 M.G. Teacher
5:02
Cassie Beasley: 
Hello, hello! I am totally a real person, and I have been looking forward to this at least as much as you guys have!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:02 Cassie Beasley
5:02
Lisa Von Drasek: 

I'll start with a few comments.

I know you are excited about that great Kirkus review.



Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:02 Lisa Von Drasek
5:02
Lisa Von Drasek: 
You also got some other pretty great news recently. Film and TV rights were recently sold
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:02 Lisa Von Drasek
5:03
Lisa Von Drasek: 
And, for audio fans, there's the announcement that Bronson Pinchot to narrate the audio book …
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:03 Lisa Von Drasek
5:03
Lisa Von Drasek
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:03 
5:04
Lisa Von Drasek: 
You must be feeling pretty good about all that.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:04 Lisa Von Drasek
5:04
Cassie Beasley: 
My head is spinning with all of the good things that have happened for CM lately. The Kirkus review was such a thrill, and the movie news was a big surprise!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:04 Cassie Beasley
5:04
[Comment From Brooklyn librarianBrooklyn librarian: ] 
I LOVED this book! I can't wait to share it with my students!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:04 Brooklyn librarian
5:04
Cassie Beasley: 
And Bronson is lovely, lovely. He's promised to sneak me a clip of the audio ahead of schedule.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:04 Cassie Beasley
5:05
Cassie Beasley: 
Hi, Brooklyn librarian!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:05 Cassie Beasley
5:05
Lisa Von Drasek: 

I'll start with a really tough question:

Is there a one sentence “handle” that can describe the book to librarians and teachers?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:05 Lisa Von Drasek
5:06
Cassie Beasley: 
Lisa, that is a tough question. I would say that...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:06 Cassie Beasley
5:06
Cassie Beasley: 
Circus Mirandus is the story of a boy trying to save his dying grandfather by finding the magical circus that changed his life many years before.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:06 Cassie Beasley
5:07
Cassie Beasley: 
Which doesn't cover all of it of course! But one sentence can be tough!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:07 Cassie Beasley
5:07
Lisa Von Drasek: 

It works!

What does Mirandus mean?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:07 Lisa Von Drasek
5:08
Cassie Beasley: 
It means “wondrous” or “that which is to be marveled at”!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:08 Cassie Beasley
5:08
Cassie Beasley: 
It's Latin.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:08 Cassie Beasley
5:08
Cassie Beasley: 
I spent a ridiculously long time combing through lists of words to find the perfect name for the circus...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:08 Cassie Beasley
5:08
Cassie Beasley: 
so I'm glad you asked!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:08 Cassie Beasley
5:08
Lisa Von Drasek: 

Even though I know that Great Aunt Gertrudis (now that sounds Latin) is from Arizona I am not sure where Micah lives- is that a deliberate?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:08 Lisa Von Drasek
5:09
Cassie Beasley: 
Yes...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:09 Cassie Beasley
5:09
Cassie Beasley: 
I was hoping to give Micah’s hometown an Everytown kind of feel…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:09 Cassie Beasley
5:09
Cassie Beasley: 
I wanted readers to feel like the circus might show up where they lived...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:09 Cassie Beasley
5:10
Cassie Beasley: 
and of course the settings I’m most familiar with are all Southern settings, so I wanted to avoid giving the impression that this was a specifically “Southern story.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:10 Cassie Beasley
5:10
Lisa Von Drasek: 
I think Brooklyn librarian has a one-sentence handle for your CIRCUS MIRANDUS -- one you might enjoy …
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:10 Lisa Von Drasek
5:10
[Comment From Brooklyn librarianBrooklyn librarian: ] 
I'd say if you have kids that love Dahl and want a meaty fantasy...this is for them
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:10 Brooklyn librarian
5:11
Cassie Beasley: 
Ooo....I love that! "Meaty fantasy."
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:11 Cassie Beasley
5:11
Cassie Beasley: 
Can I steal that?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:11 Cassie Beasley
5:11
Lisa Von Drasek: 
How about the reference to Dahl -- are you fan of his?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:11 Lisa Von Drasek
5:12
Cassie Beasley: 
I have heard that comparison so often lately. I do love Dahl, but it's actually been a very long time since I read his books!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:12 Cassie Beasley
5:12
Cassie Beasley: 
Matilda was a favorite of mine growing up.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:12 Cassie Beasley
5:12
[Comment From Brenda J.Brenda J.: ] 
Do you like circuses?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:12 Brenda J.
5:13
Cassie Beasley: 
You know, I only went to an actual circus once as a child, but…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:13 Cassie Beasley
5:13
Cassie Beasley: 
we went to the fairgrounds every year for the traveling fair. I think there’s an element of mystery…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:13 Cassie Beasley
5:14
Cassie Beasley: 
and maybe even a kind of darkness to it. It’s all so pretty and bright and exciting, but then…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:14 Cassie Beasley
5:14
Cassie Beasley: 
there's the background of it. Just at the corner of your eye. Something that makes the glitz seem like a cover for the otherworldly.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:14 Cassie Beasley
5:14
Cassie Beasley: 
I think that's a lot of fun to play with as a writer!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:14 Cassie Beasley
5:15
[Comment From Brooklyn librarianBrooklyn librarian: ] 
It's all yours. That and I appreciated the juicy lNguage. I am looking forward to reading this aloud
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:15 Brooklyn librarian
5:15
[Comment From Brooklyn librarianBrooklyn librarian: ] 
The Dahl reference is that you are unafraid of showing difficult circumstances with unsympathetic adults as well as giving agency to the kids....also the wordplay and subtle humor
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:15 Brooklyn librarian
5:16
Cassie Beasley: 
Yay! Thank you Brooklyn librarian. I'm going to start telling people I write meaty fantasy with juicy language. My books will sound scrumptious.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:16 Cassie Beasley
5:16
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Who were your favorite authors as a child?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:16 Deborah Baldwin
5:17
Cassie Beasley: 
As a child? I loved William Goldman -- The Princess Bride, The Silent Gondoliers (which too few people have read). I was also a big fan...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:17 Cassie Beasley
5:17
Cassie Beasley: 
of my parents' collection of adult epic fantasy. And Harry Potter. Of course.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:17 Cassie Beasley
5:18
Lisa Von Drasek: 

Micah lost his parents at an early age- (this is typical in children’s books as adventure can’t happen if parents are supervising) we don’t really know anything about them…like how his dad and his aunt got along.

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:18 Lisa Von Drasek
5:18
Cassie Beasley: 
Oh, and Louis Sachar. I loved the Wayside School books and Holes.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:18 Cassie Beasley
5:19
Cassie Beasley: 
I know…children’s authors are terrible to parents aren’t we?…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:19 Cassie Beasley
5:19
Cassie Beasley: 
In my mind, Aunt Gertrudis has been more or less estranged from the family, happily living her own life apart from all of her brother’s “nonsense” stories…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:19 Cassie Beasley
5:19
Cassie Beasley: 
so Micah's dad would have known her but not been close to her.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:19 Cassie Beasley
5:20
Lisa Von Drasek: 

Love the name Gertrudis! Names are clearly important to you. How do you come up with them?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:20 Lisa Von Drasek
5:21
Cassie Beasley: 
Gertrudis...I just thought it sounded so crotchety and uptight. Perfect for her!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:21 Cassie Beasley
5:21
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Where did you get your ideas for your characters, especially Aunt Gertrudis? ...Any real life inspirations or purely fictional?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:21 Deborah Baldwin
5:21
Cassie Beasley: 
I do think a lot about names. I usually just try tons of different ones until one feels right.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:21 Cassie Beasley
5:22
[Comment From Pam D.Pam D.: ] 
How did you come up with the great character, the parrot Chintzy-
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:22 Pam D.
5:22
Cassie Beasley: 
Deborah, my great aunt is the sweetest lady in the whole entire world! So I'm going to have to be really careful to explain to her that...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:22 Cassie Beasley
5:22
Cassie Beasley: 
Great Aunt Gertrudis is not in any way based on her!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:22 Cassie Beasley
5:22
Cassie Beasley: 
As for the others--none of them are based on anyone in particular, except...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:22 Cassie Beasley
5:23
Cassie Beasley: 
Except for Chintzy, Pam!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:23 Cassie Beasley
5:23
Lisa Von Drasek: 
We thought it would be fun to ask people who their favorite characters are. Here comes the poll …
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:23 Lisa Von Drasek
5:23
Cassie Beasley
Chintzy is based on this pretty girl!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:23 
5:24
Lisa Von Drasek: 
OK, now everyone is totally distracted by Chintzy!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:24 Lisa Von Drasek
5:24
Cassie Beasley: 
Oh, it's a contest! I get to see who everyone likes best! :)
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:24 Cassie Beasley
5:24
Lisa Von Drasek: 

You mention that you read Harry Potter as a kid- How old were you and can you tell us a little about that experience?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:24 Lisa Von Drasek
5:25
Cassie Beasley: 
Yes, that's my African Grey parrot! She's sweet...except for the biting. And very talkative.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:25 Cassie Beasley
5:25
Cassie Beasley: 
Harry Potter-- I was in sixth grade!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:25 Cassie Beasley
5:25
Cassie Beasley: 
My homeroom teacher read us a few pages after lunch every day.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:25 Cassie Beasley
5:26
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
What a beautiful bird!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:26 Deborah Baldwin
5:26
Cassie Beasley: 
The whole class was enthralled, but it was taking her so long to get through it! I made my mom drive all the way to Savannah (an hour) so that I could get my own copy and the second book.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:26 Cassie Beasley
5:26
Lisa Von Drasek: 
Have you tried reading CIRCUS MIRANDUS aloud to any kids?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:26 Lisa Von Drasek
5:27
Cassie Beasley: 
Oh, she knows, Deborah! She thinks she is hot stuff. :)
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:27 Cassie Beasley
5:28
Cassie Beasley: 
That sounds terrifying, Lisa! What if they didn't like it?! Seriously though, I have a friend who is reading a copy to her two boys right now, and I am on pins and needles waiting to find out if they like it or not!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:28 Cassie Beasley
5:29
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
How long did it take you to write Circus Mirandus?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:29 Deborah Baldwin
5:29
Cassie Beasley: 
I have heard from a few librarians (Yay librarians!) that their students are really enjoying it, and that is the best feeling.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:29 Cassie Beasley
5:29
Cassie Beasley: 
It took me about two years to write the book. Almost all of that spent on various revisions.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:29 Cassie Beasley
5:30
Lisa Von Drasek: 
So far, Ms. Chintzy is beating Lightbender in our poll. Come on, Grandpa!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:30 Lisa Von Drasek
5:30
Cassie Beasley: 
The writing process never seems to stop though...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:30 Cassie Beasley
5:30
Cassie Beasley: 
I just made my very very final tweaks a few days ago, and sent it back to my editor.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:30 Cassie Beasley
5:30
Cassie Beasley: 
It's totally out of my hands now!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:30 Cassie Beasley
5:31
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Thank you for sticking with it!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:31 Deborah Baldwin
5:31
Lisa Von Drasek: 
Interesting that revisions continue AFTER galleys are sent out.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:31 Lisa Von Drasek
5:32
Cassie Beasley: 
I know, isn't it though?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:32 Cassie Beasley
5:32
Lisa Von Drasek: 

How did you develop the character of the grandfather?

He has many endearing attributes not the least is his faith in Micah. (and the twinkly in his eye)

Who is like that in your life?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:32 Lisa Von Drasek
5:33
Cassie Beasley: 
Revisions can happen write up until the moment when they pry it out of the author's fingers and send it to the printer! Which has happened! It's going to be a real book!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:33 Cassie Beasley
5:33
Cassie Beasley: 
Grandpa Ephraim has had his own backstory from the very beginning…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:33 Cassie Beasley
5:34
Cassie Beasley: 
which I think is so important, because too often grandparent figures in kids’ books are a little one dimensional…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:34 Cassie Beasley
5:34
Cassie Beasley: 
Grandpa Ephraim's part of the story--finding Circus Mirandus as a boy and then losing it as an adult--is at the heart of the book...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:34 Cassie Beasley
5:34
Cassie Beasley: 
so he grew as a character right alongside Micah.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:34 Cassie Beasley
5:35
Lisa Von Drasek: 

There are small humorous moments throughout the story that lighten the sadness and desperation of the plot, Chintzy of course but also in the dialog.

My favorite is when Micah is desperate to speak with Jenny and says it’s an emergency, its about home work and the mom says, “ Oh, okay.”

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:35 Lisa Von Drasek
5:35
Cassie Beasley: 
And, I seem to have said that "Revisions can happen 'write up until'"...proof that I am a real person, folks!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:35 Cassie Beasley
5:36
[Comment From Pam D.Pam D.: ] 
We agreed to overlook typos!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:36 Pam D.
5:36
Lisa Von Drasek: 

Circus Mirandus survives because of faith…can you talk a little about why that is important to you?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:36 Lisa Von Drasek
5:36
Cassie Beasley: 
Oh, Jenny! She's so cool. She's a lot like I was at that age. And she and Chintzy both make me laugh!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:36 Cassie Beasley
5:37
Cassie Beasley: 
I think that's important in any book...not to have one tone. To have humor and heartache...just like life!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:37 Cassie Beasley
5:37
Cassie Beasley: 
I don’t know if this answers the question, but…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:37 Cassie Beasley
5:38
Cassie Beasley: 
I think for Micah the circus represents hope, even after he reaches it and finds that things aren’t what he had initially expected…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:38 Cassie Beasley
5:38
Cassie Beasley: 
the hope that there is something better out there, and the belief that that something is within his grasp…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:38 Cassie Beasley
5:39
Cassie Beasley: 
it keeps him going even when the situation seems unassailable. It makes him stronger. Hope, faith, belief-- I think we need it...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:39 Cassie Beasley
5:39
Cassie Beasley: 
I think we lose some of it as we go through life, especially at the moments when we need it most, and I think that’s tragic.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:39 Cassie Beasley
5:41
[Comment From FridaFrida: ] 
That is, after all, what life is about. And kids really eat up stories that show both sides.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:41 Frida
5:41
Lisa Von Drasek: 

I related to the themes of a child learning how to deal with change and overcoming adversity. Were you conscious of those, or did the story just reveal itself to you?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:41 Lisa Von Drasek
5:42
Cassie Beasley: 
I don't think too much about themes/lessons/morals when I'm writing, especially the initial draft. I think the story has to come first...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:42 Cassie Beasley
5:42
Cassie Beasley: 
and then once that's done, readers are the ones who can really find all of the potential meanings I didn't even know were there!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:42 Cassie Beasley
5:42
[Comment From Pam D.Pam D.: ] 
Well said!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:42 Pam D.
5:43
[Comment From Pam D.Pam D.: ] 
Tell us about the art in the book. i loved the second cover!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:43 Pam D.
5:43
Lisa Von Drasek: 
Speaking of that cover -- here it is:
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:43 Lisa Von Drasek
5:43
Cassie Beasley: 
I love it too, Pam! It's by Diana Sudyka...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:43 Cassie Beasley
5:43
Lisa Von Drasek
Interior cover by Diana Sudyka
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:43 
5:44
Cassie Beasley: 
They didn't give me much say in the art, and I'm glad...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:44 Cassie Beasley
5:44
Cassie Beasley: 
because I never could have come up with something so cool!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:44 Cassie Beasley
5:44
Lisa Von Drasek: 

There are references to children’s literature embedded throughout this book- Peter Pan…. Can you tell us another?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:44 Lisa Von Drasek
5:45
[Comment From Suzanne (from Tennessee)Suzanne (from Tennessee): ] 
Wow! I love that much better than just the circus tent .
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:45 Suzanne (from Tennessee)
5:45
Cassie Beasley: 
I love that that art will show through the die-cut hat on the hardcover's dustjacket. And wait until you see the interior art! I just saw it all for the first time last week. Soooo good.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:45 Cassie Beasley
5:45
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Love the new cover!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:45 Deborah Baldwin
5:45
[Comment From Suzanne (from Tennessee)Suzanne (from Tennessee): ] 
I was a Latin major in college, so I love the name of the circus!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:45 Suzanne (from Tennessee)
5:45
Cassie Beasley: 
Oh yes. The book has two covers basically, which is so neat!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:45 Cassie Beasley
5:46
Cassie Beasley: 
Lisa...about other references.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:46 Cassie Beasley
5:47
Cassie Beasley: 
Those usually aren't intentional, so I have a hard time picking them out!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:47 Cassie Beasley
5:47
Cassie Beasley: 
I think the books we really love stick with us, even if its been years since we've read them,
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:47 Cassie Beasley
5:48
Cassie Beasley: 
we all internalize things, often without even realizing it, and then as a writer…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:48 Cassie Beasley
5:48
Lisa Von Drasek: 
Tell us what it was like to find out about the TV and film rights.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:48 Lisa Von Drasek
5:48
Cassie Beasley: 
hose story elements you’ve internalized and those themes, they keep cropping up whether you know it’s happening or not!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:48 Cassie Beasley
5:48
[Comment From FridaFrida: ] 
Which would you prefer, a book or a movie?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:48 Frida
5:49
Cassie Beasley: 
I wish I had a picture of myself jumping up and down and squealing, because I did quite a lot of that!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:49 Cassie Beasley
5:49
Cassie Beasley: 
And it all happened very very quickly. The producer who pre-empted the rights contacted me, and five days later we had the deal!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:49 Cassie Beasley
5:50
Cassie Beasley: 
Well, around five days. I didn't keep perfect track.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:50 Cassie Beasley
5:50
Cassie Beasley: 
Frida, books! I am a book girl through and through.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:50 Cassie Beasley
5:50
Cassie Beasley: 
Though I do love to go to the movies. I love sitting in the theater in the dark and seeing stories unfold.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:50 Cassie Beasley
5:51
[Comment From FridaFrida: ] 
That was a slip -- I actually meant to say -- which would you prefer, a movie or a TV series!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:51 Frida
5:51
Cassie Beasley: 
For that to be a possibility with Circus Mirandus--it's hard to fathom and so, so thrilling!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:51 Cassie Beasley
5:51
Cassie Beasley: 
Oh! A movie. I think.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:51 Cassie Beasley
5:51
[Comment From Suzanne (from Tennessee)Suzanne (from Tennessee): ] 
Who wouldn't be jumping? That's such exciting news.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:51 Suzanne (from Tennessee)
5:52
[Comment From M. Circus FanM. Circus Fan: ] 
I've seen comparisons to the adult book, NIGHT CIRCUS. Have you read it? I don't agree -- NIGHT CIRCUS had great atmosphere, but NO plot!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:52 M. Circus Fan
5:52
Cassie Beasley: 
Yes, a movie. Only because I'm not sure I can picture how they would string the story out into multiple seasons.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:52 Cassie Beasley
5:52
Lisa Von Drasek: 

THIS MIGHT BE A SPOILER perhaps not but….Can you talk about your choice to have Aunt Gertrudis be unredeemed.

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:52 Lisa Von Drasek
5:52
Cassie Beasley: 
I *have* gotten a lot of comparisons to NIGHT CIRCUS.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:52 Cassie Beasley
5:53
Cassie Beasley: 
I waited to read it until after I was basically finished with CM because I was afraid I would pick up elements, and I didn't want to copy!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:53 Cassie Beasley
5:53
Cassie Beasley: 
I enjoyed it, by the way. Love her conception of the circus.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:53 Cassie Beasley
5:53
Cassie Beasley: 
Lisa, absolutely!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:53 Cassie Beasley
5:54
Cassie Beasley: 
I did have a few early readers question whether it was right for Aunt Gertrudis not to have her moment of redemption…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:54 Cassie Beasley
5:54
Cassie Beasley: 
but I’ve been pretty adamant from the start that she doesn’t get that. Just because it would feel good to have that tidy bow on the ending…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:54 Cassie Beasley
5:54
Cassie Beasley: 
that doesn’t make it the right thing for the story. I want to write characters who are real, and the real Aunt Gertrudis has had decades to build up…
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:54 Cassie Beasley
5:55
Cassie Beasley: 
her emotional armor, her resentment, her bitterness. She’s not willing to change. She doesn’t even want it for herself.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:55 Cassie Beasley
5:55
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Are there more "Circus Mirandus" stories in the works?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:55 Deborah Baldwin
5:56
Cassie Beasley: 
CM does stand on its own, so it's not the kind of story that has to have a sequel. But, I have written one! It's a work in progress...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:56 Cassie Beasley
5:56
Cassie Beasley: 
waiting to see how my editor feels about it. I like it a lot, but that's pretty unsurprising. ;)
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:56 Cassie Beasley
5:56
[Comment From M.G. TeacherM.G. Teacher: ] 
Do you do school visits?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:56 M.G. Teacher
5:57
Cassie Beasley: 
I haven't done one before, since this is all so new, but I am totally game for school visits!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:57 Cassie Beasley
5:57
[Comment From M.G. TeacherM.G. Teacher: ] 
How can we contact you for a visit?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:57 M.G. Teacher
5:57
Cassie Beasley: 
The person to contact about that is my publicist at Penguin. Lauren Donovan.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:57 Cassie Beasley
5:58
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Looking forward to hearing if there will be more adventures... good luck... hope your editor like it.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:58 Deborah Baldwin
5:58
Lisa Von Drasek: 

We're closing in on the last few minutes.


One last question --

If you weren’t a writer what would you be?

Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:58 Lisa Von Drasek
5:58
Cassie Beasley: 
Or, you can always send requests through my website, and I'll forward them to her to address since I haven't quite got a handle on my own upcoming schedule!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:58 Cassie Beasley
5:59
Cassie Beasley: 
It's probably cheating to pick something that involves me reading books all day long isn't it?
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:59 Cassie Beasley
5:59
Cassie Beasley: 
But I guess I would be either a literature professor or a chef. School, books, food—my loves are simple ones!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:59 Cassie Beasley
5:59
Lisa Von Drasek: 
Oops, forgot -- I think you have a pecan recipe to share with us!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:59 Lisa Von Drasek
5:59
Cassie Beasley: 
I do!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 5:59 Cassie Beasley
6:00
Cassie Beasley: 
http://www.myrecipes.com/re...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:00 Cassie Beasley
6:00
Lisa Von Drasek: 

And, WHY do yo love pecans?



Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:00 Lisa Von Drasek
6:00
Cassie Beasley: 
My favorite way to bribe editors, agents, and everyone in between! It's the best toffee there is. :)
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:00 Cassie Beasley
6:00
Cassie Beasley: 
I do!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:00 Cassie Beasley
6:00
Cassie Beasley: 
But even if I didn't I would be obligated to say yes, all things considered. Farmer's daughter and all. :)
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:00 Cassie Beasley
6:01
Lisa Von Drasek: 
Cassie, thanks so much for doing this. We know we'll be hearing a lot more about CIRCUS MIRANDUS come June and we feel privileged to be amonth the first to talk to you about it.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:01 Lisa Von Drasek
6:01
Cassie Beasley: 
Oh...WHY? Because they're delicious. And good for your heart...
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:01 Cassie Beasley
6:02
Cassie Beasley: 
Thank you too! Thank you all! This was so much fun.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:02 Cassie Beasley
6:02
[Comment From Frances, INFrances, IN: ] 
Thanks, Cassie, good luck.
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:02 Frances, IN
6:02
[Comment From Sunny, OhioSunny, Ohio: ] 
Agree! This was great!
Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:02 Sunny, Ohio
6:03
Lisa Von Drasek: 

Over and out, everyone.

The next title in our program is Ratscalibur by Josh Lieb -- The Tonight Show showrunner reinvents the Excalibur legend—with rats!


More: http://bit.ly/1ByT1wZ



Wednesday March 18, 2015 6:03 Lisa Von Drasek
 
 

YA (and MG) GalleyChat

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

This month’s YA & MG GalleyChat has ended. Join us for the next one, Tuesday, April 21, 5 to 6 p.m. EDT (virtual cocktails served at 4:30).

GalleyChat, Tues. March 3

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

This month’s GalleyChat has now ended. Join us for the next one, Tuesday, April 7, 4 to 5 p.m. Eastern (3:30 for virtual cocktails). PLEASE NOTE: We will have sprung ahead to DAYLIGHT time by then so make adjustments for your own time zone.

GalleyChatter: Ten Fall/Winter Titles To Read Now

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

Editor’s Note:  Robin Beerbower is EarlyWord‘s regular “GalleyChatter” columnist. In her day job, Robin is the readers’ advisor and homebound services coordinator for the Salem [OR] Public Library. Enthusiastic about the importance (and fun) of reading books ahead of publication, she tirelessly tracks down galleys, making her an authority on what to read next. She is also very active on the Edelwiss Community Board, using it to spot titles and gauge developing buzz among librarians (you can join in; just register on Edelweiss and “friend” Robin).

Below are her picks of the titles brought up during our most recent GalleyChat. Join us for the next GalleyChat, Tuesday, Sept. 9 (note that this one is one week later than the normal first Tuesday of the month), 4 to 5 p.m., EDT — #ewgc.

If you missed the August chat, or simply found the feed a bit difficult to follow, check here for a list of the titles discussed.

Narrative Nonfiction 

“I want a true book that reads like a good novel.”  I love getting this question from patrons and so am pleased to learn about three new titles from fellow GalleyChatters..

9781594633355_93991   9780062284068_be2da   9780062325143_d2988

A literary true crime with touches of southern gothic, God’ll Cut You Down: The Tangled Tale of a White Supremacist, a Black Hustler, a Murder, and How I Lost a Year in Mississippi, John Safran (Penguin/Riverhead, November) won approval from two chatters.  Bryan Summers (Yuma County Library District) is especially keen on it saying, “The author is now in my I’ll-Read-Anything-By-Him pile.”

For a “great combo of a personal story & the science of attention,” Stephanie Chase of BiblioCommons recommends Matt Richtel’s “powerful” study of a 2006 “texting-while-driving” tragedy, A Deadly Wandering: A Tale of Tragedy and Redemption in the Age of Attention (HarperCollins/Morrow, September).

John Krakauer’s Into the Wild, about Christopher McCandless, who mysteriously disappeared into the Alaskan wilderness, has fascinated readers for years (as well as Sean Penn who adapted it into movie in 2007). In The Wild Truth (HarperOne, October), Carine McCandless gives us the story of her family and why her brother left for the wilderness. It even has a foreword by Krakauer himself. Darien Library’s Jennifer Dayton says, “we are presented a family dynamic so dysfunctional that it makes Chris McCandless’ [aka Alexander Supertramp] decision to walk away from polite society not only a viable solution but the right one.” As of this writing there is no DRC but email the HarperCollins library marketing rep for a print copy.

Book Group Candidates

9780316370134_320fbLeading the pack of  titles that will get reading groups talking is Laird Hunt’s Neverhome (Hachette/ Little Brown; Blackstone Audio; September), which not only won raves from GalleyChatters but has also garnered multiple reviews on Edelweiss. Vicki Nesting (St. Charles Parish Library) says “On its surface this is the story of a woman who dresses as a man and goes off to fight in the Civil War, yet the haunting, poetic writing elevates it beyond that. This is a story you will want to read aloud, to savor.”

9781455551927_e1afeReminding Kaite Stover (Kansas City Public Library) of Stephen King’s The Body (later turned into the movie “Stand By Me”), is Chris Scotton’s The Secret Wisdom of the Earth, (Hachette/Grand Central, January). This story set in the coal mining Appalachian mountains during the 1980s  saying it has the “same strong male relationships and heart-wrenching coming of age elements. “

9781476757445_a9bdcIt’s been a long wait for fans who loved Lois Leveen’s Secrets of Mary Bowser so we are excited that Juliet’s Nurse (S&S/Atria/Bestler) will be released in September. Early readers haven’t been disappointed. The story of Romeo and Juliet told from the perspective of Juliet’s nurse had Salem Public Library’s Ann Scheppke saying “To Leveen’s wonderfully crafted plot, add lovely language and a cast of truly complex characters. A sure bet for fans of Geraldine Brooks.” But please, no spoilers on the ending!

9780307700315_0376fJane Smiley’s A Thousand Acres remains a book group favorite, so there is already great anticipation for her new title, Some Luck (RH/Knopf, October). Jennifer Dayton says this first book in a trilogy featuring generations of an Iowa farm family is easily one of her favorite books of the year. The other two are scheduled to be published in spring and late summer of 2015.

9780525427247_21290If it is set in a bookshop and features Jane Austen, it seems like a sure thing that book groups will want to read it. The literary mystery First Impressions: A Novel of Old Books, Unexpected Love, and Jane Austen, Charlie Lovett (Penguin/Viking, October), is a favorite of Beth Mills (New Rochelle Public Library) who says what she found intriguing was that the imagined relationship for Austen wasn’t romantic, but one that fostered her confidence as writer.

Crime Fiction

9781594633669_dc9b1  9781464203121_d2931

Paula Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train (Penguin/Riverhead; January) had me riveted from the first page and January can’t come soon enough so I can get this in the hands of patrons — or at least on their holds lists.  My colleague Ann Scheppke says this mashup of Gaslight and Rear Window with its cast of control freaks, liars, and philanderers is a compulsively readable debut novel.

For patrons who want a fearless and witty private investigator similar to Sue Grafton’s, I push Betty Webb’s mysteries featuring Scottsdale’s Lena Jones.  I’m delighted to report that her latest, Desert Rage (Poisoned Pen Press, October) is one of the best in the line-up. Collection librarians may want to consider picking up her entire backlist, so patrons can start from the beginning.

Join us Tuesday, September 9 (note the temporary change to the second Tuesday) for our next GalleyChat and please friend me if you want notifications of what I’m anticipating on Edelweiss.

YA (and MG) Galleys To Read Now

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

9780062310637_2b2aa 9780803734968_8eaeb 9780525425632_48b6d

Yesterday’s YA GalleyChat give us even more reason to tackle our TBR piles (just a few of the covers, above).

We were also introduced to the Librarian Rap by  Kirby Heybourne, the audiobook narrator for Scowler audiobook (RH/BOT), which he performed at ALA’s Odyssey Awards ceremony (we’ve seen people pandering to the crowd, but this takes it to a new level — watch out, John Green):

We also discovered that there is a new trend among library marketers, book jacket nail art:

Holm Nail Art  Fangirl Nail

Left — Books on Tape nail art for the upcoming The Fourteenth Goldfish, Jennifer Holmm (RH Young Readers; RH.Listening Library; 8/26). Right —  Macmillan Library Marketing’s tribute to Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell.

The Fourteenth Goldfish was one of the favorites of the book chat, with readers urging other librarians to download it from Netgalley or Edelweiss, calling this middle grade title, “both complex and easy to read.”

9780316236621_f0b65  9780547628400_cfcaf

Another middle grade title getting raves, available as an e-galley, was Kat Yeh’s The Truth About Twinkie Pie.

The star among the YA titles was Mortal Heart, (HMH Young Readers, 11/4/14), the conclusion to Robin LaFevers’ His Fair Assassin trilogy, which is showing “much love” from 35 peers, 22 of them librarian, on Edelweiss. one of the highest ratings we’ve seen, especially for a book that won’t be published for another four months. One librarian said that a teen boy begged her for it on hands and knees yesterday. It’s coming in November, but you can request eGalleys now.

To read about the other titles that were hits with the group, check our downloadable spreadsheet — EarlyWord YA GalleyChat, 7/15/14  — click on the links to check for eGalleys.

Please join us for the next YA GalleyChat on August 19, 5:00 to 6:00 p.m., ET (4:30 for virtual cocktails). More details here.

 

May GalleyChat – A Few (out of many) Good Books

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

Ed Note: To help you sort through (or add) to your TBR piles, below is GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower’s picks of the titles brought up during our most recent GalleyChat. Join us for the next GalleyChat, Tuesday, June 3rd, 4 to 5 p.m., EDT — #ewgc.

May 6th’s chat was chock-full of so many appealing books we may all need to take a long vacation this summer so we can read! Chatters brought up over 80 books in a variety of genres and since there is no way I can summarize everything, two collections were created on Edelweiss — one for titles with e-galleys, including new titles by Philippa Gregory, David Mitchell, Ann Hood, and Sarah Waters. (remember to log in. Otherwise, you won’t be able to see the download buttons).

List for May 6 GalleyChat with E-Galleys

The other list includes titles which are not available as e-galleys (this is fluid, however, so you may find that some now have download buttons).

List for May 6 GalleyChat without E-Galleys 

Below are a few titles that rose to the top of the GalleyChat pile:

that night

One of my “go-to” books for library patrons who want a thriller is Chevy Stevens’ debut, Still Missing, and her most recent book, That Night (St. Martin’s, June) has been mentioned multiple times over the past few GalleyChats. This is a top-notch psychological thriller that was so relentless I had to stop reading a few times to catch my breath. If you would like an e-galley, Talia (Talia.Sherer@macmillan.com) will hook you up.

Based on the 23 “much love” recommendations on Edelweiss, JoJo Moyes’ quirky love story One Plus One (Penguin/Pamela Dorman, July) is destined to be a summer “must-read.” Arizona librarian and regular GalleyChatter Melissa Samora said Moyes is quickly becoming a favorite author and loves the characters she creates.

How can a reader resist comments such as “I wonder how to describe The Quick without giving away the surprise?” (Marie Andrienne) and the reply “Know exactly whatquick you mean; it is a puzzlement for me as well.” (Lucy Lockley)? So it seems there is nothing else to say about the Victorian thriller The Quick by Lauren Owen (Random House, June) except to add that three librarians said it was a very intriguing and surprising book. It is also included the the just-published New Republic‘s Summer Reading Guide which also alludes to twists and turns and warns, “Read it with the lights on.”

GalleyChat regular Janet Lockhart, Wake County (NC) collection development librarian, brought up The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee by Marja Mills, a memoir that recounts Mills’ friendship with the author of To Kill a Mockingbird. Janet said, “This is a fascinating peek into the life of a notoriously private person, done in a respectful and delicate manner.” Lee is currently in the news for reinstating her lawsuit against her hometown’s museum (and for finally approving the e-book release of To Kill a Mockingbird, which may bring interest in finding out she is “really” like.

I”m out of time but stay tuned for more amazing titles librarians have loved. Please friend me if you would like to keep in the loop of what I’m anticipating on Edelweiss.

Promote LibraryReads!

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Help your readers discover librarians favorite titles for the month. Incorporate LibraryReads marketing materials in your newsletters, on your Web sites and in print, downloadable here.

Marketing Materials

OnLine Chat with Derek Sherman

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013