Archive for the ‘GalleyChat’ Category

GalleyChat Roundup, June, 2022

Wednesday, June 8th, 2022

We experienced some Twitter issues during the June chat. As a result, there were fewer titles than usual, around 170, down from a high of 250. We don’t know what happened, one of our GalleyChatters received a notice that posts were being held back for potentially “harmful content.” Maybe that proves what we’ve always thought, reading can be a dangerous activity. Roundups are below. To read the full chat, search Twitter by #ewgc.

EarlyWord GalleyChat, June, 2022 — link to spreadsheet of the titles on Google Docs. Includes quotes from tweets, notes on debuts, diversity titles, those mentioned for the first time, LibraryReads deadlines and DRC availability. NOTE: If you have any trouble downloading the spreadsheet, please let us know.

Edelweiss catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, and links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Our next chat is scheduled for Thursday, July 7th, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails).Click here for the schedule of upcoming GalleyChats.

The next LibraryReads deadline is July 1, for books publishing in August. Please give special attention to our list of upcoming diversity titles.

GalleyChat Roundup, April, 2022

Monday, April 11th, 2022

The title pipeline is fairly gushing with books held back by lockdown. Our April chat featured an abundance of titles, over 250. Roundups are below. To read the full chat, search Twitter by #ewgc.

EarlyWord GalleyChat, April, 2022 — link to spreadsheet of the titles on Google Docs. Includes quotes from tweets, notes on debuts, diversity titles, those mentioned for the first time, LibraryReads deadlines and DRC availability. NOTE: If you have any trouble downloading the spreadsheet, please let us know.

Edelweiss catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, and links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Our next chat has been rescheduled from the usual first Thursday of the month, to Tuesday, May 3rd, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails), to avoid conflict with the day-long virtual LJ Day of Dialog. After that, we return to Thursdays. Click here for the schedule of upcoming GalleyChats.

The next LibraryReads deadline is May 1, for books publishing in June. Please give special attention to our list of upcoming diversity titles.

Remarkable Early Attention

In the Time of Our History
Susanne Pari
PRH/Random House/ Kensington/ A John Scognamiglio Book
December 27, 2022
9781496739261, 1496739264

It won’t be released until the end of the year, but this title is already heating up, with the front and back covers featuring quotes from librarians and GalleyChatters — Jennifer Dayton, “This wonderful novel is a poignant examination of what it means to be in exile, either from the country of one’s birth or of one’s own heart.”– Beth Mills. “A very moving story of dysfunctional family members struggling to satisfy the universal human longing for the love of family and a place that feels like home. These characters will stay with the reader after the last page is turned.” — Jennifer Winberry, “Explores the fierce women and their role as mothers and sisters, by blood or by choice, against a rich, cultural backdrop,”– Douglas Beatty, “In a work both timely and culturally relevant, this story of an Iranian American family struggling with grief will captivate readers with its nuanced characters and strong exploration of family dynamics …the roles of women in a changing society, and characters strain[ing] to find balance between a modern world and the traditional Moslem religion that is steeped in patriarchy.”

Library Love Fest GalleyClub a Hit Maker

Begun in February HarperCollins Library Love Fest’s new online series, Galley Club, is already creating hits. The program introduces librarians to a new title every month, through interviews with each book’s author, editors and others behind the book. All three titles that have been featured, including the one just announced for April, are getting GalleyChat raves.

The Measure
Nikki Erick
HarperCollins/Morrow
June 28, 2022
9780063204201, 0063204207
Hardcover

HOT, DEBUT — HarperCollins LibraryLoveFest GalleyClub selection for March — Vicki Nesting @VNesting, “…a gorgeous, gorgeous debut. The premise? One morning all adults worldwide receive a box containing a piece of string that shows the measure of their life. What happens next? This will definitely be on my ‘Best of 2022’ list.” —  Jenna Friebel @jenna_friebel, “…really thought provoking. Would be so good for book clubs. Julia Whelan does the audio and she’s the best.”

Hot Diversity for June

More Than You’ll Ever Know
Katie Gutierrez
HarperCollins/Morrow
June 7, 2022
9780063118454, 0063118459
Hardcover

DEBUT, HarperCollins LibraryLoveFest GalleyClub selection for April, and a Library Journal Prepub Alert pick — Jane Jorgenson @madpoptart, “Great mystery/suspenser,” — LJ Prepub Alert, “In 1985, Dolores ‘Lore’ Rivera marries Andres Russo in Mexico City, Mexico, despite her already being married …The truth finally comes out when one husband is arrested for murdering the other …”

Woman of Light
Kali Fajardo-Anstine
PRH/Random House/One World
June 7, 2022
9780525511328, 0525511326
Hardcover

Heating up, multiple “Much Love” on Edelweiss — Mara @mrlzbth, “…historical fiction primarily set in 1930s Denver about a tea leaf reader named Luz Lopez and the stories of five generations of her Indigenous Chicano family. Vivid characters and a really moving plot.” — Kimberly Mcgee @kimsbookstack, “… beautifully written historical fiction gem about lives and stories not usually told.”

GalleyChat Roundup, March 2022

Tuesday, March 8th, 2022

The third chat of the new year rivaled the previous two, with nearly as many titles, over 210, some as far ahead as December. Roundups are below. To read the full chat, search Twitter by #ewgc.

EarlyWord GalleyChat, March, 2022 — link to downloadable spreadsheet of the titles on Google Docs. Includes quotes from tweets, notes on debuts, diversity titles, those mentioned for the first time, LibraryReads deadlines and DRC availability. NOTE: If you have any trouble downloading the spreadsheet, please let us know

Edelweiss catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, and links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Our next chat has been moved to the first Tuesday of the month, April 5th, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails), to avoid conflict with the day-long  PRH Spring Book Fest. Click here for the schedule of upcoming GalleyChats.

A Super Remarkable Debut

Remarkably Bright Creatures
Shelby Van Pelt
On Sale Date: May 3, 2022
9780063204157, 0063204150
Hardcover $27.99
Fiction / Literary

This debut is so hot, we had to create a new category for it,  “SUPER HOT.” Excitement has been growing on GalleyChat since it was first mentioned in November. The following is just a selection of the many accolades — Cari Dubiel @caridubiel, “A grieving woman in the twilight of her life bonds with a sentient octopus facing his own death. An unusual and moving story with great character development and voice.” — Vicki Nesting @VNesting, “The relationship between the aquarium’s custodian Tova and the octopus Marcellus is the heart of the story, but the cast of other quirky characters round things out nicely. The audiobook is exceptional.” — audio DRCs available on Edelweiss and NetGalley — Kimberly Mcgee @kimsbookstack, “My fave this year has been REMARKABLY BRIGHT CREATURES. Who wouldn’t fall for a very wise octopus who escapes for sushi every night and guides the woman he bonded with. Everyone has to read this tearjerker big hearted story!”

It was the featured title in February on HarperCollins Library Love Fest’s new online series, Galley Club, which introduces librarians to a new title on the first three Tuesdays of each month, including interviews with each book’s editorial team as well as the authors themselves.

The March selection, which launches Tuesday, March 8,  is the debut The Measure by Nikki Erlick, releasing in June, described by GalleyChatter Janet Lockhart @HartGami, “Would you want to know exactly how long you have to live? That’s the question faced by the world in THE MEASURE by @nikkierlick. Still not sure what my answer would be.”

To learn about this and upcoming series, follow Library Love Fest on Facebook, or on the Library Love Fest web site.

Hot Diversity Titles for May 

The next LibraryReads deadline is April  1, for books publishing in May. Please give special attention to our list of diversity titles for LibraryReads consideration. Below are GalleyChatter favorites.

Yerba Buena
Nina LaCour
On Sale Date: May 31, 2022
9781250810465, 1250810469
Hardcover $26.99
Fiction / LGBTQ+ / Lesbian

HOT on GalleyChat, as well as multiple “Much Love” on Edelweiss — Jenna Friebel @jenna_friebel, “A for-sure-will-be-on-my-2022-favorites title…like Sally Rooney in terms of character study/ relationships focus, but with the sparse yet poetic prose” —  Carol Ann Tack @Carolanntack, “I read YERBA BUENA in two days and wished I hadn’t rushed through this remarkable story of love and family…it made my heart sing.”

A Caribbean Heiress in Paris 
Adriana Herrera
On Sale Date: May 31, 2022
9781335639844, 1335639845
Trade Paperback $16.99
Hardcover library edition, 9781335427519
Fiction / Romance / Multicultural & Interracial

HOT, JenniferSchultz @Jennsreads,  “A deliciously written Belle Epoque romance was just what I needed. The first paragraph is a master class in how to introduce character and setting. Such a treat. ” — Mara @mrlzbth, “…a fun romance about a woman from Santo Domingo who travels to Paris in 1889 looking for lucrative connections for her family’s rum business…but who of course finds love as well. The first in a planned series!”

Siren Queen
Nghi Vo
On Sale Date: May 10, 2022
9781250788832, 1250788838
Hardcover $26.99 USD
Fiction / Asian American

HOT on GalleyChat and multiple “Much Love” on Edelweiss — Ingram Library Services @TheLibraryLife_ “about young queer Chinese American wannabe starlet Luli & her story of navigating the treacherous, lecherous underworld of Golden Age Hollywood – full of actual monsters. ” — Mara @mrlzbth, “…a really dark and imaginative spin on the glamour of old Hollywood! I’ve been meaning to read her take on Gatsby from last year (THE CHOSEN AND THE BEAUTIFUL) and this definitely nudged me to do that soon.”

The Hacienda
Isabel Cañas
On Sale Date: May 3, 2022
9780593436691, 0593436695
Hardcover $27.00
Fiction / Gothic

Heating up — Michelle M @blkMYmorris. “I’m enjoying THE HACIENDA by Isabel Cañas. The historical setting, after the Mexican War of Independence is fresh setting for Gothic horror. It has malevolent spirits, a priest with a past, and touches on racism and classism.” — Jenna Friebel @jenna_friebel, “One of the books I’ve mentioned before but will not stop yelling about how much I loved.”  — Louisa @llws, “I am so excited for this book! I love, love, love her short fiction and the buzz for this book is so strong.” — Contributor Bio, “Isabel Cañas is a Mexican-American speculative fiction writer. After having lived in Mexico, Scotland, Egypt, and Turkey, among other places, she has settled (for now) in New York City, where she works on her PhD dissertation in medieval Islamic literature and writes fiction inspired by her research and her heritage.”

GalleyChat Roundup, Feb. 2022

Thursday, February 10th, 2022

The second chat of the new year was nearly as blazing as the first, with over 230 titles grabbing GalleyChatter’s interest. Roundups are below. To read the full chat, search Twitter by #ewgc.

EarlyWord GalleyChat, Feb, 2022 — link to spreadsheet of the titles on Google Docs. Includes quotes from tweets, notes on debuts, diversity titles, those mentioned for the first time, LibraryReads deadlines and DRC availability. NOTE: If you have any trouble downloading the spreadsheet, please let us know

Edelweiss catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, and links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Our next chat will be held on Thursday, March  3rd, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Click here for the schedule of upcoming chats.

The next LibraryReads deadline is March  1, for books publishing in April. Please give special attention to our list of diversity titles for LibraryReads consideration.

Meet the Authors

GalleyChatters were impressed by debut author Marytza K. Rubio during the online Preview of Spring 2022 Novels, organized by library marketers from several publishing houses and moderated by GalleyChatter Jennifer Winberry, Assistant Director, Hunterdon Public Library, NJ.

Rubio’s book of short stores, Maria Mariais described as “a darkly funny and imaginative debut conjuring tales of Mexican American mystics and misfits”

Also included in the episode is Elodie Harper, author of The Wolf Den, praised by GalleyChatter Jill Minor @JillRhudy, “Desire is their business, but sex is the last thing they desire. Slavery, trafficking, power dynamics, ultimate sacrifices for survival and freedom. THE WOLF DEN brings the women in a brothel in Pompeii to life.” The title has  been so hot on GalleyChat that we will be very surprised if it is not the #1 LibraryReads pick for March (sorry, the deadline for voting is over).

HarperCollins Library Love Fest introduced a new program called GalleyClub this month. The first title of the series, Remarkably Bright Creatures, the debut novel by Shelby Van Pelt coming in May, is described as being “about a widow’s unlikely friendship with a curmudgeonly giant Pacific octopus reluctantly residing at the local aquarium — and, when a mysterious grifter comes to town, the truths all three unlock about her son’s disappearance 30 years ago,”

It is already a hit with many GalleyChatters. The clip played on the show convinced even more to pick it up. In the second episode, on Tues., Feb. 8, the library marketing team talk with the book’s editors. In the third and final episode of this series, coming Tuesday, Feb. 15, they will interview the author. To learn about upcoming series, follow Library Love Fest on Facebook, or on the Library Love Fest web site.

GalleyChatters’ Favorite April Diversity Titles

Science Fiction / Cyberpunk
Monáe, Janelle
Memory Librarian
HarperCollins

This title has been hot on GalleyChat for several months —   librarylovefest @librarylovefest, “Are you in the mood for something revolutionary? I can’t say enough about THE MEMORY LIBRARIAN by Janelle Monae! …the perfect mash-up of dystopian and utopian … a big one for any cyberpunk fans!” — JAN, Jenna Friebel @jenna_friebel, ” currently reading THE MEMORY LIBRARIAN by Janelle Monáe & others. First story was great- excited to dive into the others!…Dirty Computer is one of my most played CDs. Love love love her.”

Fiction / Women
Perkins-Valdez, Dolen
Take My Hand
PRH/Penguin/Berkley

HOT, Vicki Nesting @VNesting, “Started
TAKE MY HAND by Dolen Perkins-Valdez last night and could not put it down. Inspired by real events, a nurse in Alabama in 1973 blows the whistle on a terrible wrong done to her clients.”– JAN, Nanette Donohue @surferrosa, “…an engrossing, thought-provoking novel about the intersection of race, class, and women’s health. I’m still thinking about it three weeks after I finished it.” — Janet Lockhart @HartGami, “…let me join the chorus of praise. An important story that cannot be forgotten … Historical fiction at its finest and most relevant.”

Fiction / LGBTQ+ / Gay
Stuart, Douglas
Young Mungo
Grove Press

This title has multiple “Much Loves” on Edelweiss, mostly from booksellers and GalleyChatters are showing interest. — Publishers Summary, “A story of queer love and working-class families, YOUNG MUNGO is the brilliant second novel from the Booker Prize-winning author of SHUGGIE BAIN.’

Fiction / Literary
Zhang, Jenny Tinghui
Four Treasures of the Sky
Macmillan/Flatiron Books

DEBUT — Mara @mrlzbth, “I have to rave about Jenny Tinghui Zhang’s stunning debut novel FOUR TREASURES OF THE SKY, absorbing historical fiction with an unforgettable protagonist.” — Vicki Nesting @VNesting, “…Gorgeous cover and an intriguing historical plot featuring a young Chinese girl trying to make her way in the American West.”

Fiction / African American & Black / Historical
Bryce, Denny S.
In the Face of the Sun
Kensington

JenniferSchultz @Jennsreads, “If you loved WILD WOMAN & THE BLUES by Denny S. Bryce, don’t miss IN THE FACE OF THE SUN. This dual timeline historical novel (1920s and 1968) is rich with period details of Black American life during those eras and unforgettable characters.” — Kimberly Mcgee@kimsbookstack, “A great tale of a famous L.A. hotel catering to the Black elite in 1928. Old Hollywood, sisters, secrets and a crazy road trip in 1968 from Chicago back to L.A. with a wild carload of characters.” — JAN, LMR, Michelle Lauren Addo @MichelleAddo, “At the height of the Civil Rights Movement, a pregnant young woman & her aunt embark on an audacious road trip from Chicago to Los Angeles to confront a mystery from 1920’s Black Hollywood.”

Fiction / Historical / Ancient
Patel, Vaishnavi
Kaikeyi
Hachette/Redhook

DEBUT, Multiple “Much Loves” on Edelweiss — Mara @mrlzbth, “My favorite read this month was KAIKEYI by Vaishnavi Patel, a compelling reimagining of Indian mythology that completely held my interest from start to finish. The CIRCE comparisons are well-deserved with this one!” — Janet Lockhart @HartGami, “Three chapters in and I’m already captivated by this reimagining of the story of the queen in the Indian epic the Ramayana is perfect for fans of CIRCE.”

Hearing from the Deaf

Deaf Awareness month isn’t until September, but April brings several new books by deaf authors.

   

Biography & Autobiography / People With Disabilities
DiMarco, Nyle
Deaf Utopia
HarperCollins/William Morrow

Mara @mrlzbth, “I’m currently about halfway through Nyle DiMarco’s memoir DEAF UTOPIA and highly recommend it! I wasn’t familiar with him before this [he the first male and first deaf winner of “America’s Next Top Model”, followed by winning “Dancing with the Stars”]  but it’s a really interesting and entertaining look at his life as a Deaf person and also at the history of Deaf education and culture.” — Jennifer Schultz @Jennsreads, “It’s a great read, I learned so much.”

Fiction / Coming Of Age
Fell, Blair
The Sign for Home
S&S Atria/Emily Bestler Books

Multiple “Much Loves” on Edelweiss — JenniferSchultz @Jennsreads, “THE SIGN FOR HOME by Bell Flair is an endearing, heartbreaking, funny, and eye-opening contemporary novel about a Blind-Deaf college student and his interpreter who embark on a journey to find freedom and lost love.” —  S&S EducationLibrary @SSEdLib, “…when Arlo Dilly learns the girl he thought was lost forever might still be out there, he takes it as a sign and embarks on a life-changing journey to find his great love-and his freedom.”

Fiction / Coming Of Age
Novic, Sara
True Biz
PRH/Random House

Oprah Daily picked this as one of the “50 Most Anticipated Books of 2022“,  saying, “As a follow-up to her piercing debut, GIRL AT WAR, Novic taps her own experiences as a hearing-impaired writer. …Novic strips away the platitudes associated with disability while weaving in images and idioms from American sign language. (The title alludes to ASL’s definition of ‘real talk.’) Her deft, textured prose reveals the lush interior landscapes of her characters.” — DEC. JenniferSchultz @Jennsreads, “My current read is TRUE BIZ by Sara Novic, set at a residential school for the deaf. Just started but I think this is a winner.”

GalleyChat Roundup, Jan. 2022

Tuesday, January 11th, 2022

The first chat of the new year was blazing, with nearly 250 titles mentioned. Roundups are below. To read the full chat, search Twitter by #ewgc.

EarlyWord GalleyChat, Jan, 2022 — link to spreadsheet of the titles on Google Docs. Includes excerpts from notable tweets, notes on debuts, diversity titles, those mentioned for the first time as well as LibraryReads deadlines and DRC availability. NOTE: If you have any trouble downloading the spreadsheet, please Let us know

Edelweiss catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, and links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Our next chat will be held on Thursday, Feb. 3rd, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Click here for the schedule of upcoming chats.

The next LibraryReads deadline is Feb. 1, for books publishing in March. Please give special attention to our list of diversity titles for LibraryReads consideration.

GalleyChatters’ Favorite March Diversity Titles

Sutanto, Jesse Q.
Four Aunties and a Wedding
PRH/Penguin Berkley
Fiction / Mystery & Detective

Chris @marbooks, “…a great book to start the new year of reading. The situations (and fashions) Meddy & her family find themselves in as they celebrate Meddy’s wedding to Nathan had me laughing out loud. ” — DEC, Nanette Donohue @surferrosa, “…thrilled to hear that there will be two more Meddy Chan books!” — NOV, Jenna Friebel @jenna_friebel, “…such a delightful and fun follow up to DIAL A FOR AUNTIES. Loved being with those characters again in another ridiculous situation”

Abu-Jaber, Diana
Fencing with the King
W. W. Norton
Fiction / Cultural Heritage

Louisa @llws, “A short book that begs you to linger, immersive, with a rich cast of characters.” — Norton Library Mktg @WWNortonLibrary, “Library Journal gave [it] a star: ‘A resonant and pointedly perceptive story about family, Middle East history, and creating new narratives, whether as individuals or nations.'” — OCT, Jennifer Dayton @jenniferdayton, “wonderful. Her books never fail to delight. Family returns to Jordan to reconnect with its past.” — Janet Lockhart @HartGami, “I didn’t want this book to end. The writing is sublime.”

Byeong-mo, Gu
Old Woman with the Knife
HarperCollins/Hanover Square Press
Fiction / Thrillers / Psychological

The e-newsletter dedicated to early reviews of mystery titles, First Clue, by former LJ/SLJ editors, Brian Kenny and Henrietta Verma, brought this to the attention of several GalleyChatters. From the review, “This startling work upends every stereotype of old ladies and killers. Known as Hornclaw, our protagonist is only 65 but welcomes the invisibleness of appearing elderly so as to better function as a disease control specialist: a hired killer.…The story, which immerses readers into everyday life in Seoul, is made unforgettable by Gu’s language …For lovers of literary fiction and book clubs that will try something different.”  GalleyChatter Louisa @llwsm calls it “[One of] My 2 top adult reads of the new year …short, potent literary thriller about an aging assassin, …Highly rec for fellow Smiley fans.”

Garrett, Kellye
Like a Sister
Hachette/Mulholland Books
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Amateur Sleuth

Janet Lockhart @HartGami, “[Protagonist] Lena completely rejects the idea that Desiree’s death was an overdose. She doesn’t care what it looks like, she knew her sister. Or did she? How well we know those closest to us is poignantly explored in the stellar crime novel.” — RedheadFangirl @RedheadFangirl, “Liked the Harlem setting and the insta/reality world sister vs. the student sister.” — DEC, Mara @mrlzbth, “a suspenseful read about a woman investigating the mysterious death of her reality TV star sister. I really liked the character development in this one!” — OCT, Cari Dubiel @caridubiel, “…Go get the galley now! About a young woman reckoning with her famous sister’s death…perfect for those thriller fans who are clamoring for more.”

Shepherd, Peng
Cartographers
HarperCollins/William Morrow
Fiction / Literary

Mara @mrlzbth, “I didn’t want to put down THE CARTOGRAPHERS by Peng Shepherd, the suspenseful story of a precious map with magical qualities and the people who would do anything to get their hands on it. Got to love the New York Public Library’s Map Division at the heart of the plot!” — Kimberly Mcgee @kimsbookstack, “…A secret society, magical maps and murder mystery set partially in the New York Public Library. Indiana Jones meets Brigadoon. Loved this book and tried to read it slow.” — DEC., Beth Mills @BethMills2, “…What an imaginative take in maps and map makers”  — From the Publishers Summary, “Peng (pronounced “Pung”) Shepherd is a diverse author who has lived across the globe and her writing and characters accurately reflect our complex world.”

Wilkes, Ally
All the White Spaces
S&S Atria/Emily Bestler Books
Fiction / Horror

Jenifer May @jennyjump79, “Ally Wilkes’ ALL THE WHITE SPACES has been my late night reading this past week. I feel like I’m right there with Jonathan, the young, inexperienced stowaway, on this haunted 1919 Antarctic expedition. So good and so eerie!” —  NOV, Mara @mrlzbth, “A thrilling tale of polar exploration where something sinister is lurking out there on the ice. Great use of a post-WWI setting where almost everyone is haunted by their pasts.” — SEPT, Ingram Library Services @TheLibraryLife_, “If you’re looking to grow your transgender genre collections, consider ALL THE WHITE SPACES by Ally Wilkes @UnheimlichManvr. Keywords according to the author’s twitter acct: post WW1 setting, Antarctic, ships, ghosts, death, trans.”

Williams, Sheila
Things Past Telling
HarperCollins Amistad
Fiction / Historical / Civil War Era

Kimberly Mcgee @kimsbookstack, “A sweeping saga like ROOTS. Told by a smart over 100 year old woman who doesn’t let anyone take her dignity or name away from her. Civil War historical masterpiece.” — librarylovefest @librarylovefest, “Ok, when I heard THINGS PAST TELLING launched as ‘combining the epic romance and adventure of OUTLANDER, the sweeping drama of ROOTS, and the haunting historical power of BARRACOON.’ Say no more-I’m in!!”

GalleyChat Roundup, Dec., 2021

Thursday, December 9th, 2021

Roundups of the titles from the December chat are below. To read the full chat, search Twitter by #ewgc.

And for those looking back at their favorites of the year, #Libfaves2021 runs through Dec. 17th. It began yesterday, Dec. 8, with library folk posting their top ten favorite 2021 titles, countdown style. Don’t worry if you missed the first day, you can catch up by adding the titles for the days you missed.

EarlyWord GalleyChat, Spreadsheet — link to spreadsheet of the titles on Google Docs. Includes excerpts from notable tweets, notes on debuts, diversity titles, those mentioned for the first time as well as LibraryReads deadlines and DRC availability. NOTE: If you have any trouble downloading the spreadsheet, please Let us know

Edelweiss catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, and links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Our next chat will be held on Thursday, January 6th, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Click here for the schedule of upcoming chats.

The next LibraryReads deadline is January 1st, for books publishing in February. Please give special attention to our list of diversity titles for LibraryReads consideration.

Several February titles (LR votes due Jan 1) have received heartfelt recommendations from GalleyChatters.

   

Slocumb, Brendan, The Violin Conspiracy, (PRH/Anchor, 9780593315415,  February 1, 2022)

DEBUT, Beth Mills, “…great main character, loved the classical music background.” — Jane Jorgenson, “Engrossing and heartbreaking at turns. Hero is a young black man who has to work exponentially harder to get into the world of being a classical violinist, then has his family heirloom (and extremely valuable) violin stolen.” — JenniferSchultz, “…a mystery about a Black violinist who, against all odds, creates an extraordinary violinist career, which is threatened when his priceless violin goes missing. Fascinating & gripping.” —  Mara, “…a compelling mystery, but also a fascinating look at the world of classical music and a moving tribute to the power of music education. I really enjoyed it!”

Chang, Lan Samantha, Family Chao, (W. W. Norton, 9780393868074, Feb. 1, 2022)

Mara, “Loved the character development in this story of three very different brothers thrust into the spotlight after their father’s suspicious death.”  The author is featured Booklist’s Webinar  along with Mary Roach and Glory Edim,

Black, Daniel, Don’t Cry for Me, (HarperCollins/Hanover Square Press, 9781335425737, Feb. 1, 2022)

Louisa, “Love love love DON’T CRY FOR ME! Need to remember to vote [for LibraryReads, due Jan 1] — Leslie DeLooze, “I just started DON’T CRY FOR ME by Daniel Black, and I can’t put it down. Surprising because of the serious nature of the novel. So compelling.”

March titles getting attention (LibraryReads deadline, 2/1/22)

 

Wilkes, Ally All the White Spaces (S&S Atria/Emily Bestler Books, 9781982182700, March 22, 2022)

Mara, “I’ve been raving about All The White Spaces by Ally Wilkes to anyone who will listen this month! A thrilling tale of polar exploration where something sinister is lurking out there on the ice. Great use of a post-WWI setting where almost everyone is haunted by their pasts.”

Sutanto, Jesse Q. Four Aunties and a Wedding (PRH/Penguin Berkley, 9780593440766, March 29, 2022)

Jenna Friebel, “…such a delightful and fun follow up to Dial A For Aunties. Loved being with those characters again in another ridiculous situation.”

A well-loved title originally scheduled for February, has been moved to May, giving more people time to read it before its new LibraryReads deadline, 4/1/22.

LaCour, Nina. Yerba Buena. Macmillan/Flatiron, May 31, 2022)

ADULT DEBUT — Carol Ann Tack, “I read Yerba Buena in two days and wished I hadn’t rushed through this remarkable story of love and family.” — Jenna Friebel, “If I could rave about only one novel right now, it’d be Yerba Buena by Nina LaCour. Her adult debut is like Sally Rooney in terms of character study/ relationships focus, but with the sparse yet poetic prose LaCour is known for from her YA books. And it’s queer”!

 

GalleyChat Roundup, Nov. 2021

Wednesday, November 10th, 2021

 

Roundups of the titles from the November chat are below. To read the full chat, search Twitter by #ewgc.

EarlyWord GalleyChat, Nov, 2021 — link to spreadsheet of the titles on Google Docs. Includes excerpts from notable tweets, notes on debuts, diversity titles, those mentioned for the first time as well as LibraryReads deadlines and DRC availability. NOTE: If you have any trouble downloading the spreadsheet, please Let us know

Edelweiss catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, and links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Our next chat will be held on Thursday, December 2nd, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Click here for the schedule of upcoming chats.

The next LibraryReads deadline is Dec. 1, for books publishing in January. Please give special attention to our list of diversity titles for LibraryReads consideration.

Speaking of that, one of the GalleyChatters made a special plea for two January debuts,

   

Daughter of the Moon Goddess 
Sue Lynn Tan,  HarperCollins/Harper Voyager
January 11, 2022, 9780063031302

Olga Dies Dreaming
Xochitl Gonzalez, Macmillan/ Flatiron Books
January 4, 2022, 9781250786173

Mara @mrlzbth, “Giving a shoutout to two January titles that I’ve mentioned before but love and would love to see on January’s LibraryReads list: Xochitl Gonzalez’s OLGA DIES DREAMING and Sue Lynn Tan’s DAUGHTER OF THE MOON GODDESS. Read them before December 1st and vote, vote, vote!”

GalleyChat Roundup, Oct. 2021

Monday, October 11th, 2021

 

Roundups of the titles from the October chat are below. To read the full chat, search Twitter by #ewgc.

EarlyWord GalleyChat, Oct, 2021 — link to spreadsheet of the titles on Google Docs. Includes excerpts from notable tweets, notes on debuts, diversity titles, those mentioned for the first time as well as LibraryReads deadlines and DRC availability. NOTE: If you have any trouble downloading the spreadsheet, please Let us know

Edelweiss catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, and links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Our next chat will be held on Thursday, November 4th, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Click here for the schedule of upcoming chats.

The next LibraryReads deadline is Nov. 1, for books publishing in December. Please give special attention to our list of diversity titles for LibraryReads consideration.

GALLEYCHATTER; Booking Book Group Titles

Monday, May 29th, 2017

Editors Note: Each month, librarians gather for our online GalleyChats to talk about their favorite forthcoming titles. GalleyChatter columnist Robin Beerbower rounds up the most-mentioned titles from this month’s chat below.

Click on the titles to download or request digital galleys. If you fall in love with any of these titles, remember to nominate them for  LibraryReads. Deadlines for those still eligible are noted in red.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tuesday,
June 6, 4 to 5 p.m. ET, 3:30 for virtual cocktails. Details here.
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Beach reading may be on most people’s minds, but GalleyChatters are thinking ahead to books for next year’s discussion groups. The following will provoke discussions and are so engrossing they will make it easy to ignore the siren call of the pool.

Sure Bets

In Janelle Brown’s literary suspense novel, Watch Me Disappear (PRH/Spiegel & Grau, July; RH Audio/BOT), the wife in what appears to be the perfect family never returns from a solo hike causing her husband and daughter to ride an emotional roller coaster. Kim McGee of Lake Travis (TX) Community Library is a fan saying, “After a year, Jonathan is ready to declare Billie deceased. However, some stories refuse to go quietly and father and daughter uncover some things about Billie that may reveal more than they wanted to know. The epilogue is particularly powerful and devastating, shining a light on the question, do we really know the person whom we put on a pedestal?”

Another book dealing with motherhood and secrets similar to Watch Me Disappear and Emma Donoghue’s Room is Fierce Kingdom by Gin Phillips (PRH/Viking; PRH Large Print; RH Audio/BOT; July). Andrienne Cruz of Azusa City (CA) Library says, “Joan and her son Lincoln are at the zoo when something happens. Fiercely protective of her son’s safety, Joan exposes her innermost feelings and thoughts to the reader – what do people in her situation really think and do? Filled with agonizing and tense moments, this book offers some fresh perspective to an ongoing threat in an otherwise humdrum society.”  Kim McGee adds, “It starts off with a bang (pardon the pun) and never slows down for a second. “ [Ed. Note: See our recent EarlyReads chat with the author].

Peculiar People

Joe Jones from Cuyahoga County (OH) Public Library, one of GalleyChat’s regular contributors, recommends two books with very different plots.  Spoonbenders, Daryl Gregory (PRH/Knopf, PRH Large Print; RH Audio/BOT; June), is a novel about a psychic family exposed as frauds who end up retiring from the business, but turns out teen Matty may just have a few hidden talents. According to Joe, “Throw in plenty of humor, secret government agencies, the mob, and even the Russians and we have one wild ride that keeps you guessing what crazy thing will happen next. The best part though is the characters. Each one is so well drawn and will have you experiencing the whole range of emotions as you read their stories.” Add this to your list of books about dysfunctional families.

The idea of past lives is an enticing topic in fiction and Joe discovered a twist on the theme in Reincarnation Blues by Michael Poore (PRH/Del Rey, August; LibraryReads deadline: June 20), which features a character nearing the end of his many lives. Joe says, “To achieve perfection. 10,000 chances are what the Universe gives us. Milo is in love with Death, aka Suzie. With only a handful of lives left he needs to figure it all out or face oblivion. Poor gives us a love story for the ages as Milo and Suzie tempt fate when they try to be a couple. By the time we reach the final page, we realize we knew what was coming all along and it’s truly not the end but the journey that matters. And what a journey it is!”

Debuts

Filled with memorable female characters, Molly Patterson’s Rebellion (HarperCollins/Harper, August; LibraryReads deadline: June 20), a multi-generational family novel, was applauded by Jen Dayton of Darien, collection development librarian from Darien (CT) Library. “As Hazel’s children clean out the farmhouse that their family has called home for three generations seemingly meaningless items are tossed to the side. As the story unfolds we are taken to China with a missionary aunt who never returns, witness a young woman in 1890 struggling with infertility and the loneliness of frontier life, and see a young Hazel herself coming to grips with young widowhood.”

Discussion groups that have enjoyed Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel and The Dog Stars by Peter Heller can add David Williams’ When the English Fall (Workman/Algonquin; HighBridge Audio, July) to their roster. Heather Bistyga, librarian from Anderson, SC, raved, “The aftermath of a solar storm causes the collapse of civilization, as told through the journal of an Old Order Amish man. Although better prepared than the “English” — the rest of us — to weather the destruction of the electric grid and all electrical and electronic devices, the Amish come to realize they can no longer exist as an island in the larger society. This is a worldwide disaster writ small, rendering it exquisitely powerful and quietly terrifying. “

(North) Carolina on My Mind

Another regular contributor to GalleyChat, Janet Lockhart, collection development librarian from Wake County Public Libraries, endorses two novels set in the Appalachians in her home state of North Carolina. Both appear to be book group perfection.

Leah Weiss catches the unique spirit of the mountains in her debut novel, If the Creek Don’t Rise (Sourcebooks Landmark; Recorded Books; August; LibraryReads deadline: June 20). Janet says, “The story of Sadie Blue will haunt you like the melody of mountain ballad. Trapped in a bad marriage at a very young age, Sadie has resigned herself to being unhappy until a new teacher moves to town. Kate Shaw’s arrival is the catalyst for change in the lives of residents of the small town of Baines River — including Sadie Blue.”

GalleyChat favorite Wiley Cash, author of A Land More Kind Than Home , returns with a novel inspired by true events. Janet says of The Last Ballad (HarperCollins/Morrow; HarperLuxe, October; LibraryReads deadline: August 20) “Cash shines much deserved light on the life of Ella May Wiggins, a working mother who joined the fight to unionize mill workers in the South in the 1920s. Ella May’s determination to build a better life for herself and her children is inspiring and her bravery is breathcatching. Her voice jumps off the page and this is a beautifully written story of an extraordinary woman whose struggle for dignity and social justice raises issues that still resonate today.“

Join us for the next chat on June 3 from 4:00-5:00 (ET) with virtual happy hour from 3:30-4:00, when the focus will most likely center on treasures found at Book Expo.

GalleyChat, TODAY, Tues. May 2

Tuesday, May 2nd, 2017

This month’s GalleyChat has now ended. Join us for the next one on Tues., June 6 – 4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Details here.

New Crime & Nonfiction Watchlist

Wednesday, April 26th, 2017

Editors Note: Each month, librarians gather for our online GalleyChats to talk about their favorite forthcoming titles. GalleyChatter columnist Robin Beerbower rounds up the most-mentioned titles from this month’s chat below.

Titles eligible for LibraryReads nominations are noted with deadlines in red.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, this coming Tuesday,
May 2, 4 to 5 p.m. ET, 3:30 for virtual cocktails. Details here.
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GalleyChat discussions are always fast and furious. While it’s a challenge to keep up with the feed, it’s worth it to hear about forthcoming titles librarians are eager to share. April’s chat was especially spirited with nonfiction and crime titles leading the way.

Reality Reading

Unlike reality television, which is generally anything but authentic, readers can count on the nonfiction recommended by GalleyChatters as the real thing.

Astrophysics for People in a HurryAs an astrophysicist with the American Museum of Natural History and the director of its world-famous Hayden Planetarium, Neil deGrasse Tyson knows his outer space science. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry  (Norton, May) will appeal to readers who, according to Joseph Jones from Cuyahoga County (OH) Public Library, “… don’t think they like science and just need the right book to open up their horizons.” He also says, “Tyson does a great job using humor and common sense in giving us an overview of difficult topics. More importantly he leaves out the advanced math that usually accompanies books like these making this a great choice for people who would like to know more but are afraid they cannot grasp these ideas.” This is also a LibraryReads choice for May.

Morningstar: GROWING UP WITH BOOKSFor those of us who discovered the love of reading at an early age, Ann Hood’s short memoir, Morningstar: Growing Up with Books (Norton, August; LibraryReads deadline: June 20), zoomed right into our hearts and readers will scurry to find many of the lost gems listed in this book (I’ll be searching for a copy of Robert Rimmer’s The Harrad Experiment). Marika Zemke, Head of Adult Services at Commerce Township Public Library (MI) says, “Hood writes about learning to read and how the magical powers of reading transformed her life. She’s the little girl who would rather stay indoors to read than go outside. She’s the teenage girl who experiences romantic love in a book. She’s the college student who thinks deeply about life. Simply said, Ann Hood has written a book that lovers of the written word will savor, discuss and debate.”

Arresting Thrillers

Gone to DustMatt Goldman, former writer for Seinfeld and a stand-up comedian, has created an intriguing new character in Gone to Dust (Macmillan/Forge, August; LibraryReads deadline: June 20). Set in Minneapolis and introducing Nils Shapiro, a smart and thoughtful private eye, this new series is a cross between Lee Child and Sue Grafton. Robin Nesbitt, readers’ advisor at Metropolis Columbus (OH) Library, says, “What a great read! Love Nils and hope he comes back for more mysteries! Well written, with engaging characters, mystery readers are in for a real treat.” We predict a summer hit, so have lots of copies on hand for mystery lovers.

The ForceFor grittier police action, three participants raved about The Force by Don Winslow (HarperCollins/William Morrow, June). Janet Lockhart, collection development librarian for Wake Co (NC) calls it “addictive and fast-paced,” recommended for fans of Dennis Lehane and television shows like The Wire. She adds, “NYPD Detective Denny Malone’s mission is to be a good cop but that doesn’t mean he follows the letter of the law. You’ll root for this hero, flawed at the Shakespearean level, as the choices he makes affect his family, his squad, and his soul. It’s set in a police world so convincingly detailed that you may find yourself reaching for your badge and bullet proof vest.”

The Child, BartonInvestigative journalist Kate Waters first appeared in Fiona Barton’s surprise bestseller, The Widow, and returns in The Child (PRH/Berkley, June) to investigate the discovery of a baby’s skeleton at a construction site. Three chatters found it engrossing, including Jennifer Winberry from Hunterdon County Library who says, “Three women are brought together as each, for her own reasons, tries to determine who the child is with irrevocable results for each. As inconsistencies and contradictions begin to pile up, Kate, Emma, and Angela dig further into the past and find life changing, but heart breaking, answers.”

He Said, She SaidErin Kelly wrote twisting psychological fiction long before Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl burst upon the scene, and her next book, He Said/She Said  (Macmillan/Minotaur, June), will no doubt be popular with patrons. Gregg Winsor (Kansas City Library, MO) loves it, saying, “In a year of excellent psychological fiction, this is an absolute standout. Using solar eclipses as metaphor – and actual plot device! – Kelly immerses us into a relationship between a young couple and the secrets that threaten to tear them apart. Believable characters, alternating points of view, and a feeling of simmering dread highlight this sexy smart novel.”

See What I Have Done, Schmidt“Lizzie Borden took an ax/And gave her mother forth whacks/When saw what she had done/She gave her father forty-one.” But did she really? See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt (Ingram Publishing Services/Atlantic Monthly Press, August; LibraryReads deadline: June 20) gives a different and creepy view of the incident. Jen Dayton was entranced, saying, “I have always had a morbid fascination with Lizzie Borden and this book only ended up throwing gasoline on that bonfire. Told in the alternating voices of Lizzie, her sister Emma, their Irish maid Bridget and drifter Benjamin, author Sarah Schmidt takes a story we all think we know and spins it into something new and fresh and just as terrifying as you remember.”

Palate Cleanser

Little French Bistro, Nina GeorgeAfter all of that murder and mayhem, a sweet book like Nina George’s Little French Bistro (PRH/Crown, June) is the perfect antidote. Beth Mills of New Rochelle (NY) Public Library enthuses, “Sixty-year-old Marianne has been reduced to utter hopelessness by her loveless marriage to domineering Lothar. After surviving a suicide attempt she finds herself drawn to Kerdruc in Brittany where a chance encounter lands her a job cooking at bistro An Mor. I have never been to Brittany, but Nina George made me feel that I could smell the salt air, see the little bistro, and eavesdrop as her vividly drawn characters converse. A quiet charmer.”

If you haven’t yet participated in the fun, please join us for our next GalleyChat on Tuesday, May 2, with virtual happy hour at 3:30 (ET) and the chat at 4:00, For updates on what I’m anticipating on Edelweiss, please friend me, Robin Beerbower.

GALLEYCHATTER, Page-Turners for Summer Totes

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

Each month, librarians gather for our online GalleyChats to talk about their favorite forthcoming titles. GalleyChatter columnist Robin Beerbower rounds up the most-mentioned titles from last month’s chat below.

Titles eligible for LibraryReads nominations are noted with deadlines in red.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, tomorrow, Tuesday,
April 4, 4 to 5 p.m. ET, 3:30 for virtual cocktails. Details here.
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Summer is here, at least in publishing land, and GalleyChatters recommend many new titles that will be perfect for summertime readers. Most are available as DRCs from Edelweiss, those available only from NetGalley are noted.

Nail-Biting Thrillers

break-downTopping many lists this month (including mine) was the perfect domestic thriller, The Breakdown by B. A. Paris (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, July; DRC on NetGalleyLibraryReads deadline: May 20). Cass’s brewing personal breakdown is not only the result of her early onset dementia symptoms but also guilt over bypassing a car breakdown on a rainy night only to discover later the occupant was murdered. This “tilt-a-whirl” of a plot will keep readers guessing. Andrienne Cruz says it’s “maddingly awesome.” Jennifer Winberry adds, “High tension and an urgency to the narrative keeps pages turning to the shocking conclusion in this second novel from the author of Behind Closed Doors.” This is perfect for readers who liked A.S.A. Harrison’s The Silent Wife and Clare Mackintosh’s thrillers.

9780062473615_b8d28With its lighter tone than most recent thrillers, readers who can’t get enough of Mary Higgins Clark will enjoy Hallie Ephron’s You’ll Never Know, Dear (HarperCollins/Morrow, May). Susan Balla (Fairfield County Library, CT) gave it a nice shout out, saying, “A freak accident that injures her mother and grandmother brings Vanessa back to her childhood home and straight into a family mystery. Kidnapping, deception and revenge all have a place in this novel. Oh, and dolls. Lifelike porcelain dolls. Made with real hair and made to resemble their owners. This is creepy but not over the top.”

final-girslWith a cover blurb from Stephen King, “The first great thriller of 2017 is here,” the novel Final Girls by Riley Sager (PRH/Dutton, July; LibraryReads deadline: May 20), has a lot to live up to, but GalleyChatters are also enthusiastic, saying this suspense thriller with a bit of horror will appeal to those who like Karin Slaughter and Chevy Stevens. Andrienne Cruz from Azusa City (CA) Library said, “Slow buildup and picks up fast, this is a satisfying take on the slasher movies that were popular in the 90s with a twist that will astound.”

9781250099778_2eb71Readers who are biting their nails waiting for the next Diana Gabaldon title may temporarily quench their longing by reading The Fortune Teller by Gwendolyn Womack (Macmillan/Picador, June; LibraryReads deadline: April 20). With dual timelines, one present and one ancient, this book involving antiquities, ancient libraries, librarians, tarot cards, suspense, and a mysterious love interest is perfect beach reading.

Family Dysfunction

9780307959577_b30abJ. Courtney Sullivan’s previous books, Maine and The Engagements, were popular, and early praise indicates Saints for All Occasions (PRH/Knopf, May) could be another heart-tugging winner. Jen Dayton, collection development librarian from Darien (CT) Library, didn’t want it to end and admits she still thinks about it and continues, “Families and the secrets they keep is what this book is all about. When an untimely death brings the sisters together for the first time in many years, will the closely guarded and potentially life altering secrets come to light? I loved this novel about how families make do with what they are given and learn to love in spite of it.”

9781501157783_41f0dOne of the first books to receive a solid entry on my best of 2017 list is Laura McBride’s ‘Round Midnight (S&S/Touchstone, May), a novel set in Las Vegas with multiple points-of-view. Janet Lockhart says it best, “Spanning six decades, against the transformation of Las Vegas from a dusty desert town into a glittering tourist mecca, this is the tale of four women whose lives intersect in unexpected ways.  A big-hearted story with small and large emotional payoffs, it is recommended for fans of Anna Quindlen, Fredrik Backman, and Ann Patchett.” I would add Wally Lamb readers to Janet’s list.

Novel Nonfiction

9780062664327_c2581One of my favorite travel narrative/memoir combos of 2017 is Tim Bauerschmidt’s Driving Miss Norma: One Family’s Journey Saying “Yes” to Living (HarperCollins/HarperOne, May). Heather Bistyga, ILL/Periodicals Librarian from Anderson, SC, also loved it, “Driving Miss Norma is the heartwarming story of a 90-year-old woman who was brave enough to say ‘no’ to medical treatment for cancer, and the family brave enough to take her on the road for the adventure of a lifetime before she was able to die with dignity. I laughed and cried with Tim, Ramie, Miss Norma and Ringo [the family dog] on their trip around the country, and I hope to have the courage to support my loved ones as Norma’s family supported her.” Yes, you may ugly cry but you won’t forget Norma.

9781250080547_b4d09-2Finally, a word to the wise, stock up on The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich (Macmillan/Flatiron; May), It is a readers’ advisors’ dream. An intimate memoir, it’s a compelling and page-turning true crime that legal thriller fans will love. If that isn’t enough, it is also beautifully written. Andrienne Cruz said it was “harrowing – devastating, resolute, meticulous, gut-wrenching and masterful.”

Please join us for the next GalleyChat on Tuesday, April 4, with virtual happy hour at 3:30 (ET) and the chat at 4:00, For updates on what I’m anticipating on Edelweiss, please friend me, Robin Beerbower.

GalleyChat, Tues. March 7

Tuesday, March 7th, 2017

This chat has ended. Join us for the next one on Tuesday, April 4, from 4 to 5 pm, ET. Details here.

GALLEYCHATTERS Spring into Summer

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

Every month, librarians gather for our online GalleyChats to talk about their favorite ARCs. Our GalleyChatter columnist Robin Beerbower rounds up the most-mentioned titles from the latest chat below.

Some of these titles can still be nominated for LibraryReads. We’ve noted the deadlines in red.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, this coming Tuesday,
March 7, 4 to 5 p.m. ET, 3:30 for virtual cocktails. Details here.
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Spring titles were still galvanizing librarians during the February chat, but several May titles also got attention. Most of these are available as Digital ARCs. Look for them on Edelweiss or NetGalley.

If you need even more titles to choose from, check our compilation of all 160 titles mentioned here as well as a transcript of the chat.

Nonfiction for Novel Lovers

Nonfiction stories where the pages almost turn themselves are always popular with patrons and two good contenders were offered in February’s GalleyChat.

Killers of the Flower MoonThe Lost City of Z by David Grann was a big success as a book and is shaping up to be at least as successful in the movie version, set to open April 24 in the US.  He has another winner on his hands with another true story, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI (PRH/Doubleday, April). Movie rights to it were sold last year in a bidding war called by Deadline, “the biggest and wildest book rights auction in memory.”  The book is getting “much love” from 24 Edelweiss peers. Collection development librarian P.J. Gardiner,  Wake County (NC) Public Libraries, agrees, saying, “Why are so many Osage Native Americans dying in Oklahoma? It is the 1920s in rich oil country and local law enforcement cannot explain why some of the country’s most wealthy residents are dying at alarming rates and from an array of causes. J. Edgar Hoover, head of the newly created FBI, sends Tom White to investigate. What he finds is a tangled mess of racism, swindling, and lots of people willing to look the other way.”

Radium GirlsReaders who hunger for more true history like Hidden Figures (Margot Lee Shetterly) will want to read Kate Moore’s Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women (Sourcebooks, May; LibraryReads deadline: March 20), the story of women during WWI working the coveted jobs of painting clock-faces only to start dying from radium poisoning. Nicole Steeves, Fox River Grove (IL) Library director said the elements are perfect for readers’ advisory (readable non-fiction, women’s stories, and science writing) and would also recommend it to teens. She added, “It is also is a timely example of good research and careful attribution, relevant to librarians’ concerns about news literacy.”

Classic Mystery Redux

Magpie MurdersLibrarians are crazy about Anthony Horowitz’s The Magpie Murders (Harper, May; LibraryReads deadline: March 20), a cleverly assembled homage to classic country house whodunnits. Joseph Jones from Cuyahoga County (OH) Public Library says, “Mystery readers are in for a treat. We get not only one mystery to solve, but two as we get a book within a book; each having its own story. Each mystery was very well done with good characters and plenty of red herrings which kept me guessing until the end. A fun story for fans of locked room mysteries in the style of Agatha Christie.” Another librarian’s crystal ball predicts this could be the break-out hit of the summer.

Domestic Novels

Stars Are FireIt’s been four long years since readers have had a new novel by Anita Shreve and we are excited that The Stars are Fire (PRH/Knopf, April) is worth the wait. Based on Maine’s Great Fires of 1947, a young mother and her children have to start over after the death of her husband. Jennifer Dayton from Darien Library was smitten saying, “When the fire destroys everything that Grace has in the world, she is forced to reinvent her life and the lives of her children. And it is just when things look at their rosiest that her world is upended again. This story will have you rooting for Grace and her happiness long after you turn the last page.”

I Found YouReaders who have read all of Liane Moriarty’s novels will want to try Lisa Jewell’s  I Found You (S&S/Atria, April). Set in a seaside English town, a single mother, a man with amnesia, and an abandoned wife all collide in a nail-biting climax. Readers of Clare Macintosh’s I Let You Go and Catherine McKenzie’s Fractured will enjoy the suspense and good character development.

Debuts

SycamoreGalleyChatters love to read and promote good debuts and Sycamore by Bryn Chancellor (Harper, May; LibraryReads deadline: March 20), set in the sizzling mid-state desert of Arizona, is an easy one to recommend to anyone who wants an atmospheric coming-of-age novel. Kelly Currie from Delphi Public Library said “With a multitude of fully developed characters, multiple points of view, and a suspense-laden plot, Sycamore offers something to satisfy every reader. You will find humor and sorrow aplenty in this very well written story. “

Ginny MoonAt least three GalleyChatters raved about the intriguing new novel Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig (HarperCollins/Park Row Books, May; LibraryReads deadline: March 20), a moving story of a 14-year-old autistic teen who although recently adopted by a loving family, is desperate to return to her violence ridden life with her birth mother. Janet Lockhart was enthusiastic about this saying,  “Ginny Moon has a mission: to find her Baby Doll and make sure she is safe. Her problem? No one understands Ginny’s concern is for an actual, not an imaginary child. Ludwig has created a character whose voice leaps off the page. By turns engaging and infuriating, she is always true to herself — and to Baby Doll.”

Please join us for the next GalleyChat on Tuesday, March 7, with virtual happy hour at 3:30 (ET) and the chat at 4:00, and for updates on what I’m anticipating on Edelweiss, please friend me.

GalleyChat, Tues. Feb. 7

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Add to your TBR pile with the recommendations from the February GalleyChat, below.

Join us for next month’s chat on Tuesday, March 7, 4 to 5 p.m. EDT (3:30 for virtual cocktails), #ewgc.