EarlyWord

News for Collection Development and Readers Advisory Librarians

Meet Stephanie Powell Watts,
ALA Book Club’s Inaugural Pick

Cuyahoga Public Library hosted  Stephanie Powell Watts in a Facebook Live chat on Wednesday. If you missed it, you can watch the video here (be sure to follow Cuyahoga County Public Library on Facebook first).

More on the book and author, below:

Reviews (rated an overall RAVE from BookMarks)

NPR interview with the author

YA/MG GalleyChat, Begins Soon, 4 to 5 p.m.

Join us today to find out which YA and Middle Grade galleys fellow librarians are loving – 4 to 5 p.m. Eastern (3:30 for virtual cocktails) — #ewgcya

Follow along below, and add your comments by clicking on the blue button at the bottom (it will enter #ewgcya for you automatically), or use your favorite Twitter dashboard (such as TweetChat).

Women Authors Rule Hugo Awards

The best novel winner and nominees for the Hugo Award, announced today, below:

Winner — The Obelisk Gate, N. K. Jemisin, (Hachette/Orbit) — this is the second Hugo in a row for the author. She won for The Fifth Season (Hachette/Orbit) last year. They are the first two titles in a trilogy. The final, The Stone Sky, is set for release next week.

All the Birds in the Sky, Charlie Jane Anders, (Macmillan/Tor) — this won the Nebula this year

A Closed and Common Orbit, Becky Chambers, (HarperVoyager)

Death’s End, Cixin Liu, (Macmillan/Tor) — the author won the Hugo in 2015

Ninefox Gambit, Yoon Ha Lee, (S&S/Solaris)

Too Like the Lightning, Ada Palmer, (Macmillan/Tor)

Winners and nominees in all the other categories, here.

Movie/TV Adaptations, Updates

Although EarlyWord is no longer publishing on a daily basis, we continue to update the resources listed on the right

Since July 3rd, we have added new information on 60 projects to our spreadsheet of Upcoming Movies & TV Based on Books. Download a spreadsheet to browse just the newest lists here, Adaptation Updates.

The most intriguing book and TV news doesn’t appear on that list, however, since it’s not an adaptation. It’s PBS’s announcement last week of “The Great American Read” (working title), an eight-part series, with the ambitious goal of getting people to vote for  “America’s Best Loved Book,” set to kick off in May, 2018

Also not based on a book, but arriving with several tie-ins, as well as plenty of display opportunities, is Ken Burns’s documentary The Vietnam War which debuts on PBS on 9/17/17 (included in our catalog of tie-ins here).

GalleyChat, Aug. 1, Transcript

Below is an edited version of yesterday’s GalleyChat. We’ve reorganized the tweets to make it easier to follow the discussion and added links to each title. UPDATE: If you get the dreaded spinning wheel in the widget below, try this link.

Click here for an Edelweiss catalog of the titles that were discussed.

The next GalleyChat is on September 5th, the day after Labor Day (don’t get distracted by the holiday, put it on your calendars)

YA/MG Galley chat is on August 15. Details on joining each chat are here.

Booker 17 Longlist

The Booker longlist, announced today, is “thronged with literary titans, whose combined trophy cabinet would include the Pulitzer, the Costa, the Baileys, the Folio, the Impac and the Goldsmiths prizes,” notes the Guardian, but it also manages to squeeze in three debut novels.

Nine of the thirteen titles are available in the US, three are scheduled for release later this year. A fourth, Elmet by Fiona Mozley, does not yet have a US publisher.

Download a spreadsheet with US publication information here, Booker Longlist 2017.

YA/MG GalleyChat,Tues. July 18

Today’s YA/MG GalleyChat has ended. Below is the transcript. If the widget does not load, try this link.

Link here to the Edelweiss catalog of titles mentioned.

Join us for the next chat on Tuesday, August 15, 4 to 5 pm (3:30 for virtual cocktails. Virgin, of course).

GalleyChat, Tues. July 11

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tuesday, August 1, 4 to 5 p.m., ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails!)

More info on how to join here.

Below is an edited transcript of the chat. UPDATE: If the widget does not load, try this link.

A Word from EarlyWord

UPDATE: Thanks for the wonderful comments and best wishes. We are thrilled and humbled. 

This is our final EarlyWord post. Over the last nine years, we have enjoyed your support and enthusiasm for EarlyWord.com.

We will continue the EarlyWord GalleyChats and invite you to join us for the Adult chat on Tuesday, July 11th and the YA/Middle Grade chat on July 18th.

We have dozens of people to thank for EarlyWord‘s existence, most importantly, our readers. You dazzle us every day with your dedication to helping people discover books and become lifelong readers.

EarlyWord could not have gotten off the ground without our co-founder and “spiritual guru,” Fred Ciporen. Thanks to you, Chris Kahn for helping our advertisers craft creative and meaningful promotions. Thanks to Robin Beerbower and all the GalleyChatters for spotting forthcoming titles we should all read. You’ve had an amazing track record in putting the “early” into EarlyWord. Also thanks to kids contributors Lisa Von Drasek and to JoAnn Jonas, who enthusiastically moderated over 40 chats with middle-grade and YA authors. Our web designer, Chris Andreola of adcSTUDIO created a site that pleases us each time we look at it, which is saying a lot, considering how many times a day we go to it.

A special thanks to the library marketers at the publishing companies that have supported us. It’s been a joy to get to know you and I hope we have served our mission as the “Publisher Librarian Connection.”

As I’ve said many times before, “Keep on Reading!”

Nora

Nora Rawlinson
Co-Founder and Editor

Towards a More Diverse LibraryReads

UPDATE: Just added, the Penguin Random House diversity catalog.

A recent story on Book Riot pointed out a lack of diversity among the LibraryReads picks. To help librarians discover titles by a wider range of authors, we asked library marketers at the various publishing houses to put together what we call, for the lack of a better term, “diversity catalogs” of titles eligible for LibraryReads nominations. We have posted the ones we’ve received so far in the links at the right and will add more as we receive them.

What better time than the Fourth of July holiday to celebrate diversity? Highlighted below are titles available to download now and one to request:

  

The City of Brass, S A. Chakrabortty, (HarperCollins/ Harper Voyager)

A debut fantasy that interweaves aspects of Muslim culture. HarperCollins Voyager imprint is one to look to, as they declare themselves “committed to introducing a new wave of diverse voices and intriguing stories that push the boundaries of science fiction and fantasy for the 21st century.”  Listen to the Book Buzz description here. See the full HarperCollins diversity catalog here.

The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao, Martha Batalha, translated by Eric M. B. Becker (Oneworld Publications, dist. by IPG)

Originally published in Brazil, it is described by the publisher as “A darkly comic portrait of two rebellious sisters in 1940s Rio de Janeiro that illuminates contemporary issues of feminism and domestic equality. ” It is published by independent publisher Oneworld Publications, which focuses on “diverse cultures and historical events.” Recently profiled in the Guardian, the 30-year-old company is based in Oxford, U.K., and opened offices in New York in 2009. Its titles are distributed in the US via Publishers Group West [Note: this is a correction. Previously, we incorrectly identified the distributor as IPG]. See the full IPG/PGW diversity catalog here.

Real American: A Memoir, Julie Lythcott-Haims, (Macmillan/Holt)

Called a “bold, impassioned memoir that explores the emotional and cultural divide imposed by American racism on people of mixed race” by Publishers Weekly, this is by the author of the best-selling anti-helicopter parenting book, How to Raise an Adult. Full Macmillan diversity catalog here.

Dogs at the Perimeter, Madeleine Thien, (Norton, Original Trade Pbk; Recorded Books)

Chinese-Canadian Thien’s novel Do Not Say We Have Nothing (Norton; Recorded Books; OverDrive Sample) was a finalist for the Man Booker and swept Canada’s literary awards. This, her third novel, available for the first time in the U.S., is about Cambodian refugees dealing with past traumas. It received strong reviews when it was published in the UK in 2012, including The Economist, which noted, “The strife in Indo-China has inspired some astonishing writing in recent decades, both fiction and non-fiction. Dogs at the Perimeter belongs with the best of such works.” Like the other titles in the Norton diversity catalog, it is available by request.

We’re Going To Need More Wine, Gabrielle Union, (HarperCollins/Dey Street).

We mentioned this collection of essays by the actress and activist in our earlier post, noting her heartfelt tribute to libraries during a panel at Book Expo.

It’s now available to download.

Hitting Screens, Week of July 3, 2017

Only one film opens this week but it is expected to be a blockbuster, Spider-Man: Homecoming.

Fans of the Captain America: Civil War movie already got a look at the new Spidey played by Tom Holland; he stole every scene he was in.

Now Holland gets his own film, one The Verge describes as “a joyous celebration, not just of the MCU’s [Marvel Comic Universe] usual crowd-winning balance of humor and action, but of a little guy’s ability to make a difference, even when, for once, the fate of the world isn’t on the line.”

Reviews are generally strong. Vanity Fair says it is a film of “easy, abounding charm” that makes viewers want even more to follow. The Guardian calls it a “razor-sharp reboot” and “a crowd-pleasing triumph.” io9 says it is “great” and USA Today calls it “remarkable and refreshing.”

Not all the reviews are glowing but most acknowledge its pleasures. Entertainment Weekly, in its B+ review, says “Homecoming comes off as loose and sweet and light on its feet.” The NYT says it is “likable, amusing.” Most critical, The Hollywood Reporter writes it is “occasionally exciting but often frustrating … a creative misstep for the studio.”

There have been five previous films since 2002, each making less money than the one before. Marvel clearly hopes this is the reboot that puts the character and the franchise back on track. Polygon reports that the film launches a trilogy. The next stand-alone feature will be July 5, 2019. Before that the webbed crusader will appear in Avengers: Infinity War.

Spider-Man: Homecoming premieres July 7th. It stars Holland along with Michael Keaton, Jon Favreau, Zendaya, Donald Glover, Tyne Daly, Marisa Tomei, and Robert Downey Jr. Several tie-ins are out, see our posts here and here.

THE WINDFALL: Getting Attention

Diksha Basu’s debut novel, The Windfall (PRH/Crown; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample) is attracting notable attention.

TV rights were optioned in March, reports Deadline Hollywood and now that it is has been published, the NYT covers the author twice. Taking a break from her nonfiction duties, NYT reviewer Jennifer Senior writes the novel tells “a story that’s the stuff of Amartya Sen’s worst nightmares and Tom Wolfe’s sweetest dreams.” The paper also has a feature on the Basu’s “Sunday Routine.

As part of its “Culture Index” RollingStone says it is one of the “Seven things you should check out this week.” HuffPost lists it as one of “12 Great New Books To Bring To The Beach This Summer” while Bustle names it one of “15 Uplifting Books That Will Soothe Your Soul In Dark Times.” Elle reviews, writing “The Windfall explores the effects of generational, gender, and class differences. Through her detailed descriptions of family meals, dusty floors, and ostentatious outfits, Basu gives us a full snapshot of a community’s life in contemporary India.”

PW stars, calling it a “charming, funny debut.” It is a July Indie Next pick.

NPR interviews the author on Weekend Edition Sunday, calling her novel “a delightful comedy of errors where [the characters] navigate the unexpected pressures and pleasures of newfound wealth in modern India.”

The Breakfast Club Meets Murder Mystery

Making its debut at No.5 on the NYT Young Adult Hardcover list this week is One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus (PRH/Delacorte Press; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample),

Calling it “The Breakfast Club meets murder mystery,” Entertainment Weekly gives it a B+ and says “McManus knows how to plot out a mystery, but the real charm of the novel lies in the journey each of the characters goes on … [a] pretty stellar summer read.”

Kirkus says the “fast-paced blend of Gossip Girl, Pretty Little Liars, and classic John Hughes will leave readers racing to the finish as they try to unravel the mystery on their own.”

It has made a number of lists.

Seventeen names it “20 of the Best YA Books of 2017.”

Entertainment Weekly puts it on three of their lists:

Bustle lists it three times as well:

Holds at most libraries we checked are topping 3:1.

Titles to Know and Recommend, Week of July 3, 2017

Even the Fourth of July holiday won’t prevent books from shipping next week. Julie Garwood’s Wired (see below, under “Peer Picks”) is one of several titles with a July 4 publication date.

The titles covered in this column, and several other notable titles arriving next week, are listed with ordering information and alternate formats on our downloadable spreadsheet, EarlyWord New Title Radar Week of July 3, 2017.

Media Magnets

Woolly, Ben Mezrich (S&S/Atria; S&S Audio).

Author Mezrich has covered several wild topics, but none quite as woolly as this, to be featured this week on CBS Sunday Morning. Picked by USA Today as one of “10 Hot Books You Won’t Want To Miss This Summer,” it is described as a “Real-life thriller [that] goes inside the Harvard lab of geneticist George Church as he and his team attempt to ‘resurrect’ the extinct Woolly Mammoth.” Mezrich’s The Accidental Billionaires was the basis for the successful movie The Social Network. Fox has the film rights to this one.

Media Picks

Persons Unknown, Susie Steiner (PRH/Random House; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample).

People magazine’s “Book of the Week” in the new issue, noting, “Steiner (Missing, Presumed) populates this hot-button narrative with achingly human characters, but no one compares to the [pregnant] hormonal, mordantly funny mom-cop who will stop at nothing to save her son.”

Peer Picks

One LibraryReads pick comes out this week:

Wired, Julie Garwood (PRH/Berkley; OverDrive Sample).

“When Agent Liam Scott recruits a beautiful hacker, Allison Trent, to find a leak within the FBI, he uses her cousin’s criminal record as leverage. As they try to deny their growing attraction, the computer program Allison developed is stolen. Liam helps track down the thief while protecting her from continual harassment and attempts on her life. I genuinely enjoyed reading this novel. The whole book was tightly plotted and well written. This is a story I would highly recommend to romance readers, especially those new to the genre.” — Maria Gruener, Watertown Regional Library, Watertown, SD

Four Indie Next selections hit shelves as well:

Made for Love, Alissa Nutting (HC/Ecco; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample).

“I don’t think I’ve gotten this much sheer pleasure from a book in a long while. Made for Love is freaking off-the-wall bonkers in the best way. We follow Hazel, a woman on the edge who recently escaped from her top-of-the-tech-world psycho of a husband (whom, she fears, desires to place a chip in her brain so that they may ‘meld’ consciousnesses), as she battles through hyper-surveillance for a life off the grid. Along the way, she meets a truly delightful cast of characters, gets into some absurd hijinks, and works through the piles of garbage the world has tossed her way. Ditch the jet skis — this is all the summer fun you’re going to need.” —Molly Moore, BookPeople, Austin, TX

Additional Buzz: It is on a number of summer reading lists including those complied by Real Simple, Literary Hub, Cosmopolitan, New York magazine, HuffPost, Nylon, and Refinery29. BuzzFeed features it on this year’s “Most Exciting Books Coming In 2017” and their “Exciting New Books You Need To Read This Summer” lists. The Rumpus reviews, calling it “hilarious, madcap.”

The Reason You’re Alive, Matthew Quick (HC/Harper; HarperLuxe; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample).

“David Granger is a 68-year-old, conservative war veteran with a bleeding-heart liberal son, a granddaughter who needs him, and a whole lot of emotional baggage from his time in Vietnam. He is patriotic and brash, and he has no problem expressing his opinion. In our current politically divided culture, where people with different views struggle to understand each other, this story has incredible value. I wanted to dislike this protagonist, whose views are so different from my own, but I couldn’t. He was kind and caring and his story pulled at my heart.” —Melanie Locke, Old Firehouse Books, Fort Collins, CO

Additional Buzz: A movie is in the works according to The Hollywood Reporter; Miramax bought film rights almost a year ago.

The Graybar Hotel: Stories, Curtis Dawkins (S&S/Scribner; S&S Audio).

“Discard the thought that Curtis Dawkins is serving a life sentence and insert the thought that this is an amazing short-story collection by a debut author. In The Graybar Hotel, we glimpse the emotional lives of the inmates of a Kalamazoo prison, who are cut off from the world and in a place where time moves and sounds different than before. One character calls random numbers just so he can hear a voice or any noise for his allotted 15 minutes, anything to connect to the outside world again. The Graybar Hotel reminded me of reading early Denis Johnson, in the way that the writing is so sparse I fell right into the stories and suffered along with the inmates. A captivating read that allowed me a glimpse of the humanity of prison life.” —Jason Kennedy, Boswell Book Company, Milwaukee, WI

South Pole Station, Ashley Shelby (Macmillan/Picador; OverDrive Sample).

“Prepare yourself for a frozen and fun adventure in the Antarctic. Cooper Gosling apparently does not have enough cold weather or oddball people in her Minneapolis life, so she heads to the South Pole Station to try to reclaim her career as a painter. Ashley Shelby has collected a wonderful cast of quirky characters in this southernmost ice box and readers are in for a treat when they meet this bunch of scientists, artists, medics, and misfits. Bundle up and enjoy the ride!” —Pamela Klinger-Horn, Excelsior Bay Books, Excelsior, MN

Tie-ins

Midnight, Texas, a mid-summer debut TV series premiering on NBC July 25, gets its tie-in this week, Midnight Crossroad (TV Tie-In) by Charlaine Harris (PRH/Ace; OverDrive Sample).

It is the first book in Harris’s Midnight, Texas series, followed by Day Shift (PRH/Ace, 2015; Recorded Books; OverDrive Sample) and Night Shift (PRH/Ace, 2016; Recorded Books; OverDrive Sample).

Bustle calls the world of the books “Twin Peaks with vampires.” See our earlier post for full cast details and a plot summary.

For our full list of upcoming adaptations, download our Books to Movies and TV and link to our listing of tie-ins.

Pearl Power, Summer Reads

“Librarian’s librarian” Nancy Pearl gives a boost to several titles on NPR’s Morning Edition this week, picking her favorite books from the spring list for summer reading.

Host Steve Inskeep begins by asking if the prolific reader is have any trouble focusing on books “in these news saturated times.” Pearl admits that she she finds her reading tastes are changing and she has abandoned her usual favorites, character-driven stories for page-turners

Her favorite is the debut, August Snow, (Soho Crime; Recorded Books). She says, “I’m not just saying that because I’m from Detroit and it’s set in Detroit.”

Prepub reviews dunned the book for veering into thriller cliches, but Kirkus noted, “it’s easy to overlook those flaws considering what this book gets right: a hugely likable hero who uses his wealth to bring his neighborhood back to life; a feel for the vitality and pride in run-down urban neighborhoods as good as George Pelecanos on Washington, D.C.; appealing supporting characters who give life to the book’s theme of the solace to be found in communities. It adds up to a very pleasurable read.”

By the end of the program, Inskeep observes, “we started out trying to get away from the news, but we’re actually getting fresh perspectives on the news of recent years … from urban struggle to rural areas that are losing population and economic vitality.”

Click here for the full list of titles and annotations.