EarlyWord

News for Collection Development and Readers Advisory Librarians

James Franco Explores
THE DISASTER ARTIST

The “Citizen Kane of bad movies” is the inspiration for James Franco’s latest film The Disaster Artist, opening in theaters tomorrow.

Titled The Room (not to be confused with Room, starring Brie Larson), it made only $1,800 in its opening week, but went on to become a cult hit.

Franco’s movie takes its name from a book by one of the actors in the film, Greg Sestero, The Disaster Artist, written with journalist Tom Bissell. It has been released as a movie tie-in.

Franco tells Terry Gross on Fresh Air that his movie could not have been made without the background provided by the book.

Libraries are showing holds on the book, but many more on the film itself. A Blu-Ray version was released in 2013

This faux trailer gives a sense of the movie:

 

#Libfaves17, Day Two

Yesterday was the first day of #libfaves17 and it was a hit:

Tweet your favorites today, using hashtag #libfaves17. Please type titles in all caps, to make them stand out. If you didn’t join in yesterday, no worries, you can play catch up by tweeting two titles today.

Below is a roundup of yesterday’s tweets. If it doesn’t load, or if you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

GalleyChat, TODAY, Tues. Dec. 5

Join us today to learn about the galleys fellow librarians are loving – 4 to 5 p.m. EDT (3:30 for virtual cocktails)

Follow along below, and add your comments in the window at the bottom (it will enter #ewgc for you automatically), or use your favorite Twitter browser, like TweetDeck. Refresh the page to see new tweets.

#LibFaves17, Day One

It’s a big week for tweeting favorite books. The #libfaves countdown of librarians’ favorite books of the year begins today and runs through Dec. 14. The rules are simple, tweet one favorite a day, using all caps for TITLES and hashtag #libfaves17 (or, use the button below).

Tomorrow, librarians discuss their favorites upcoming books during GalleyChat, 4 to 5 pm, #ewgc.

Libfaves Returns!

Dozens of best books lists have appeared (see our links at right), including LibraryReads Favorites of Favorites, just released today.

But you can still get your own favorites recognized, via #libfaves17. The rules are simple — tweet your ten favorite titles of the year, one per day, beginning on Monday. We’ll round up all the titles after tweeting wraps on Dec. 14.

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues. Nov. 21

Join us today to find out which YA and Middle Grade galleys fellow librarians are loving – 4 to 5 p.m. Eastern (3:30 for virtual cocktails) — #ewgcya

Follow along below, and add your comments by clicking on the blue button at the bottom (it will enter #ewgcya for you automatically), or use your favorite Twitter dashboard (such as TweetChat).

Adaptations Update:
What Is a Movie?

Hollywood is grappling with many upheavals, including a fundamental question, what makes a movie a movie. As streaming services grow and develop their own original films, should a “movie” still be defined as having been made for theaters? The Motion Picture Academy has assigned a committee to study whether to change their requirement that a movie opens in at least a limited number of theaters to qualify for Oscar nominations. Meanwhile, Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos, who announced plans to release 80 movies next year, is campaigning hard to be released from that charade.

Meanwhile, Netflix may win its first feature film Oscar for the adaptation of Hilary Jordan’s Mudbound, which opened, in a limited number of theaters, of course, last week.

It’s been a depressing year at the box office, so Hollywood is particularly hopeful that families will hit the multiplexes this Thanksgiving weekend. The animated Disney feature Coco is expected to be a hit, and may even knock the superhero adaptation Justice League out of first place. The Day of the Dead themed movie is not an adaptation, but there are tie-ins (see our list). The look of the movie draws on the work of Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada, who is featured in the Sibert-winning book, Funny Bones — Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras, (Abrams, 2015).

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, link to our Movies & TV Based on Books collection. To browse the most recent updates, download EarlyWord Adaptations-UPDATES 10/19 thru 11/20/17. Among the highlights:

Death on the Nile — following the success of Murder on the Orient Express, Kenneth Branagh is planning to direct a new adaptation of Agatha Christie’s classic and again star as Hercule Poirot

Adaptations of several other classics have also been announced:

Catch 22 — Joseph Heller’s satire has been optioned for a TV series, directed by and starring George Clooney

If Beale Street Could Talk  — Filming has begun on this adaptation of James Baldwin’s 1974 novel

Lord Of The Rings — Optioned for an Amazon series

Invisible Man — Hulu is in the early stages of development of a series based on Ralph Ellison’s ground-breaking 1952 novel

The Painted Bird — Jerzy Kosinski’s 1965 anti-war novel has been optioned for a film

White Fang — Jack London’s 1908 classic is in development as an animated feature

Welcome, BookPulse

For those who are  missing EarlyWord‘s daily book news coverage, there’s a new resource in town, Library Journal‘s “Book Pulse” column by Neal Wyatt, with the goal to “help collection development and readers’ advisory librarians navigate the never-ending wave of new books and book news.”

And that it does. Dozens of links each day offer a quick but thoughtful round up of the book coverage that will generate holds lists and give librarians new titles to recommend. Wyatt’s passion for readers advisory work and collection development shine through each day.

If you like what you see, be sure to let LJ know in the comments section and sign up to get “Book Pulse” alerts via email.

National Book Awards
Stream Live TONIGHT

UPDATE: NPR’s report on the National Book Awards is here.

Watch the National Book Awards, hosted by Cynthia Nixon, live tonight on the National Book Foundation’s site.

The event is scheduled to begin at 7:20 ET, when Bill Clinton presents the Literarian Award to Dick Robinson, CEO of Scholastic, followed by Anne Hathaway presenting Annie Proulx with the Foundation’s lifetime achievement award. After a break for dinner, the book awards get rolling around 9:20 pm.

To play along, download the ballot here.

GalleyChat Looks to
Spring/Summer Hits

 

A glimpse of Spring/Summer 2018 season appeared among the titles mentioned during the November GalleyChat. Several titles carry over from previous chats, particularly A.J. Finn’s domestic thriller, The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, January 2, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 11/20/17), It leads the list in terms of “Much Love” designations on Edelweiss, with 132. (Note: read our chat with the author below).

Attesting to the enduring appeal of the genre, another domestic thriller, Peter Swanson’s April title, All the Beautiful Lies, (HarperCollins/Morrow, April 3, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 2/20/17) already has 76 “Much Love” comments.

Among the titles receiving particular GalleyChat passion is Tara Westover’s debut memoir, Educated, (PRH/Random House, February 20, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 12/20/17). By a woman who grew up in an abusive home, it is described as the “2018 version of Glass Castle.”

Below is a Storify version of the chat. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

For a list of all the titles, check our Edelweiss catalog,

Join us for our next chat, Tues., Dec. 5,  4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Details here.

Carnegie Finalists Announced

The finalists for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction were announced today, three titles each, down from longlists of 25 in fiction and 21 in nonfiction.

The winners will be announced at ALA Midwinter in Denver

Fiction

   

Jennifer Egan, Manhattan Beach, (S&S/Scribner)

LibraryReads selection, October

“Anna and her father Eddie arrive at the home of Dexter Styles on Manhattan Beach searching for a job during the Depression. After Eddie goes missing five years later, Anna supports her mother and sister by working at the Brooklyn Naval Yard. One night, Anna approaches Styles for information about her father. They become involved, but he is still marked by his past relationship with Eddie. Egan’s description of New York in the 30s and 40s is so immersive that you feel like you’re waking up when you have to put the book down.” — Barbara Birenbaum, Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, CA

Reviews, Book Marks, “Positive,” based on 31 reviews

George Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo, (PRH/Random House)

Winner of the Man Booker Prize

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave” based on 42 reviews

Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing, (S&S/Scribner)

National Book Awards, Shortlist

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave,” based on 27 reviews

 

Nonfiction

   

Sherman Alexie, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir, (Hachette/Little, Brown)

Reviews, Book Marks, “Positive,” based on 12 reviews

Daniel Ellsberg, The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner, (Macmillan/Bloomsbury)

Will not be released until December, but has already been reviewed by the following:

Salon, 10/6/17

Bill Moyers and Company, 10/17/17

Ellsberg will receive additional attention in December, with the release of Steven Spielberg’s film,The Post, about the Washington Post‘s decision to publish The Pentagon Papers, which were leaked by Ellsberg,

David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, (PRH/Doubleday)

National Book Awards shortlist

LibraryReads selection, April

“In the 1920s, a string of unsolved murders rocked the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. Made rich by oil rights, the Osage were already victimized by unscrupulous businessmen and societal prejudice, but these murders were so egregious, the newly formed FBI was brought in to investigate. Immensely readable, this book brings a shameful part of U.S. history alive and will keep readers thinking long after they have finished the book.” — Jenna Persick, Chester County Library, Exton, PA

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave,” based on 23 reviews

Adaptations Update;
Weinstein Fallout

The fallout from the Harvey Weinstein scandal grows with each passing hour. His name is in the process of being removed from the film company he co-founded with his brother, The Weinstein Company. Hachette has closed down the Weinstein book imprint, he has been removed as a producer from several projects, including the adaptation of Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl and BBC1’s TV series Les Miserables. While both projects will move forward without him, other adaptations will not. Apple has shut down a TWC Elvis series based on the book by Dave Marsh. Channing Tatum announced that he has withdrawn the adaptation of Matthew Quick’s Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock, saying “we will no longer develop it or anything else that is property of TWC.”

Accusations against others are also surfacing. Shortly after Bob Weinstein castigated his brother as “depraved ” in an emotional interview with The Hollywood Reporter, he found himself facing similar accusations. Oliver Stone was also accused of harassment shortly after publicly stating he was “appalled” by the stories about Weinstein and commending the “courage of the women who’ve stepped forward to report sexual abuse or rape,”

More are likely to follow. As Deadline points out, Weinstein is part of a horrible tradition that reaches back to the early days of the business.

But not all news in Hollywood is Weinstein-related. Several projects are in the works, as listed in our most recent update, Movie and TV Book Adaptations — UPDATES,10:09 through 10:19:17. Among the highlights:

I Know This Much Is True — Mark Ruffalo will star in HBO’s adaptation of the Wally Lamb novel

The One and Only Ivan — Angelina Jolie will voice lead in an animated version of Katherine Applegate’s Newbery medalist

Never Caught — Film rights picked up for one of the finalists for this year’s National Book Awards

Outlander — Season 4 begins filming in Scotland, based on Drums Of Autumn, book 4 in Diana Gabaldon’s series

The Alienist  — TV series is set for release in January on TNT based on Caleb Carr’s novel

Nancy Drew –NBC puts series into redevelopment after NBC passed on it last year

Goldfinch — Ansel Elgort to play Theo in the movie based on Donna Tartt’s best seller

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, link to our Movies & TV Based on Books spreadsheet. Our list of tie-ins here.

George Saunders Wins Man Booker

George Saunders’ novel Lincoln in the Bardo (PRH/RH; RH Audio/BOT), a number one best seller in the US, has won the Man Booker Prize. Saunders is the second American to win the British prize, following Paul Beatty’s The Sellout (Macmillan/FSG) last year. Americans only became eligible for the Prize  four years ago.

Back in March, Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman bought the film rights to the book. It has also had a virtual reality adaptation.

Man Booker To Be Announced Today


The winner of the Man Booker Awards will be announced in London tonight, which will be mid- to late afternoon, Eastern time.

The Guardian sums up the odds for the six titles on the shortlist, “Man Booker prize 2017: Ali Smith leads sales, George Saunders ahead at bookies.

4 3 2 1,  Paul Auster, January 31, 2017, Macmillan/Henry Holt and Co.; Trade pbk, Picador, February 6, 2018

History of Wolves, Emily Fridlund, January 3, 2017, Atlantic Monthly Press; Trade pbk, Grove Press, November 7, 2017 — debut author

Exit West, Mohsin Hamid, Riverhead Books, March 7, 2017; Trade pbk, March 6, 2018

Elmet, Fiona Mozley, Workman/Algonquin, December 5, 2017, (ship date: November 8, 2017). A first novel, this one is considered a wild card.

Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders, February 14, 2017, Random House; Random House Trade Paperback, February 6, 2018

Autumn, Ali Smith, February 7, 2017, PRH/Pantheon; Trade pbk, PRH/Anchor, October 31, 2017

Adaptations Update:
New Trailers Abound

The trailer for the next movie in the Star Wars franchise, The Last Jedi, made its debut last night during the broadcast of the Bears vs. Vikings game. It’s not based on a book, but a multitude of tie-ins are being published. In keeping with recent tradition, to avoid spoilers, novelizations won’t be released until March, well after the movie’s December debut. Until then, publishers have to content themselves with publishing bridge Journey to Star Wars titles. Entertainment Weekly describes the titles in the publishing program. See the list of titles in our catalog of Upcoming — Tie-ins.

A flurry of other new trailers have been released since our last update:

Justice League

Maze Runner: The Death Cure

Jack Ryan

Castle Rock

Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams

Marvel’s Runaways

Happy!

1922 (Stephen King)

Constantine

Paddington 2

Shadowhunters, Season 3

Waco

In other news since our last update, what’s old is new again. Back in 2010, there was much excitement about an adaptation of Stacy Schiff’s Cleopatra, to be directed by James Cameron with Angela Jolie potentially in the lead. Both went on to other things, but the project may be getting new life, with Blade Runner 2049 director Denis Villeneuve in talks to take it on. No word on potential stars.

The many Tana French fans will be delighted that her Dublin Murders series is being adapted by BBC One as an eight-part series.

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, link to our Movies & TV Based on Books collection. To browse just the recent updates, download EarlyWord, Books-to-Movies UPDATES-—-Sept-22 thru Oct 9, 2017.