EarlyWord

News for Collection Development and Readers Advisory Librarians

Adaptations Update; Weinstein Fallout

The fallout from the Harvey Weinstein scandal grows with each passing hour. His name is in the process of being removed from the film company he co-founded with his brother, The Weinstein Company. Hachette has closed down the Weinstein book imprint, he has been removed as a producer from several projects, including the adaptation of Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl and BBC1’s TV series Les Miserables. While both projects will move forward without him, other adaptations will not. Apple has shut down a TWC Elvis series based on the book by Dave Marsh. Channing Tatum announced that he has withdrawn the adaptation of Matthew Quick’s Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock, saying “we will no longer develop it or anything else that is property of TWC.”

Accusations against others are also surfacing. Shortly after Bob Weinstein castigated his brother as “depraved ” in an emotional interview with The Hollywood Reporter, he found himself facing similar accusations. Oliver Stone was also accused of harassment shortly after publicly stating he was “appalled” by the stories about Weinstein and commending the “courage of the women who’ve stepped forward to report sexual abuse or rape,”

More are likely to follow. As Deadline points out, Weinstein is part of a horrible tradition that reaches back to the early days of the business.

But not all news in Hollywood is Weinstein-related. Several projects are in the works, as listed in our most recent update, Movie and TV Book Adaptations — UPDATES,10:09 through 10:19:17. Among the highlights:

I Know This Much Is True — Mark Ruffalo will star in HBO’s adaptation of the Wally Lamb novel

The One and Only Ivan — Angelina Jolie will voice lead in an animated version of Katherine Applegate’s Newbery medalist

Never Caught — Film rights picked up for one of the finalists for this year’s National Book Awards

Outlander — Season 4 begins filming in Scotland, based on Drums Of Autumn, book 4 in Diana Gabaldon’s series

The Alienist  — TV series is set for release in January on TNT based on Caleb Carr’s novel

Nancy Drew –NBC puts series into redevelopment after NBC passed on it last year

Goldfinch — Ansel Elgort to play Theo in the movie based on Donna Tartt’s best seller

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, link to our Movies & TV Based on Books spreadsheet. Our list of tie-ins here.

George Saunders Wins Man Booker

George Saunders’ novel Lincoln in the Bardo (PRH/RH; RH Audio/BOT), a number one best seller in the US, has won the Man Booker Prize. Saunders is the second American to win the British prize, following Paul Beatty’s The Sellout (Macmillan/FSG) last year. Americans only became eligible for the Prize  four years ago.

Back in March, Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman bought the film rights to the book. It has also had a virtual reality adaptation.

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues. Oct. 17

This edition of YA/MG GalleyChat is now over. Join us for the next one on Tuesday, Nov. 21, 4 to 5 pm. #ewgcya

Man Booker To Be Announced Today


The winner of the Man Booker Awards will be announced in London tonight, which will be mid- to late afternoon, Eastern time.

The Guardian sums up the odds for the six titles on the shortlist, “Man Booker prize 2017: Ali Smith leads sales, George Saunders ahead at bookies.

4 3 2 1,  Paul Auster, January 31, 2017, Macmillan/Henry Holt and Co.; Trade pbk, Picador, February 6, 2018

History of Wolves, Emily Fridlund, January 3, 2017, Atlantic Monthly Press; Trade pbk, Grove Press, November 7, 2017 — debut author

Exit West, Mohsin Hamid, Riverhead Books, March 7, 2017; Trade pbk, March 6, 2018

Elmet, Fiona Mozley, Workman/Algonquin, December 5, 2017, (ship date: November 8, 2017). A first novel, this one is considered a wild card.

Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders, February 14, 2017, Random House; Random House Trade Paperback, February 6, 2018

Autumn, Ali Smith, February 7, 2017, PRH/Pantheon; Trade pbk, PRH/Anchor, October 31, 2017

Adaptations Update:
New Trailers Abound

The trailer for the next movie in the Star Wars franchise, The Last Jedi, made its debut last night during the broadcast of the Bears vs. Vikings game. It’s not based on a book, but a multitude of tie-ins are being published. In keeping with recent tradition, to avoid spoilers, novelizations won’t be released until March, well after the movie’s December debut. Until then, publishers have to content themselves with publishing bridge Journey to Star Wars titles. Entertainment Weekly describes the titles in the publishing program. See the list of titles in our catalog of Upcoming — Tie-ins.

A flurry of other new trailers have been released since our last update:

Justice League

Maze Runner: The Death Cure

Jack Ryan

Castle Rock

Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams

Marvel’s Runaways

Happy!

1922 (Stephen King)

Constantine

Paddington 2

Shadowhunters, Season 3

Waco

In other news since our last update, what’s old is new again. Back in 2010, there was much excitement about an adaptation of Stacy Schiff’s Cleopatra, to be directed by James Cameron with Angela Jolie potentially in the lead. Both went on to other things, but the project may be getting new life, with Blade Runner 2049 director Denis Villeneuve in talks to take it on. No word on potential stars.

The many Tana French fans will be delighted that her Dublin Murders series is being adapted by BBC One as an eight-part series.

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, link to our Movies & TV Based on Books spreadsheet. To browse just the recent updates, download EarlyWord, Books-to-Movies UPDATES-—-Sept-22 thru Oct 9, 2017.

 

October GalleyChat:
Teetering TBR Piles

Librarians leaped into Winter/Spring titles during Tuesday’s GalleyChat. Below is a Storify version of the chat. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

For a list of all the titles, check our Edelweiss catalog, or download the spreadsheet, EarlyWord GalleyChat titles, 10:3:17.

Join us for our next chat, Tues., Nov 7,  4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Details here.

Nobel in Lit Goes to Ishiguro

Long considered a contender, Kazuo Ishiguro, the Japanese-British author of The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, has won this year’s Nobel Prize in Literature.

Adaptations Update; Sequel Mania

The two big winners from last week’s Emmy Awards, HBO’s Big Little Lies and Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale are both based on self-contained books, making the highly desired sequels problematic. Nevertheless, the producers are working with the authors to come up with new storylines. Liane Moriarity has only admitted to “thinking about” a followup to Lies, but Deadline reports on rumors that she has written a novella to serve as the basis for a sequel.

There’s no such coyness about Handmaids Tale. Production on season two has already begun and is expected to wrap in February. Author Margaret Atwood, who celebrated with the crew during the Emmy ceremony, is heavily involved with the new season.

Two film sequels will compete this weekend to knock the surprise hit, Stephen King’s It out of first place at the box office. Kingsman: The Golden Circle, the second in the film franchise based on Mark Millar and Dave Gibbons’ comics series The Secret Service, opens in 3,900 theaters, as does the family film, The LEGO Ninjago Movie. Several tie-ins to the latter are available from Scholastic and DK; see our tie-ins list here.

Opening in just NY and LA advance of a wider run is Judi Dench in round two as Queen Victoria, this time in Victoria & Abdul. Dench also appears briefly in the new trailer for Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, to open Nov. 11. The actress is not suffering from a lack of offers. It was also announced this week that she is considering a role in another adaptation to be directed by Branagh, of Eion Colfer’s Artemis Fowl, now with a release date of Aug. 9, 2019.

Not a sequel, but the English-language version of a Swedish hit, A Man Called Ove, based on the best-seller by Fredrik Backman, is in the works and Tom Hanks has signed to play the lead.

Several new trailers were released in the last week, including the first for a new adaptation of Beatrix Potter’s Peter Rabbit, indicating that the movie will have little in common with the original, other than the characters’ names.

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, download our Movies & TV Based on Book spreadsheet. To browse the recent updates, download EarlyWord-Books-to-Movies-UPDATES-—-Sept-15-thru-21-2017

We want to thank Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla for her encouraging shout-out to EarlyWord‘s adaptations coverage on the ALSC blog this week. Thanks to comments like hers, we intend to continue our regular updates.

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues. Sept. 19

Librarians chat about the YA and Middle Grade galleys they are rereading. See TweetChat below.

National Book Awards, The 2017 Fiction Longlist

The longlist of ten titles for the National Book Awards in fiction was announced today.

Of the ten, eight of the books are by women. The L.A. Times notes this is “the first time since the National Book Foundation started using longlists in 2013 that women have appeared in such a majority.”

This is the culmination of longlist announcements. The longlists for nonfiction, poetry and young people’s literature are available on the National Book Foundation’s site.

Adaptations Update; Streaming Services Causing Upheaval

 

One of two film adaptations opening today, Angelina Jolie’s First They Killed My Father debuts in just 13 cities, as well as on Netflix. It’s rare that a film appears in theaters as well as on demand. Theater owners generally stick to the 90-day window, refusing to book any movie set to appear on demand within that period, let alone on the same date. Landmark Theaters, however, has a deal with Netflix, which also applies to the upcoming adaptation of Kent Haruf’s Our Souls at Night, starring Robert Redford and Jane Fonda.

While many studio chiefs say they want to support theater owners with the 90-day rule, Fox CEO Lachlan Murdoch spoke out strongly against the practice this week, claiming it will change in the next year, but not specifying how.

The rise of streaming services is also causing pain to cable TV. A new report says that more people are quitting cable in favor of streaming.

But Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos seems to be suffering at least a bit of cable envy. This week, he ordered Amazon studios to bring him a show like HBO’s Game of Thrones. Presumably, he’s not impressed with award-winning series that draw relatively small audiences. Amazon Studio head, Roy Price, tells Variety, “We’ve been looking at the data for some time, and as a team, we’re increasingly focused on the impact of the biggest shows. It’s pretty evident that it takes big shows to move the needle.” Already canceled is the second season of Z, based on Therese Anne Fowler’s novel about Zelda Fitzgerald. It’s predicted that a planned series based on Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan will suffer a similar fate

The second adaptation opening today fits the traditional model, debuting in 3,100 theaters. American Assassin, based on Vince Flynn’s series, is expected to do well at the box office and launch a new franchise, but not to eclipse Stephen King’s It, which exceeded expectations and gave the movie business a much-needed piece of good news after a dismal summer.

Those are just a few of the nearly 50 projects we’ve recently updated on our spreadsheet of Upcoming Movies & TV Based on Books. To browse the updates, download EarlyWord, Books to Movies, UPDATES — Aug 22 thru Sept 14, 2017.

Man Booker Shortlist, 2017

The shortlist for one of the most influential literary awards in the English language, the 2017 Man Booker Prize, was announced in London today. Surprisingly, the novel that has won the most awards to date, including the Pulitzer Prize, Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, did not make it to the shortlist. Several other big names also did not make the cut, Arundhati Roy, Sebastian Barry, and Zadie Smith.The Guardian declares the list “daring,” featuring novels that “reject conventional realism and celebrate precarious and unstable narratives,”

Half of the six titles are by authors from the U.S., as the New York Times notes in its headline.

The winner will be announced on Oct. 17.

4 3 2 1,  Paul Auster, January 31, 2017, Macmillan/Henry Holt and Co.; Trade pbk, Picador, February 6, 2018 — U.S.

History of Wolves, Emily Fridlund, January 3, 2017, Atlantic Monthly Press; Trade pbk, Grove Press, November 7, 2017 — U.S, debut author

Exit West, Mohsin Hamid, Riverhead Books, March 7, 2017; Trade pbk, March 6, 2018 — UK/Pakistan

Elmet, Fiona Mozley, No US publisher announced yet. UK publisher is Hodder & Stoughton — UK. A first novel, this one is considered a wild card. UPDATE: it is now set to be published by Workman/Algonquin, December 5, 2017, )ship Date: November 8, 2017) and to be released in audio by HighBridge Audio.

Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders, February 14, 2017, Random House; Random House Trade Paperback, February 6, 2018 — U.S.

Autumn, Ali Smith, February 7, 2017, PRH/Pantheon; Trade pbk, PRH/Anchor, October 31, 2017 — Scotland

Meet A.J. Finn, the Author of
THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW

 

For several months, GalleyChatters have been talking about A.J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018), predicting it will be the hot debut of 2018.

Below, we chat with the author.

       

GalleyChatters Predict:
Fall/Winter Reading Trends

The trend for psychological thrillers has had amazing longevity. With so many new titles published in the genre, fans are becoming more and more demanding.

Two titles were mentioned most often during last week’s GalleyChat as the best of the upcoming crop:

 

The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018) — please join us for a chat with the author, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 4 to 5 pm. ET, Chat window will be posted at 3 pm on EarlyWord.com

Sometimes I Lie, Alice Feeney, (Macmillan/Flatiron, March 13, 2018) — this one is SO twisty, that it lost several readers. The title itself warns readers that this is they’re dealing with the ultimate in unreliable narrators.

Nods also went to:

   

The Last Mrs. Parrish, Liv Constantine, (Harper, October 17)

Poison, Galt Niederhoffer, (Macmillan/ St. Martin’s, November 21)

The Wife Between Us, Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, January 9, 2018)

If you’re not a fan of the genre, or just need a palate cleanser, there’s much to tempt you from the nearly 130 titles getting enthusiastic endorsements (see the Edelweiss catalog here).

For those hoping to sniff out the next trend, Marika Zemke of Commerce Twp. (MI) Public Library makes a strong case for medical narratives and survival stories, saying people crave them these days. With hurricanes and fires raging and a chaotic federal government, that seems to make sense. She offers  the following as examples:

     

The Encore: A Memoir in Three Acts, Charity Tillemann-Dick, (S&S/Atria, October 3) — an opera singer continues her career despite having BOTH lungs transplanted.

Counting Backwards: A Doctor’s Notes on Anesthesia, Henry Jay Przybylo, (Norton, November 14), — “takes you past the forbidden operating room doors into the O.R.”

In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Awdish, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, October 24)  — A doctor learns first hand the flaws in current medical practice when she nearly dies herself.

The Cookie Cure: A Mother/Daughter Memoir of Cookies and Cancer, Susan Stachler, Laura Stachler, (Sourcebooks, February 1, 2018)   — “an almost unbelievable story of medical coincidence.”

Some of you may remember an earlier time when medical narratives were all the rage. GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower says they’ve never gone out of style for her. She remembers, “Back in the late 70s I read Elder’s And I Alone Survived, which fueled my obsession with survival stories. My medical obsession started in the early 1970s with James Kerr’s soap opera-ish novel The Clinic and, of course, Hailey’s Diagnosis. About 30 years ago Echo Heron published Intensive Care, about her stint as a nurse, along with Carol Gino’s The Nurse’s Story. Like many library patrons, I couldn’t get enough of these kinds of stories.”

Below is a transcript. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

Adaptations Update

The adaptation of Donna Tartt’s 2013 best seller The Goldfinch (Hachette/Little,Brown) may finally be moving ahead. Variety reports that Warner Bros. is working on a deal with Amazon Studios to co-finance the project.

That’s just one of the over 40 projects we’ve updated on our spreadsheet of Upcoming Movies & TV Based on Books in the last two weeks. To browse the latest information, download EarlyWord, Books to Movies, UPDATES — Aug 7 thru Aug 22

Other highlights:

Production has begun in Atlanta on a movie based on the YA novel Dumplin’  by Julie Murphy. In the title role is Australian actress Danielle Macdonald, who is currently getting kudos as the star of Patti Cake$. Jennifer Aniston will join her in the musical comedy, playing her mother.

A director has been hired for a TV series based on Amor Towles’s A Gentleman From Moscow, which is still on the NYT best seller list, at #8 after 28 weeks.

Stars have been announced for a TV series based on Deborah Harkness’s A Discovery of Witches.

Octavia Butler’s Dawn, Book One in her Lilith’s Brood trilogy,(1987) is being developed as a TV series.

Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House is moving forward as a Netflix series.

Trailers have been released for:

Our Souls at Night, based on Ken Haruf’s 2015 novel.

Molly’s Game based on the memoir, Molly’s Game: From Hollywood’s Elite to Wall Street’s Billionaire Boys Club, My High-Stakes Adventure in the World of Underground Poker, by Molly Bloom, (HarperCollins/It Books, 2014)