EarlyWord

News for Collection Development and Readers Advisory Librarians

Burning Up

The week’s best seller numbers confirm just how well Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury is doing. Last week, it hit #1, quite a feat, considering it was released on a Friday, and thus lists reflected just two days of sales.

Again at #1 this week, BookScan figures, as reported by PW, show that it’s sold 220,000 copies through Jan 14. Compare that to the #1 fiction title, The Woman in the Window. BookScan reports it has sold over 36,000 copies, a respectable number, especially for a debut.

BookScan figures do not reflect the entire market, notably sales to libraries (see an analysis here, by the Independent Book Publishers Association), currently awaiting large orders to offset heavy holds queues.

Meanwhile, you may want to steer customers to the audio version, which has fewer holds. The Washington Post gives it a pointed recommendation, “Can’t find a print copy of ‘Fire and Fury?’ The audiobook delivers 12 hours of high-octane gossip.”

For your large print readers, Thorndike recently made this announcement:

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House
Michael Wolff, Thorndike
ISBN-10: 1432852043
ISBN-13: 9781432852047
Hardcover, $33.99

YA/MG GalleyChat, Wed. Jan. 17

Tell us what you’re reading, 3 to 4 pm. ET (2:30 for virtual cocktails). #ewgcya

Bring a friend!

Follow along below, and add your comments in the window at the bottom (it will enter #ewgc for you automatically). Refresh the page to see new tweets.

GalleyChat, Tues. Jan. 9

Join us today to learn which galleys fellow librarians are loving – 4 to 5 p.m. EDT (3:30 for virtual cocktails)

Follow along below, and add your comments in the window at the bottom (it will enter #ewgc for you automatically). Refresh the page to see new tweets.

Lisa Von Drasek Picks Best Kids Books 2017

Self-confessed childrens books “big mouth,” Lisa Von Drasek, Curator of the Children’s Literature Research Collections.at the U. of Minn., and former EW Kids Correspondent, appeared recently on Minnesota Public Radio to discuss the best kids books of 2017. She is joined by St. Paul indie bookseller, Holly Weinkauf from the Red Balloon Bookshop. It’s worth a listen just for the infectious joy in their voices, not to mention the books they’ll make you want to pick up immediately. Lisa notes that they “discussed fifty-five books in less than an hour and didn’t even get to every one that we brought with us.” For the complete list go to No Kidding: The Best Kids’ Books to Give This Holiday Season.

They highlight cookbooks, giving special praise to Pizza, from Phaidon’s Cook in Book series, interactive titles that allow kids to virtually create recipes from scratch.

Lisa is blogging at the Blue Ox Review, the site she recently founded to “review books, give a heads up on upcoming titles that I am excited about, link to interesting news and events, and show off cool stuff from my collection. Of course, there will be an occasional rant.”

On the site, she is doing her annual “Books to give kids you don’t know very well,” (archive here) to help booksellers and librarians navigate the “maddening game” of recommending the exactly perfect gift for kids customers may see only once a year:

Best Books 2017: Read Alouds

Lets Get Started- For twos, threes, and fours

 

Lainey Mays Joins HarperCollins Library Marketing Team

During the HarperCollins Library LoveFest FaceBook Live presentation last week, Virginia Stanley and Chris Connelly welcomed Lainey Mays, the team’s new Library Marketing Assistant.

Lainey proves she will fit in well, managing to talk passionately about favorite titles while wearing odd headgear in what appears to be a tiki hut.

She replaces Amanda Rountree, now working in Macmillan’s Special Markets department.

Some of you may be experiencing name déjà vu, remembering another former HC Library Marketing member, Annie Mazes, who is now head of Library Marketing at Workman.

Meet Lainey below, as the entire team talks about favorite recently published and upcoming titles:

If you are going to ALA MidWinter in February, you can meet her in the booth in person, or during the HC Buzz session.

Updated contact information for the team below (also updated on our Publisher Contacts directory, link at right).

HarperCollins Publishers
195 Broadway
New York, NY 10007

Librarians Page: Library Love Fest blog

Book Club Suggestions: Harper Library Book Club

Community Wide Reads: HarperReads

Library Newsletter: Library News

Virginia Stanley
Director of Library Marketing
Tel: 212-207-7592
Virginia.Stanley@harpercollins.com

Lainey Mays
Library Marketing Assistant
(212) 207-6938
lainey.mays@harpercollins.com

Chris Connolly
Library Marketing Associate
(212) 207-7238
christopher.connolly@harpercollins.com

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues. Dec. 19

Join us for the next YA/MG GalleyChat on Wed., Jan. 17, 3 to 4 pm, ET (2:30 for virtual cocktails). #ewgcya

List of titles discussed here (use it to discover e-galleys to download).

Below is a Storify version of the chat. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

#libfaves17 Is a Wrap!

Librarians have been celebrating the end of a remarkable publishing year with their own year-end roundup of favorites, tweeting a title a day using the hashtag #libfaves17.

An astounding 750 titles were tweeted, with a total vote count of 1,625, 14.1% higher than #libfaves16. Link the full list here.

Thanks to GalleyChatters Robin Beerbower, Stephanie Chase and Linda Johns who began this project six years ago.

Thanks also to the those who helped with the vote counting,
P.J. Gardiner, Marlise Schiltz, Jane Jorgenson, Joe Jones. Vicki Nesting, Lucy Lockley, Jenna Friebel, Gregg Winsor, Susan Balla and Andrienne Cruz.

And thanks to all the librarians who joined in.

Special thanks to Janet Lockhart for her late night work in compiling the final list. We can now announce the top ten vote-getters, but before we do, we’d like to encourage you to take a look at the Storify transcripts of each day’s tweets. As many have attested over the years, the true fun of libfaves is the sheer range of titles and reading how librarians write about them.

 

You are sure to discover titles you may have missed. Even Robin Beerbower, who seems to have read everything, discovered one of her favorites through the process:

 

 

One of the joys of the list is that it is not limited by age designation or format, so it offers opportunities to discover picture books, graphic novels, and YA titles. In fact, the number one title is the National Book Award longlist title for Young People Literature, The Hate U Give, which received nearly twice as many votes as the number two title, Celeste Ng’s novel for adults, Little Fires Everywhere. Close behind at #3 is Gail Honeyman’s Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine.

    

1 —  The Hate U Give, Thomas, Angie, (HarperCollins/ Balzer + Bray) —  49 votes

2 — Little Fires Everywhere, Ng, Celeste, (PRH/ Penguin Press) —  28 votes — also the  #1 LibraryReads Favorite of Favorites

3 — Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine, Honeyman, Gail, (PRH/ Pamela Dorman Books) —  26 votes — also a LibraryReads Favorite of Favorites

The other titles in the top ten are:

   

   

  

4 — The Dry, Harper, Jane (Macmillan/Flatiron) — 21 — also a LibraryReads Favorite of Favorites

5 — Magpie Murders , Horowitz, Anthony, (HarperCollins/Harper)  — 19 — also a LibraryReads Favorite of Favorites

6 — Sing, Unburied, Sing, Ward, Jesmyn (S&S/Scribner) — 18

7, 8 & 9 (tied) —

You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me, Alexie, Sherman, (Hachette/Little, Brown) — 16

American War, El Akkad, Omar, (PRH/Knopf) — 16

Hunger: A Memoir Of (My) Body, Gay, Roxane, (HarperCollins/Harper) — 16

10 —  (tie)

City Of Brass, Chakraborty, S.A., (HarperCollins/Harper Voyager) — 14

Turtles All The Way Down, Green, John (Penguin Young Readers/Dutton) — 14

This year, for the first time, the fun continues:

James Franco Explores
THE DISASTER ARTIST

The “Citizen Kane of bad movies” is the inspiration for James Franco’s latest film The Disaster Artist, opening in theaters tomorrow.

Titled The Room (not to be confused with Room, starring Brie Larson), it made only $1,800 in its opening week, but went on to become a cult hit.

Franco’s movie takes its name from a book by one of the actors in the film, Greg Sestero, The Disaster Artist, written with journalist Tom Bissell. It has been released as a movie tie-in.

Franco tells Terry Gross on Fresh Air that his movie could not have been made without the background provided by the book.

Libraries are showing holds on the book, but many more on the film itself. A Blu-Ray version was released in 2013

This faux trailer gives a sense of the movie:

 

GalleyChat, Tues. Dec. 5

The December GalleyChat is a wrap. The full list of 127 titles discussed is here.

Join us for the next GalleyChat on Jan. 9, 4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails, to learn about the galleys fellow librarians are loving.

Libfaves Returns!

Dozens of best books lists have appeared (see our links at right), including LibraryReads Favorites of Favorites, just released today.

But you can still get your own favorites recognized, via #libfaves17. The rules are simple — tweet your ten favorite titles of the year, one per day, beginning on Monday. We’ll round up all the titles after tweeting wraps on Dec. 14.

Adaptations Update:
What Is a Movie?

Hollywood is grappling with many upheavals, including a fundamental question, what makes a movie a movie. As streaming services grow and develop their own original films, should a “movie” still be defined as having been made for theaters? The Motion Picture Academy has assigned a committee to study whether to change their requirement that a movie opens in at least a limited number of theaters to qualify for Oscar nominations. Meanwhile, Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos, who announced plans to release 80 movies next year, is campaigning hard to be released from that charade.

Meanwhile, Netflix may win its first feature film Oscar for the adaptation of Hilary Jordan’s Mudbound, which opened, in a limited number of theaters, of course, last week.

It’s been a depressing year at the box office, so Hollywood is particularly hopeful that families will hit the multiplexes this Thanksgiving weekend. The animated Disney feature Coco is expected to be a hit, and may even knock the superhero adaptation Justice League out of first place. The Day of the Dead themed movie is not an adaptation, but there are tie-ins (see our list). The look of the movie draws on the work of Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada, who is featured in the Sibert-winning book, Funny Bones — Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras, (Abrams, 2015).

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, link to our Movies & TV Based on Books collection. To browse the most recent updates, download EarlyWord Adaptations-UPDATES 10/19 thru 11/20/17. Among the highlights:

Death on the Nile — following the success of Murder on the Orient Express, Kenneth Branagh is planning to direct a new adaptation of Agatha Christie’s classic and again star as Hercule Poirot

Adaptations of several other classics have also been announced:

Catch 22 — Joseph Heller’s satire has been optioned for a TV series, directed by and starring George Clooney

If Beale Street Could Talk  — Filming has begun on this adaptation of James Baldwin’s 1974 novel

Lord Of The Rings — Optioned for an Amazon series

Invisible Man — Hulu is in the early stages of development of a series based on Ralph Ellison’s ground-breaking 1952 novel

The Painted Bird — Jerzy Kosinski’s 1965 anti-war novel has been optioned for a film

White Fang — Jack London’s 1908 classic is in development as an animated feature

Welcome, BookPulse

For those who are  missing EarlyWord‘s daily book news coverage, there’s a new resource in town, Library Journal‘s “Book Pulse” column by Neal Wyatt, with the goal to “help collection development and readers’ advisory librarians navigate the never-ending wave of new books and book news.”

And that it does. Dozens of links each day offer a quick but thoughtful round up of the book coverage that will generate holds lists and give librarians new titles to recommend. Wyatt’s passion for readers advisory work and collection development shine through each day.

If you like what you see, be sure to let LJ know in the comments section and sign up to get “Book Pulse” alerts via email.

National Book Awards
Stream Live TONIGHT

UPDATE: NPR’s report on the National Book Awards is here.

Watch the National Book Awards, hosted by Cynthia Nixon, live tonight on the National Book Foundation’s site.

The event is scheduled to begin at 7:20 ET, when Bill Clinton presents the Literarian Award to Dick Robinson, CEO of Scholastic, followed by Anne Hathaway presenting Annie Proulx with the Foundation’s lifetime achievement award. After a break for dinner, the book awards get rolling around 9:20 pm.

To play along, download the ballot here.

GalleyChat Looks to
Spring/Summer Hits

 

A glimpse of Spring/Summer 2018 season appeared among the titles mentioned during the November GalleyChat. Several titles carry over from previous chats, particularly A.J. Finn’s domestic thriller, The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, January 2, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 11/20/17), It leads the list in terms of “Much Love” designations on Edelweiss, with 132. (Note: read our chat with the author below).

Attesting to the enduring appeal of the genre, another domestic thriller, Peter Swanson’s April title, All the Beautiful Lies, (HarperCollins/Morrow, April 3, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 2/20/17) already has 76 “Much Love” comments.

Among the titles receiving particular GalleyChat passion is Tara Westover’s debut memoir, Educated, (PRH/Random House, February 20, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 12/20/17). By a woman who grew up in an abusive home, it is described as the “2018 version of Glass Castle.”

Below is a Storify version of the chat. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

For a list of all the titles, check our Edelweiss catalog,

Join us for our next chat, Tues., Dec. 5,  4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Details here.

Carnegie Finalists Announced

The finalists for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction were announced today, three titles each, down from longlists of 25 in fiction and 21 in nonfiction.

The winners will be announced at ALA Midwinter in Denver

Fiction

   

Jennifer Egan, Manhattan Beach, (S&S/Scribner)

LibraryReads selection, October

“Anna and her father Eddie arrive at the home of Dexter Styles on Manhattan Beach searching for a job during the Depression. After Eddie goes missing five years later, Anna supports her mother and sister by working at the Brooklyn Naval Yard. One night, Anna approaches Styles for information about her father. They become involved, but he is still marked by his past relationship with Eddie. Egan’s description of New York in the 30s and 40s is so immersive that you feel like you’re waking up when you have to put the book down.” — Barbara Birenbaum, Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, CA

Reviews, Book Marks, “Positive,” based on 31 reviews

George Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo, (PRH/Random House)

Winner of the Man Booker Prize

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave” based on 42 reviews

Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing, (S&S/Scribner)

National Book Awards, Shortlist

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave,” based on 27 reviews

 

Nonfiction

   

Sherman Alexie, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir, (Hachette/Little, Brown)

Reviews, Book Marks, “Positive,” based on 12 reviews

Daniel Ellsberg, The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner, (Macmillan/Bloomsbury)

Will not be released until December, but has already been reviewed by the following:

Salon, 10/6/17

Bill Moyers and Company, 10/17/17

Ellsberg will receive additional attention in December, with the release of Steven Spielberg’s film,The Post, about the Washington Post‘s decision to publish The Pentagon Papers, which were leaked by Ellsberg,

David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, (PRH/Doubleday)

National Book Awards shortlist

LibraryReads selection, April

“In the 1920s, a string of unsolved murders rocked the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. Made rich by oil rights, the Osage were already victimized by unscrupulous businessmen and societal prejudice, but these murders were so egregious, the newly formed FBI was brought in to investigate. Immensely readable, this book brings a shameful part of U.S. history alive and will keep readers thinking long after they have finished the book.” — Jenna Persick, Chester County Library, Exton, PA

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave,” based on 23 reviews