Archive for the ‘Childrens and YA’ Category

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues. Oct. 17

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

This edition of YA/MG GalleyChat is now over. Join us for the next one on Tuesday, Nov. 21, 4 to 5 pm. #ewgcya

Adaptations Update; Sequel Mania

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

The two big winners from last week’s Emmy Awards, HBO’s Big Little Lies and Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale are both based on self-contained books, making the highly desired sequels problematic. Nevertheless, the producers are working with the authors to come up with new storylines. Liane Moriarity has only admitted to “thinking about” a followup to Lies, but Deadline reports on rumors that she has written a novella to serve as the basis for a sequel.

There’s no such coyness about Handmaids Tale. Production on season two has already begun and is expected to wrap in February. Author Margaret Atwood, who celebrated with the crew during the Emmy ceremony, is heavily involved with the new season.

Two film sequels will compete this weekend to knock the surprise hit, Stephen King’s It out of first place at the box office. Kingsman: The Golden Circle, the second in the film franchise based on Mark Millar and Dave Gibbons’ comics series The Secret Service, opens in 3,900 theaters, as does the family film, The LEGO Ninjago Movie. Several tie-ins to the latter are available from Scholastic and DK; see our tie-ins list here.

Opening in just NY and LA advance of a wider run is Judi Dench in round two as Queen Victoria, this time in Victoria & Abdul. Dench also appears briefly in the new trailer for Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, to open Nov. 11. The actress is not suffering from a lack of offers. It was also announced this week that she is considering a role in another adaptation to be directed by Branagh, of Eion Colfer’s Artemis Fowl, now with a release date of Aug. 9, 2019.

Not a sequel, but the English-language version of a Swedish hit, A Man Called Ove, based on the best-seller by Fredrik Backman, is in the works and Tom Hanks has signed to play the lead.

Several new trailers were released in the last week, including the first for a new adaptation of Beatrix Potter’s Peter Rabbit, indicating that the movie will have little in common with the original, other than the characters’ names.

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, download our Movies & TV Based on Book spreadsheet. To browse the recent updates, download EarlyWord-Books-to-Movies-UPDATES-—-Sept-15-thru-21-2017

We want to thank Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla for her encouraging shout-out to EarlyWord‘s adaptations coverage on the ALSC blog this week. Thanks to comments like hers, we intend to continue our regular updates.

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues. Sept. 19

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

Librarians chat about the YA and Middle Grade galleys they are rereading. See TweetChat below.

The Breakfast Club Meets Murder Mystery

Sunday, July 2nd, 2017

Making its debut at No.5 on the NYT Young Adult Hardcover list this week is One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus (PRH/Delacorte Press; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample),

Calling it “The Breakfast Club meets murder mystery,” Entertainment Weekly gives it a B+ and says “McManus knows how to plot out a mystery, but the real charm of the novel lies in the journey each of the characters goes on … [a] pretty stellar summer read.”

Kirkus says the “fast-paced blend of Gossip Girl, Pretty Little Liars, and classic John Hughes will leave readers racing to the finish as they try to unravel the mystery on their own.”

It has made a number of lists.

Seventeen names it “20 of the Best YA Books of 2017.”

Entertainment Weekly puts it on three of their lists:

Bustle lists it three times as well:

Holds at most libraries we checked are topping 3:1.

PADDINGTON BEAR Creator Dies

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

His bear traveled from “darkest Peru” to London, from the 1958 chapter book A Bear Called Paddington to a series of 13 more novels, multiple picture books and the big screen. Creator Michael Bond died at 91 on Tuesday.

In a 2007 interview in the Telegraph, Bond sai the little bear helped him deal with dark times.

The most recent in the chapter book series, Paddington’s Finest Hour (HarperCollins) will be published in the US on September 13th.

The second Paddington movie is expected arrive in theaters later this year.

Green’s TURTLES

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

As promised, John Green devoted yesterday’s vlogbrothers video to his forthcoming book, Turtles All the Way Down (PRH/Dutton YR; Oct 10; cover art to come), his first novel since 2012’s The Fault in Our Stars.

He doesn’t reveal anything about the book’s content, talking instead about the special ISBN for signed copies, causing pre-orders for that edition to spike. Along the way, he explains what ISBN’s are, knowledge he gained while working at Booklist.

John Green, New Novel

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Turtles All the Way Down is the title of John Green’s next YA novel, (PRH/Dutton Books for Young Readers; 9780525555360; cover not finalized) releasing on October 10. It is his first novel in six years, following 2012’s The Fault in Our Stars.

Entertainment Weekly reports it is “the story of 16-year-old Aza Holmes, a young woman who grapples with mental illness while investigating the disappearance of a fugitive billionaire.”

Green says “This is my first attempt to write directly about the kind of mental illness that has affected my life since childhood, so while the story is fictional, it is also quite personal.”

He announced the book on Twitter in a very brief notice.

The title refers to a story which Stephen Hawking relates in A Brief History of Time. Faced with the theory that the world is flat, held on the back of a turtle, a famous astronomer asks what the turtle stands on. The answer reveals the illogic of the theory, “But it’s turtles all the way down!”

It’s just one of many metaphors readers can expect, according to the Penguin’s UK site, quoting Green, “The great thing about figurative language and symbols and the like in novels is that you don’t have to be conscious of them for them to work.”

UPDATE: Green talks about the book in a bonus Vlogbrothers video, below. He invites viewers to post questions about it and promises to try to answer them on his next video, scheduled for Tuesday, June 27.

Dog Finds Man

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

A stray dog nabs herself a multi book and movie deal.

A tiny but hardy pup, approached ultra-marathoner Dion Leonard during a long distance race in China across part of the Gobi Desert. She stayed with him, running nearly 80 miles. Leonard named her after the desert.

Her story, and his, gets even more dramatic. Once the run was over Gobi disappeared in a Chinese city while Leonard was raising funds to adopt her and take her back to his home in Scotland. An international effort launched on the Internet helped find her, hurt but ultimately OK.

He says that he has no idea why she came to him in the wilderness, “whether it was my smell — we don’t shower during the week in these races — or whether it was something else, whether it was a past life connection. It was definitely fate and I’m so glad that she chose me … she’s brought lots of joy to people around the globe with our story.”

That story is captured in Finding Gobi: A Little Dog with a Very Big Heart by Dion Leonard with Craig Borlase (HC/Thomas Nelson, June 13; Thomas Nelson Audio; OverDrive Sample).

Coming August 9 are YA and children’s versions:

 

 

 

 

 

Finding Gobi: Young Reader’s Edition: The True Story of One Little Dog’s Big Journey by Dion Leonard, adapted by Aaron Rosenberg (HC/Thomas Nelson).

Gobi: A Little Dog with a Big Heart by Dion Leonard, illustrated by Lisa Manuzak (HC/Thomas Nelson).

A board book comes out in early 2018, Gobi for Little Ones: The Race for Home by Dion Leonard, illustrated by Lisa Manuzak (HC/Thomas Nelson).

Twentieth Century Fox is developing the movie. Variety reports the studio “has preemptively acquired the film rights to the book.”

A portion of the proceeds from Leonard’s book will go to help other dogs in China.

To Movies: DAY THE CRAYONS QUIT

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

After 207 weeks on the NYT Picture Book Best Seller list and counting, Sony announces that they will adapt the 40-page picture book, The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt, illus. by Oliver Jeffers (Penguin Young Readers/ Philomel) into a feature filmDeadline reports that it is “envisioned as a live-action/animation hybrid.”

Described by Deadline as being about “a box of crayons whose inhabitants go on strike against their young owner after growing sick of how they’re being used, as their individual colors dictate very limited day-to-day existences for each crayon,” it’s not mentioned how fraught assumptions about color can be, as Betsy Bird explored in a post on her SLJ blog, Fuse Eight.

Dahl’s Dishes

Monday, June 19th, 2017

Everlasting gobstoppers, Fizzy Lifting Drink, Sugar flower teacups, each is a part of Willy Wonka’s amazing chocolate factory.

As NPR’s The Salt points out, these sweet concoctions are just a fraction of Roald Dahl’s culinary imagination. He also thought of giant chocolate cakes baked with blood and sweat (from Matilda) and doughnuts stuffed with goose-liver paste (Fantastic Mr. Fox).

Lucy Dahl joins the show to talk about how her dad filled her childhood with fantasies about food, claiming that the Queen sent the Dahls red cabbage from her very own garden or that the quail eggs they ate at breakfast really belonged to the Minpins who lived in the woods behind their house.

Dahl’s interest in food was not just literary. He saw treats as a way to instill magic in his children’s lives, waking them up at night to share chocolate and creating midnight feats they would consume after they walked in the woods in their pajamas looking for badgers, fortified by hot chocolate and cookies consumed on the way.

After Dahl died his family published a cookbook in 1997 as an homage to his focus on food, Roald Dahl’s Revolting Recipes (PRH/Puffin). Some of the dishes include Snozzcumbers and Crispy Wasp Stings on a Piece of Buttered Toast.

The Salt also takes some of Dahl’s iconic foods into the kitchen and with the help of Andrew Rea, the host of the YouTube show Binging With Babish, creates the giant cake from Matilda (warning, don’t watch if you are eating – or about to eat).

To Screen: THE WISHING SPELL

Sunday, June 18th, 2017

Chris Colfer, who has gone from actor on Glee to author of The Land of Stories series to screenwriter and director, will adapt his children’s novel The Land of Stories: The Wishing Spell (Hachette/ Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; Hachette Audio; Blackstone Audio; OverDrive Sample) for the silver screen.

The Hollywood Reporter calls it a “striking move” for the 27-year-old.

The Wishing Spell sees twins transported to a world in which fairy tale characters are real. The publisher describes the fractured fairy tale as a world where “Goldilocks is now a wanted fugitive, Red Riding Hood has her own kingdom, and Queen Cinderella is about to become a mother!”

The Wishing Spell is the first book in what has become a multimillion dollar franchise. The larger universe includes novels, picture books, chapter books, and a forthcoming graphic novel.

The final novel in the series will be published on July 11, Worlds Collide (Hachette/ Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; Blackstone Audio).

Twentieth Century Fox and the 21 Laps studio will jointly create the film. The later is responsible for Arrival, Stranger Things, and the upcoming adaptation of Alexandra Bracken’s The Darkest Minds series.

To Screen: Winnie-the-Pooh
Times Two

Friday, June 16th, 2017

In an odd bit of timing two films related to the beloved books and poems of A. A. Milne are headed to the movies.

The first is Goodbye Christopher Robin starring Domhnall Gleeson as A. A. Milne, Margot Robbie as his wife Daphne, as well as several actors who play Christopher at different ages.

The story focuses on Milne’s relationship with his son, the success of his books, and the effect the entire process had on Christopher himself. Variety describes it as “a bittersweet story of the little boy who inspired the Winnie-the-Pooh stories.”

It premieres October 13, 2017. The trailer is currently the #1 trending video on YouTube.

Disney is also making a film on the same subject, titled Christopher Robin. Ewan McGregor is set to star according to The Hollywood Reporter.

THR says the film will follow Christopher Robin as a grown up who has “lost his sense of imagination and is a businessman focused on work and success.”  Variety adds “Pooh and his friends reenter Robin’s life to help him gain that back.”

A premiere date has yet to be announced.

EVERY DAY, To the Movies

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

A feature film adaptation of David Levithan’s YA novel, Every Day (PRH/ Knopf Books for Young Readers; Listening Library), about a 16-year-boy who wakes up each morning in a new body, but still in love with the same girl, is set to begin production at the end of the month, reports Deadline, for release in 2018.

Australian actress Angourie Rice will star as the girl, Rhiannon. No other cast members have been announced. Michael Sucsy (HBO’s Grey Gardens 2009) will direct.

FERDINAND Gets a New Trailer

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017

The second  trailer for the Blue Sky adaptation of Munro Leaf ‘s 1936 classic The Story of Ferdinand has been released. The film opens on December 15.

WWE star and actor John Cena is the voice of Ferdinand. Also featured are SNL‘s Kate McKinnon, as well as Gina Rodriguez (Jane the Virgin), Daveed Diggs (Hamilton) and Bobby Cannavale.

9780670674244The book is still in print in hardcover and paperback (Penguin Young Readers/Puffin) and is being released as a board book in August.

 

Horn Book Award Winners

Monday, June 12th, 2017

The winners of the 2017 Horn Book – Boston Globe Awards were announced on May 31 during SLJ‘s Day of Dialog. The awards will be presented aceremony on Friday, October 6, 2017, at Boston’s Simmons College. A winner and two honor books are selected in each of three categories: Fiction and Poetry, Picture Book, and Nonfiction.

The Fiction and Poetry winner has become a key talking point and cultural phenomenon as well as a best seller. This is the first of many awards it is likely to win (titles published in the first half of 2017 are eligible for the Horn Book – Boston Globe Awards). It has already been selected as one of the best books of the year so far by the Washington Post and Entertainment Weekly. It is also set for a film adaptation starring Amandla Stenberg.

FICTION AND POETRY AWARD WINNER

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (HC/Balzer + Bray; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample).

Horn Book writes:

“Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter lives a life many African American teenagers can relate to: a life of double consciousness. Caught between her rough, predominantly black neighborhood and the “proper,” predominantly white prep school she attends, Starr has learned how to “speak with two different voices and only say certain things around certain people.” This precarious balance is broken when Starr witnesses the shooting of her (unarmed) childhood friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. What follows is a gut-wrenching chain of events that alters all Starr holds dear … Thomas has penned a powerful, in-your-face novel.”

Honor winners are One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance written by Nikki Grimes, illustrated by various artists (Macmillan/Bloomsbury Publishing; OverDrive Sample) and The Best Man by Richard Peck (PRH/Dial Books for Young Readers; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample).

PICTURE BOOK AWARD WINNER

Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan (S&S/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books/Atheneum Books for Young Readers; OverDrive Sample).

Horn Book says:

“A historical document dated July 5, 1828, lists the property to be sold from the Fairchilds’ estate. Hogs. Cattle. A handmill. Men. Women. Children. While no information beyond the gender and name — and price — of each of the eleven enslaved people is noted in the appraisal of the estate, Bryan lovingly restores their humanity and dignity, giving them ages, true African names, relationships, talents, hopes, and dreams … Bryan’s art is just as intentional. Facsimiles of the historical document serve as background for each slave’s introduction page, portraits of their faces taking precedence as they gaze out at the reader.”

Earlier, it was named a Newbery Honor Book , a Coretta Scott King (Author) Honor Book and a Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Honor Book.

Honor winners are Wolf in the Snow by Matthew Cordell (Macmillan/Feiwel & Friends; OverDrive Sample) and Town Is by the Sea by Joanne Schwartz, illustrated by Sydney Smith (Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press).

NONFICTION AWARD WINNER

Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers by Deborah Heiligman (Macmillan/Henry Holt; Dreamscape Audio; OverDrive Sample).

The Horn Book review says:

“After vividly setting the stage with brief sections that introduce Vincent and Theo near the end of their lives, Heiligman takes readers back to their beginnings. We learn of other siblings and of supportive parents; we gain a sense of their childhoods in their father’s parsonage. Structured as a walk through an art museum, the book proceeds through the years, each section a gallery … Heiligman mostly employs a present-tense, purposely staccato narration that effectively heightens the brothers’ emotional intensity, their sufferings and pleasures (physical, emotional, intellectual, aesthetic, and spiritual), and, most of all, Vincent’s wild and original art. The layout, which incorporates sketches, subheads, and a generous use of white space, is a calming counterpoint to the turbulent narrative … The result is a unique and riveting exploration of art, artists, and brotherly love.”

It was a National Book Award finalist.

Honor winners are Undefeated: Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School Football Team by Steve Sheinkin (Macmillan/Roaring Brook Press; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample) and Some Writer!: The Story of E. B. White by Melissa Sweet (HMH Books for Young Readers; OverDrive Sample).

The presentation video is online.

The judging panel included Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library (chair), Pauletta B. Bracy, North Carolina Central University, Durham, North Carolina; and Sheila M. Geraty, Brookwood School, Manchester, Massachusetts.