Archive for the ‘Childrens and YA’ Category

Dahl’s Dishes

Monday, June 19th, 2017

Everlasting gobstoppers, Fizzy Lifting Drink, Sugar flower teacups, each is a part of Willy Wonka’s amazing chocolate factory.

As NPR’s The Salt points out, these sweet concoctions are just a fraction of Roald Dahl’s culinary imagination. He also thought of giant chocolate cakes baked with blood and sweat (from Matilda) and doughnuts stuffed with goose-liver paste (Fantastic Mr. Fox).

Lucy Dahl joins the show to talk about how her dad filled her childhood with fantasies about food, claiming that the Queen sent the Dahls red cabbage from her very own garden or that the quail eggs they ate at breakfast really belonged to the Minpins who lived in the woods behind their house.

Dahl’s interest in food was not just literary. He saw treats as a way to instill magic in his children’s lives, waking them up at night to share chocolate and creating midnight feats they would consume after they walked in the woods in their pajamas looking for badgers, fortified by hot chocolate and cookies consumed on the way.

After Dahl died his family published a cookbook in 1997 as an homage to his focus on food, Roald Dahl’s Revolting Recipes (PRH/Puffin). Some of the dishes include Snozzcumbers and Crispy Wasp Stings on a Piece of Buttered Toast.

The Salt also takes some of Dahl’s iconic foods into the kitchen and with the help of Andrew Rea, the host of the YouTube show Binging With Babish, creates the giant cake from Matilda (warning, don’t watch if you are eating – or about to eat).

To Screen: THE WISHING SPELL

Sunday, June 18th, 2017

Chris Colfer, who has gone from actor on Glee to author of The Land of Stories series to screenwriter and director, will adapt his children’s novel The Land of Stories: The Wishing Spell (Hachette/ Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; Hachette Audio; Blackstone Audio; OverDrive Sample) for the silver screen.

The Hollywood Reporter calls it a “striking move” for the 27-year-old.

The Wishing Spell sees twins transported to a world in which fairy tale characters are real. The publisher describes the fractured fairy tale as a world where “Goldilocks is now a wanted fugitive, Red Riding Hood has her own kingdom, and Queen Cinderella is about to become a mother!”

The Wishing Spell is the first book in what has become a multimillion dollar franchise. The larger universe includes novels, picture books, chapter books, and a forthcoming graphic novel.

The final novel in the series will be published on July 11, Worlds Collide (Hachette/ Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; Blackstone Audio).

Twentieth Century Fox and the 21 Laps studio will jointly create the film. The later is responsible for Arrival, Stranger Things, and the upcoming adaptation of Alexandra Bracken’s The Darkest Minds series.

To Screen: Winnie-the-Pooh
Times Two

Friday, June 16th, 2017

In an odd bit of timing two films related to the beloved books and poems of A. A. Milne are headed to the movies.

The first is Goodbye Christopher Robin starring Domhnall Gleeson as A. A. Milne, Margot Robbie as his wife Daphne, as well as several actors who play Christopher at different ages.

The story focuses on Milne’s relationship with his son, the success of his books, and the effect the entire process had on Christopher himself. Variety describes it as “a bittersweet story of the little boy who inspired the Winnie-the-Pooh stories.”

It premieres October 13, 2017. The trailer is currently the #1 trending video on YouTube.

Disney is also making a film on the same subject, titled Christopher Robin. Ewan McGregor is set to star according to The Hollywood Reporter.

THR says the film will follow Christopher Robin as a grown up who has “lost his sense of imagination and is a businessman focused on work and success.”  Variety adds “Pooh and his friends reenter Robin’s life to help him gain that back.”

A premiere date has yet to be announced.

EVERY DAY, To the Movies

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

A feature film adaptation of David Levithan’s YA novel, Every Day (PRH/ Knopf Books for Young Readers; Listening Library), about a 16-year-boy who wakes up each morning in a new body, but still in love with the same girl, is set to begin production at the end of the month, reports Deadline, for release in 2018.

Australian actress Angourie Rice will star as the girl, Rhiannon. No other cast members have been announced. Michael Sucsy (HBO’s Grey Gardens 2009) will direct.

FERDINAND Gets a New Trailer

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017

The second  trailer for the Blue Sky adaptation of Munro Leaf ‘s 1936 classic The Story of Ferdinand has been released. The film opens on December 15.

WWE star and actor John Cena is the voice of Ferdinand. Also featured are SNL‘s Kate McKinnon, as well as Gina Rodriguez (Jane the Virgin), Daveed Diggs (Hamilton) and Bobby Cannavale.

9780670674244The book is still in print in hardcover and paperback (Penguin Young Readers/Puffin) and is being released as a board book in August.

 

Horn Book Award Winners

Monday, June 12th, 2017

The winners of the 2017 Horn Book – Boston Globe Awards were announced on May 31 during SLJ‘s Day of Dialog. The awards will be presented aceremony on Friday, October 6, 2017, at Boston’s Simmons College. A winner and two honor books are selected in each of three categories: Fiction and Poetry, Picture Book, and Nonfiction.

The Fiction and Poetry winner has become a key talking point and cultural phenomenon as well as a best seller. This is the first of many awards it is likely to win (titles published in the first half of 2017 are eligible for the Horn Book – Boston Globe Awards). It has already been selected as one of the best books of the year so far by the Washington Post and Entertainment Weekly. It is also set for a film adaptation starring Amandla Stenberg.

FICTION AND POETRY AWARD WINNER

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (HC/Balzer + Bray; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample).

Horn Book writes:

“Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter lives a life many African American teenagers can relate to: a life of double consciousness. Caught between her rough, predominantly black neighborhood and the “proper,” predominantly white prep school she attends, Starr has learned how to “speak with two different voices and only say certain things around certain people.” This precarious balance is broken when Starr witnesses the shooting of her (unarmed) childhood friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. What follows is a gut-wrenching chain of events that alters all Starr holds dear … Thomas has penned a powerful, in-your-face novel.”

Honor winners are One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance written by Nikki Grimes, illustrated by various artists (Macmillan/Bloomsbury Publishing; OverDrive Sample) and The Best Man by Richard Peck (PRH/Dial Books for Young Readers; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample).

PICTURE BOOK AWARD WINNER

Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan (S&S/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books/Atheneum Books for Young Readers; OverDrive Sample).

Horn Book says:

“A historical document dated July 5, 1828, lists the property to be sold from the Fairchilds’ estate. Hogs. Cattle. A handmill. Men. Women. Children. While no information beyond the gender and name — and price — of each of the eleven enslaved people is noted in the appraisal of the estate, Bryan lovingly restores their humanity and dignity, giving them ages, true African names, relationships, talents, hopes, and dreams … Bryan’s art is just as intentional. Facsimiles of the historical document serve as background for each slave’s introduction page, portraits of their faces taking precedence as they gaze out at the reader.”

Earlier, it was named a Newbery Honor Book , a Coretta Scott King (Author) Honor Book and a Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Honor Book.

Honor winners are Wolf in the Snow by Matthew Cordell (Macmillan/Feiwel & Friends; OverDrive Sample) and Town Is by the Sea by Joanne Schwartz, illustrated by Sydney Smith (Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press).

NONFICTION AWARD WINNER

Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers by Deborah Heiligman (Macmillan/Henry Holt; Dreamscape Audio; OverDrive Sample).

The Horn Book review says:

“After vividly setting the stage with brief sections that introduce Vincent and Theo near the end of their lives, Heiligman takes readers back to their beginnings. We learn of other siblings and of supportive parents; we gain a sense of their childhoods in their father’s parsonage. Structured as a walk through an art museum, the book proceeds through the years, each section a gallery … Heiligman mostly employs a present-tense, purposely staccato narration that effectively heightens the brothers’ emotional intensity, their sufferings and pleasures (physical, emotional, intellectual, aesthetic, and spiritual), and, most of all, Vincent’s wild and original art. The layout, which incorporates sketches, subheads, and a generous use of white space, is a calming counterpoint to the turbulent narrative … The result is a unique and riveting exploration of art, artists, and brotherly love.”

It was a National Book Award finalist.

Honor winners are Undefeated: Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School Football Team by Steve Sheinkin (Macmillan/Roaring Brook Press; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample) and Some Writer!: The Story of E. B. White by Melissa Sweet (HMH Books for Young Readers; OverDrive Sample).

The presentation video is online.

The judging panel included Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library (chair), Pauletta B. Bracy, North Carolina Central University, Durham, North Carolina; and Sheila M. Geraty, Brookwood School, Manchester, Massachusetts.

To Screen: DRAGON RIDER

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Cornelia Funke’s middle-grade novel about a boy who joins a young dragon named Firedrake on a quest for a magical place is headed to the movies.

The animated adaptation of Dragon Rider (Scholastic/Chicken House; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample) will be created byGerman studio , according to  The Hollywood Reporter, and directed by an award-wining German animator (Funke is also German).

The book has seen strong success in the US. It was #1 on the NYT Children’s Best Sellers list for over twenty nonconsecutive weeks and spent two years on the list overall. Booklist‘s starred review called it “a good, old-fashioned ensemble-cast quest in the style of Lloyd Alexander, with a bit of Puff the Magic Dragon added to the mix.”

Other titles by Funke have made their way to the screen. Both Inkheart and The Thief Lord have been made into films, although neither received glowing reviews.

No word yet on when the film will premiere.

The Newest DORK is a Boy

Thursday, June 8th, 2017

The team behind the best selling middle grade novels Dork Diaries, Rachel Renée Russell and her two daughters appeared on CBS This Morning on Tuesday, the release day for the second title in their new series,The Misadventures of Max Crumbly, Middle School Mayhem, (S&S/Aladdin).

Russell says she began Dork Diaries , about an awkward teen aged girl, when she “needed to jump-start” her career after “the house had been foreclosed on, cars had been repossessed” following a divorce. (Note: even though J.K. Rowling followed a similar path, writing childrens books is definitely not a guaranteed route to financial freedom). The 12th book in that series comes out in October. A film version is in development.

The Max Crumbly books are a bit of a departure in that the main character is a boy, but he is also a dork and is striving, as the Russells urge all their readers, to “Be The Hero You’ve Always Admired.”

During the interview the three women talk about how they work together and their hope that the humor in their new series will offer readers “a band-aid to help emotional wounds heal.”

To TV: Alex Rider

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

Anthony Horowitz’s bestselling Alex Rider novels, featuring a teenage spy recruited by MI6, are a step closer to becoming a TV series, reports Deadline Hollywood.

The UK indie studio Eleventh Hour Films is working with ITV to develop a “large-scale family series.” Deadline reports that the plan is to develop a “long-running series that’s re-imagined as an older-skewing family event drama. The adaptation will look to open the adult storylines to deliver a character-driven series that pushes the boundaries of the genre.”

Each book in the series will be treated in one season, starting with the second book, 2001’s Point Blank. The first book, Stormbreaker, has already been made into a film.

The 11th book in the series will be published in the US on Oct. 10, 2017, Never Say Die (PRH/Philomel Books).

No casting news or premiere date have been released.

WONDER, Film Trailer

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Auggie gets a face in the just released first full trailer for the film adaptation of R.J. Palacio’s Wonder (RH/Knopf Young Readers, 2012; Brilliance Audio; OverDrive Sample).

Directed by Stephen Chbosky (The Perks of Being a Wallflower), the film stars Jacob Tremblay (Room) as Auggie, a young boy with a facial deformity who enters a new school. Julia Roberts plays his mom, Owen Wilson, his dad, and Daveed Diggs (Hamilton), his classroom teacher.

The novel has spent 92 weeks on the NYT Children’s Middle Grade Hardcover list, where it is currently #2.

A tie-in comes out November 7, 2017, Wonder Movie Tie-In Edition by R. J. Palacio (PRH/Knopf Books for Young Readers). The cover is not yet finalized.

The film premieres November 17.

Live Chat with Tamara Bundy, Author of WALKING WITH MISS MILLIE

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017
Live Blog Live Chat with Tamara Bundy, WALKING WITH MISS MILLIE
 

BE THE ONE Rises

Friday, May 19th, 2017

ABC News chief national correspondent and Nightline co-anchor Byron Pitts just published a book about teens who overcome horrible circumstances ranging from bullying to abuse, addiction, and getting caught up in wars, Be the One: Six True Stories of Teens Overcoming Hardship with Hope (S&S; S&S Books for Young Readers; OverDrive Sample).

It is soaring on Amazon thanks to segments on The View and other shows, moving from #52,295 to #54.

Pitts knows the ground he covers. He tells The View he was raised by a very young single mother, did not learn to read until he was 13, and struggled with stuttering well into college. He says the teens he met were all dealt a bad hand. They opened a new world to him, illustrating the African proverb, “When you pray, move your feet.”

Booklist says the book “reads like an engrossing news program…Uplifting in its message and captivating in its content.”

Opening the Conversation on Teen Suicide

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

The controversy surrounding the Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, which some say “glamorizes” teen suicide, has brought new attention to the YA novel it is based on, one that has been challenged since it was published ten years ago.

Last night, Nightline showed another side of the story, reporting on a group of Michigan high school students who used the show as the inspiration to talk publicly about the events that made each of consider suicide, creating a video for their fellow students titled “13 Reasons Why Not.”

The result has been a dramatic change in the school’s culture, one that was deeply needed, says one of the participants in the project. As the book’s author Jay Asher has said, it is much more dangerous to try to shut down the conversation than to bring it into the open.

Hitting Screens, Week of May 15, 2017

Monday, May 15th, 2017

The heavily promoted adaptation of Nicola Yoon’s debut YA novel  Everything, Everything opens on May 19. The book debuted at #1 on the NYT  Young Adult best seller list and stayed on it for over a year. The release of the trailer in February brought the book back to the list, again at #1

About a teen girl confined to her house because of severe allergies, the novel earned a glowing NYT review (“gorgeous and lyrical”) and an A- review from Entertainment Weekly (a “complex,” “fresh, moving debut”).

The film stars Amandla Stenberg (who played Rue in The Hunger Games) and Nick Robinson (Zach in Jurassic World). Stella Meghie (Jean of the Joneses) directs.

Tie-in:  Everything, Everything Movie Tie-in Edition, (in hardcover: PRH/Delacorte Press; April 18, 2017; ISBN 9781524769802; 18.99; Listening Library; also in paperback: PRH/Ember; April 4, 2017; ISBN 9781524769604; $10.99).

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul premieres on May 19. It is based on the 9th title in the popular kids series written by Jeff Kinney.

The three previous films in the series have been commercial, although not critical successes. The new film, featuring a fresh cast including Alicia Silverstone, Tom Everett Scott, Charlie Wright, and Jason Drucker, follows a family road trip.

Tie-in: Diary of a Wimpy Kid # 9: Long Haul: The Long Haul by Jeff Kinney (Abrams; OverDrive Sample).

Also opening May 19th is Wakefield, an adaptation of E.L. Doctorow’s short story of the same name. Starring Bryan Cranston and Jennifer Garner, it tells the story of a man who “vanishes” but really only hides in his garage spying on the lives of his family and neighbors.

Both Variety and The Hollywood Reporter posted reviews in 2016 when the film was making the festival circuit. While praising Cranston’s performance, Variety says the ending is “a cop-out.The Hollywood Reporter agrees that Cranston “is the whole show” and calls the film “decreasingly convincing.”

It opens in limited release . There is no tie-in. The short story was published in The New Yorker in 2008.

Airing on May 21st is A Bundle of Trouble, a Hallmark adaptation of Charlaine Harris’s Aurora Teagarden series featuring a crime-solving librarian.

There are nine books in the series. This newest adaptation is based on the sixth, titled A Fool And His Honey (PRH/Berkley; OverDrive Sample). This is also the 6th Hallmark adaptation, following A Bone To Pick, Real Murders, Three Bedrooms One Corpse, The Julius House, and Dead Over Heels.

The show stars Candace Cameron Bure (Full House) as the librarian sleuth. There is no tie-in, although the book is still available. See the Hallmark site for a preview (unfortunately we cannot embed the clip).

As we posted in the May 15th Titles to Know, HBO is adapting The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust by Diana B. Henriques (Macmillan/St. Martin’s Griffin; Tantor Media; OverDrive Sample).

It premieres May 20 and stars Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer. Barry Levinson directs.

See our earlier post for more details.

WONDERSTRUCK

Monday, May 15th, 2017

Both the movie poster, left, and a clip have been released for Todd Haynes’s Wonderstruck, based on Brian Selznick’s 2011 illustrated novel. The movie will debut at the Cannes Film Festival on May 18 and in US theaters in limited release on October 20, with the promise of a wide release sometime in mid-November.

The book, set in 1927 and 1977, features two deaf children, Ben and Rose, each within their own time line, each secretly longing for different lives. As the story unfolds, the tales of both children weave back and forth before finally coming together.

The film co-stars Julianne Moore and Michelle Williams. Oakes Fegley (Pete’s Dragon) plays Ben and newcomer Millicent Simmonds, who is deaf, plays Rose.

Selznick wrote the adapted screenplay. Below he describes how he wrote the novel:


Expect some creative film making to match the creativity of the novel. Movie Pilot writes “Rose’s half of the movie will be shot as a silent film! This will allow the movie to stay faithful to the novel, capture the world through the eyes of Rose, and recreate the aesthetic of the silent film era.”

Wonderstruck is the sixth film that Roadside has distributed with Amazon Studios. The two companies biggest success so far is Manchester by the Sea, which won two Oscars and was the biggest box office success to date for both companies.

The fight to keep theaters viable in an age of streaming services and high definition TV has led the Cannes Festival, like many film events, including the Oscars, to limit eligibility to movies  that are released to theaters before hitting small screens.

Things are becoming more complex now that streaming services have also gotten in to producing their own movies. Overturning their rule against streaming services sast year, Cannes accepted five of Amazon Studios films as entries into the competition, because Amazon execs “promised that, unlike Netflix, all of their films will go out in theaters, holding to the traditional 90-day theatrical window,” writes the Hollywood Reporter, adding that it makes business sense for Amazon,

“Unlike Netflix, which operates its streaming service in virtually every country in the world … Amazon’s Prime Video service is not available in France, in Italy, in Canada, Spain, Australia, Russia or Brazil. A global day-and-date rollout, the cornerstone of Netflix’ release strategy, still is impossible for Amazon.”