Archive for the ‘Seasons’ Category

Hitting Screens, Week of June 26, 2017

Monday, June 26th, 2017

The upcoming weekend brings the latest in the family film franchise, Despicable Me 3 (see our earlier story for tie-ins), the debut of one adaptation and the continuation of a James Patterson TV series.

Fresh from winning Best Director at the Cannes Film Festival, only the second time a woman has done so in 71 years, Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled opens in theaters on June 30th [CORRECTION: the film opened in 4 theaters last week and did well. It expands to 500 locations on Friday].

Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell, Elle Fanning, and Kirsten Dunst star in the film about a group of women sequestered in a Southern girls boarding school during the Civil War and the wounded Union soldier who arrives at their doorstep. (See our earlier post for more on the novel and its adaptations).

Reviews vary widely. Entertainment Weekly calls it “a film that radiates with thrilling, deliciously dark southern gothic flair” and CNN credits it with being “a small-scale movie that exalts old-fashioned movie-making qualities, yielding a refreshingly understated alternative to a sea of summer blockbusters.”

On the other hand, USA Today writes, “While Coppola creates some gorgeous imagery, the drama amounts to an overly pretentious version of a sudsy made-for-TV movie, complete with bodice ripping.”

Coppola appeared on CBS This Morning to promote the film, talking about the cast and her vision for the story.

Tie-in edition: The Beguiled: A Novel (Movie Tie-In), Thomas Cullinan (PRH/Penguin; OverDrive Sample).

James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge’s Zoo returns to CBS for its third season on June 29; it stars Nonso Anozie, Nora Arnezeder, Billy Burke, Kristen Connolly, and James Wolk.

The first two seasons focused on how the animal kingdom turned on humans and began hunting them down. Humans developed a gas to stop them, but it had an unpleasant side effect. Rotten Tomatoes describes new series, “Ten years after the animals were cured but at the cost of sterilizing the human population, a new threat rises in the form of ‘the hybrids,’ an army of unstoppable lab-made creatures focused on destroying mankind.”

There was a tie-in for season one, the Zoo story was extended as one of Patterson BookShotsZoo 2, and is also a graphic novel. There is no tie-in for season 3.

Brain Exercise from the D.O.D.O.

Sunday, June 25th, 2017

The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland (HarperCollins/Morrow; HaperAudio; OverDrive Sample) debuts on the NYT Hardcover Fiction list this week at #11. It is the lead feature in the paper’s “Inside the List” column, which calls it “a fat marshmallow of a fantasy novel.”

The book, “about a time-traveling intelligence officer and a Harvard linguist who discover that magic was once commonplace” is a collaboration between the noted SF writer and the historical novelist, furthering the trend of genre blending. The NYT asks “If you co-write a book about magic, is that crowd-sorcery?”

Defending the book’s length, 768 pages, Stephenson says “The practice of sustained attention is something that’s happening less and less, especially in our leisure time, so a long narrative, and one that’s this intricate, which requires that you’re always plugged in, because there are various things going on at once — I think that that’s a great exercise. I would assign this book as a brain exercise, as well as a jolly good read.”

It also debuts the USA Today list at #29 and is the #1 Indie Next pick for July. Entertainment Weekly names it one of their “20 Must-Read Books” of the summer. Booklist and Kirkus star, with the latter calling it “Immense and immensely entertaining.” The Guardian reviews it, writing that it is “big, roomy and enjoyable … The characters are lively, the plot moves along and the whole thing possesses heart and charm.” The Washington Post calls it “ambitious” and says “There’s a lot going on here — stylistic flourishes, comedic pratfalls, romance and science — but it’s handled deftly.”

Titles to Know and Recommend, Week of June 26, 2017

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

 

Several recognized names return next week, including one that is rarely absent, James Patterson, the holds leader for the week with Murder Games (Hachette/Little, Brown; Blackstone Audio; Hachette Large Print; OverDrive Sample; OverDrive Audio Sample). It’s been optioned for a CBS series, Dr. Death, to star Alan Cumming. The Patterson name will also appear on a TV series at the end of the week, when the third season of Zoo begins on 6/30/17.

Diana Gabaldon gives fans an amuse bouche as they await season three of Starz Outlander series, which begins in September, and as they also await the ninth title in the book series, Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone, not yet scheduled for publication. Coming next week is Seven Stones to Stand or Fall: A Collection of Outlander Fiction (PRH/Delacorte; Recorded Books). Entertainment Weekly offers an excerpt.

Exploring a new format, Marie Kondo spins off her major best seller with the a manga version, The Life-Changing Manga of Tidying Up (PRH/TenSpeed). In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Kondo recounts discovering that her father was deeply influenced by the manga Black Jack by Osamu Tezuka, about whether doctors should prolong life at all costs, or focus on the quality of life. She says it influenced many people, including her father, to enter the medical profession.

The titles covered here, and several other notable titles arriving next week, are listed with ordering information and alternate formats, on our downloadable spreadsheet, EarlyWord New Title Radar, Week of 6/26/17.

Peer Picks

Two LibraryReads titles arrive this week.

The Child, Fiona Barton (PRH/Berkley; RH Large Print; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample).

“When a baby skeleton is unearthed at a construction site, reporter Kate Waters thinks it is a story worth investigating. As she digs into the mystery of the child, she uncovers more than she bargained for. Told from the viewpoints of various characters, Barton tells an intriguing tale about the newborn baby and all the characters involved, leaving it up to the readers to put together the connections until the very end.” — Annice Sevett, New Hanover County Public Library, Wilmington, NC

Additional Buzz: It is one of three People magazine book picks of the week. LitHub names it one of “5 Crime Must-Reads Coming In June,” writing “Barton is a top-notch suspense writer, throwing in realistic and chilling twists to this compelling book.” It headlines Bustle‘s “The 18 Best Fiction Books Coming Out in June 2017.” They call it an “edge-of-your-seat thriller.” Time picks it as one of “The Top 10 Thrillers to Read This Summer.”

The Waking Land, Callie Bates (PRH/Del Rey; Random House Audio; OverDrive Sample).

“Lady Elanna Voltai flees her adopted homeland when the king, who raised her like a daughter, dies under mysterious circumstances and Elanna is accused of murder. Forced to return to the magical homeland of her birth and her estranged father who was branded a traitor for inciting rebellion, Elanna must come to terms with the life she left behind and her destiny. I loved watching Elanna find her voice and her strength, and the rich world of magic around her makes this story even more fantastic!” — Jessica Perham, Schaumburg Township Library, Schaumburg, IL

Additional Buzz: It is also an Indie Next pick.

Three additional Indie Next titles will also be published this week:

The Windfall, Diksha Basu (PRH/Crown; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample).

“The Jhas are a fairly normal family in Delhi, but when Mr. Jha sells his company for millions and decides to move himself and his wife to a fancy new neighborhood, he sets in motion changes for not only his wife, but also his son studying in New York and his former and future neighbors — changes that are sometimes good, sometimes bad, and uncomfortable either way. Jam-packed with fun and lovable characters, this novel is both a delicious, gossipy indulgence and a fascinating glimpse into the lives of people very different from one another. Those who loved the drama of The Nest will adore this warm, tender, and very funny debut from a fresh new voice.” —Kelly Morton, Joseph-Beth Booksellers, Cincinnati, OH

Additional Buzz: It is on The MillionsJune Preview: The Millions Most Anticipated (This Month) and the New York Post‘s “The 29 best books of the summer.” Good Housekeeping names it one of “The 21 Best New Books for Summer 2017.”

Spoonbenders, Daryl Gregory (PRH/Knopf; RH Large Print; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample).

“The Amazing Telemachus Family is unlike any other. Patriarch Teddy is a con man whose adult children possess remarkable psychic gifts (telekinesis, lie detection, and clairvoyance), but the loss of their mother leaves the entire family reeling. Though the Telemachus crew’s misadventures attract the attention of everyone from the CIA to a scary local crime boss, Teddy and his children are more threatened by their own emotional damage and sketchy past than anything else. Gregory’s characters are sharply drawn and lovable, and he tells their story in a way that’s wise, warm, and entertaining throughout. With a strong sense of humor and an amazing climax, this is the kind of novel that’s an absolute blast to read.” —Erika VanDam, RoscoeBooks, Chicago, IL

Additional Buzz: It is on Elle‘s “Guide to the Best Books of the Summer” and is one of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette‘s book editor’s “picks for summer 2017.SyfyWire puts it on their “Fangrrls June sci-fi/fantasy book preview.”

Drunks: An American History, Christopher Finan (Beacon Press; Blackstone Audio; OverDrive Sample).

“The long and evolving history of alcoholism and corresponding sobriety movements in America is fascinating, for both its colorful characters and its complex interface with religion and the sciences. In Finan’s astute, well-researched, and entertaining narrative, this story of sober drunks offers both understanding and insight into a critically important subject whose nature has long been occluded and subsumed in stigma.” —Kenny Brechner, Devaney Doak & Garrett Booksellers, Farmington, ME

Tie-ins

The mass market tie-in arrives for The Dark Tower I (MTI): The Gunslinger by Stephen King (S&S/Pocket; S&S Audio; OverDrive Sample).

As we wrote earlier, the movie opens August 4, 2017 and stars Matthew McConaughey and Idris Elba.

The NYT has a guide to what you need to know about the story.

Two tie-ins also arrive for the animated Emoji movie. Premiering on July 28, it is set inside the world of a cell phone and stars TJ Miller, Anna Faris, James Corden, and many more, playing characters such as Hi-5, Meh, Smiler, and Fist Bump.

Responding to the trailer, The Guardian says it “may be one of the most conceptually baffling films ever to be put into production.”

 

 

 

 

 

The Emoji Movie Junior Novelization adapted by Tracey West, (S&S/Simon Spotlight).

Break Out! adapted by Cordelia Evans, illustrated by Andy Bialk (S&S/Simon Spotlight; also in trade paperback).

For our full list of upcoming adaptations, download our Books to Movies and TV and link to our listing of tie-ins.

John Green, New Novel

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Turtles All the Way Down is the title of John Green’s next YA novel, (PRH/Dutton Books for Young Readers; 9780525555360; cover not finalized) releasing on October 10. It is his first novel in six years, following 2012’s The Fault in Our Stars.

Entertainment Weekly reports it is “the story of 16-year-old Aza Holmes, a young woman who grapples with mental illness while investigating the disappearance of a fugitive billionaire.”

Green says “This is my first attempt to write directly about the kind of mental illness that has affected my life since childhood, so while the story is fictional, it is also quite personal.”

He announced the book on Twitter in a very brief notice.

The title refers to a story which Stephen Hawking relates in A Brief History of Time. Faced with the theory that the world is flat, held on the back of a turtle, a famous astronomer asks what the turtle stands on. The answer reveals the illogic of the theory, “But it’s turtles all the way down!”

It’s just one of many metaphors readers can expect, according to the Penguin’s UK site, quoting Green, “The great thing about figurative language and symbols and the like in novels is that you don’t have to be conscious of them for them to work.”

UPDATE: Green talks about the book in a bonus Vlogbrothers video, below. He invites viewers to post questions about it and promises to try to answer them on his next video, scheduled for Tuesday, June 27.

Holds Alert: THE IDENTICALS

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

Author Elin Hilderbrand hits a career high this week. Her latest book, The Identicals (Hachette/Little, Brown; Hachette LP; Hachette Audio; OverDrive Sample), debuts at No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list, right behind John Grisham’s Camino Island. Her highest ranking to date was last year’s Here’s To Us, which debuted at #4.

Holds are also high, running at 5:1 or above at the majority of libraries we checked.

The eighteenth in a series of titles set on Nantucket in the summer, USA Today writes, “Hilderbrand’s books are basically a seasonal staple, as important to beach reading as sunscreen and sand.”

Hilderbrand is the subject of a NYT‘s “By the Book” feature, answering “Lorrie Moore” to the question which writer she admires most. She says “[Moore] is a writer’s writer. Her long stories are absolutely, hands-down the best pieces of writing that exist, in my opinion.”

RAVEN ROCK Rises

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

NPR’s Fresh Air sends Raven Rock: The Story of the U.S. Government’s Secret Plan to Save Itself–While the Rest of Us Die by Garrett M. Graff (S&S; S&S Audio; OverDrive Sample) skyrocketing up the Amazon charts, moving to #25 from #1,933.

Graff’s book explores newly declassified government plans for continuity in case of disaster, written at the start of the atomic era and elaborated upon during the Cold War. Host Terry Gross calls it “a mix of the terrifying, the absurd, and the bureaucratic.”

Graff tells Gross about one of the shelter bunkers for chosen government officials:

“Raven Rock is this massive, hollowed-out mountain. It’s a free-standing city … [with] three-story buildings. It has everything that a small city would — there’s a fire department there, there’s a police department, medical facilities, dining halls. The dining facility serves four meals a day, it’s a 24 hour facility … today [it] could hold as many as 5,000 people in the event of an emergency.”

As for his subtitle, Graff says that at the start of the planning process the government thought most of the population would survive an attack but now the plan is that “The civilian population will be left to itself for weeks or months at a time, and a small number of senior government officials will be spirited out to these bunkers with the hope that within months or a few years they’re able to reconstitute something that resembles the United States again.”

New Attention for FLOWER MOON

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI (PRH/Doubleday; RH Large Print; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample) is rising on Amazon’s sales rankings again, after an appearance on ABC’s The View during which Grann enthralled the hosts with the story of a series of all but forgotten crimes perpetrated on a group of Native Americans.

The book has been on the NYT‘s Hardcover Nonfiction list for eight weeks, rising as high as #4, currently at #11. It is #2 on Entertainment Weekly’s “The 10 Best Books of the Year so Far.

LibraryReads and an Indie Next pick. it was on a number of best spring book lists. As we have previously posted, the film rights were sold in a hot auction for 5 million, roughly a year before the book hit shelves. Variety says it “was one of the highest prices paid for movie rights in recent memory.”

Dog Finds Man

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

A stray dog nabs herself a multi book and movie deal.

A tiny but hardy pup, approached ultra-marathoner Dion Leonard during a long distance race in China across part of the Gobi Desert. She stayed with him, running nearly 80 miles. Leonard named her after the desert.

Her story, and his, gets even more dramatic. Once the run was over Gobi disappeared in a Chinese city while Leonard was raising funds to adopt her and take her back to his home in Scotland. An international effort launched on the Internet helped find her, hurt but ultimately OK.

He says that he has no idea why she came to him in the wilderness, “whether it was my smell — we don’t shower during the week in these races — or whether it was something else, whether it was a past life connection. It was definitely fate and I’m so glad that she chose me … she’s brought lots of joy to people around the globe with our story.”

That story is captured in Finding Gobi: A Little Dog with a Very Big Heart by Dion Leonard with Craig Borlase (HC/Thomas Nelson, June 13; Thomas Nelson Audio; OverDrive Sample).

Coming August 9 are YA and children’s versions:

 

 

 

 

 

Finding Gobi: Young Reader’s Edition: The True Story of One Little Dog’s Big Journey by Dion Leonard, adapted by Aaron Rosenberg (HC/Thomas Nelson).

Gobi: A Little Dog with a Big Heart by Dion Leonard, illustrated by Lisa Manuzak (HC/Thomas Nelson).

A board book comes out in early 2018, Gobi for Little Ones: The Race for Home by Dion Leonard, illustrated by Lisa Manuzak (HC/Thomas Nelson).

Twentieth Century Fox is developing the movie. Variety reports the studio “has preemptively acquired the film rights to the book.”

A portion of the proceeds from Leonard’s book will go to help other dogs in China.

Live Chat with Ann Dee Ellis,
Author of YOU MAY ALREADY
BE A WINNER

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

Today’s chat has now ended. Read the transcript below.

Live Blog Live Chat with Ann Dee Ellis, YOU MAY ALREADY BE A WINNER
 

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE, First Trailer

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

9781250121462_c1182The first trailer for Dreamworks’ adaptation of David Finkel’s 2013 award-winning Thank You For Your Service has been released.

Oscar-nominated Jason Hall (for Best Adapted Screenplay, American Sniper) wrote the script and makes his directorial debut. Miles Teller (War Dogs) leads the large cast which also includes Haley Bennett (The Girl on the Train) and Amy Schumer (Trainwreck) in what is billed as her first non-comedic role.

The film opens in theaters on October 27, 2017. As Variety reports, the release date is timed for awards season.

The book follows a group of soldiers as they try to adjust to civilian life after returning home from fighting in Baghdad, although the movie appears to focus on just one of them. A critical success, it was reviewed by the NYT, Washington Post, NPR, and The Guardian, shortlisted for a National Book Critics Circle Award and selected as a NYT‘s Notable Books of 2013.

tie-in edition (Macmillan/Picador; Macmillan Audio) arrives in September.

Sedaris On His Compulsion

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

PBS Newshour interviews humorist David Sedaris.

His new book, Theft by Finding (Hachette/Little Brown; Blackstone Audio; OverDrive Sample) is based on his diaries. Keeping a diary, he says, is something that people regard as disciplined, but for him, it’s a compulsion, something he does when he “should be out doing things.”

The book is currently #4 on the New York Times Hardcover Non-fiction list, after debuting last week at #3.

Telling His Story

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

In his just-released memoir, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me (Hachette/Little, Brown; Blackstone Audio; OverDrive Sample), Sherman Alexie writes about growing up in poverty and enduring violence so severe that he still suffers from PTSD. Discussing the book with Terry Gross on NPR’s Fresh Air, he begins by reading a passage bout trying to escape a family holiday party full of violent and dangerous people.

Yet, he says, “despite all my past and current mental illnesses, despite any pain that I have, that my life … is something amazing, and I’m grateful for that.”

The book made a strong move on the Amazon charts as a result, jumping into the Top 100 at #38, up from #410.

Claiming Space

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

Roxane Gay talks with Terry Gross on NPR’s Fresh Air about her new book, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body (HC/Harper; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample), proving the least interesting thing about her is her much-noted size.

In a smart and candid talk she tells Gross it is a book that felt necessary to write for the very fact it was the book she wanted to write least, “I was just dreading writing the book” she says, “while still feeling like this was a necessary book to write.”

Through the book she offers readers a story of her body as it is now and “what her body had endured” when she was young; she was gang raped at 12, betrayed and set up for a planned attack by a boy she trusted and a group of his friends.

She goes on to talk about her life now, about being fat, and the ways society is threatened by what she calls an “unruly body.”

Reviews are very strong. USA Today calls it “a thing of raw beauty” and writes “This wrenching work … is a yearning to be unburdened of secrets … Gay takes us on a journey in which we learn what it is to exist in a society that accuses you of taking up too much room, even as it refuses to yield a place for you.”

Literary Hub‘s Book Marks rounds up more reviews, many are raves such as the LA Times, which writes it is “a bracingly vivid account of how intellect, emotion and physicality speak to each other and work in tireless tandem to not just survive unspeakable hurt, but to create a life worth living and celebrating.”

The Atlantic says the book is “arresting and candid. At its best, it affords women, in particular, something so many other accounts deny them—the right to take up space they are entitled to, and to define what that means.”

It is currently #28 on Amazon’s Top 100 and has been moving upwards since its publication date. Holds are high in a number of libraries we checked, some topping 5:1.

AMERICAN ASSASSIN, Trailer

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

The first full-length trailer for the movie based on Vince Flynn’s American Assassin has been released. Deadline reports that this may be the launch of a new “action hero franchise … built on a deep well of bestselling novels by the late Vince Flynn … in a revenge tale that could be the start of a Jack Ryan-like journey for [Dylan] O’Brien’s Mitch Rapp character.”

Also starring Michael Keaton, the film opens on Sept. 15

American Assassin is the eleventh title in the book series, chosen because it moves back in time to depict Rapp’s first assignment. Tie-ins will be released in August.
American Assassin: A Thriller
Vince Flynn
S&S/Atria; August 15, 2017
Trade Paperback
Mass Market
S&S Audio

Hitting Screens, Week of June 19, 2017

Monday, June 19th, 2017

There are no film adaptations opening this week but four TV series based on books premiere.

Grantchester returned yesterday for season three on PBS Masterpiece.

James Norton (Happy Valley) stars as vicar Sidney Chambers with Robson Green playing Inspector Geordie Keating. The two get caught up in even more mysteries as Sidney must decide if he will follow his heart with his long lost love or follow his church and abide by his moral calling.

The newest book in the series was published in May, Sidney Chambers and the Persistence of Love by James Runcie (Macmillan/Bloomsbury USA; also in trade paperback; OverDrive Sample). It is stickered to connect it to the PBS series although it is not a direct tie-in to the new season.

Queen Sugar premieres on Tuesday, June 20.

See our earlier post for full details, and note there is a tie-in:

Queen Sugar: A Novel (TV Tie-In), Natalie Baszile (PRH/Penguin; OverDrive Sample).

The TV adaptation of Stephen King’s novella The Mist debuts on Spike TV on June 22. It details the terror that grips a community when a strange vapor invades a small town.

The story is contained in the new edition of Skeleton Crew: Stories by Stephen King (S&S/Pocket; S&S Audio; OverDrive Sample).

The Washington Post includes it on their rundown of “Summer TV 2017,” giving it a C+ and calling it “a 10-episode Walking Dead-type survival of the fittest.”

Entertainment Weekly offers insights into the newest creepfest of a trailer.

Preacher returns to AMC for season 2 on June 25. It is based on the comic series of the same name by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon.

GQ calls the original an “iconic and maniacally violent comic book from the 1990s about faith and God and true love and the American dream,” but found the first season of the TV show “uneven” and the final episode “a bummer.” They offer several ways season two can be redeemed.

Entertainment Weekly was kinder, giving season one a B and writing “For all its frustrations, season 1 was always funny and always fun to watch.” The NYT was on board too, writing it “packs apocalypse, horror, religion, dirty realism and dime-store westerns into its glass jar, then sets the whole bloody mixture on purée.”

There is no direct tie-in. The comics ended in 2000 and have been published in trade paperback collections, hardcover editions, and most recently, expensive absolute editions (archival quality restored and recolored versions collecting an entire comic run in one or two volumes). Absolute Preacher Vol. 2 by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon (DC Comics/Vertigo) was just published, priced at $150.