Archive for the ‘2017 — Fall’ Category

GalleyChatters Predict:
Fall/Winter Reading Trends

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

The trend for psychological thrillers has had amazing longevity. With so many new titles published in the genre, fans are becoming more and more demanding.

Two titles were mentioned most often during last week’s GalleyChat as the best of the upcoming crop:

 

The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018) — please join us for a chat with the author, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 4 to 5 pm. ET, Chat window will be posted at 3 pm on EarlyWord.com

Sometimes I Lie, Alice Feeney, (Macmillan/Flatiron, March 13, 2018) — this one is SO twisty, that it lost several readers. The title itself warns readers that this is they’re dealing with the ultimate in unreliable narrators.

Nods also went to:

   

The Last Mrs. Parrish, Liv Constantine, (Harper, October 17)

Poison, Galt Niederhoffer, (Macmillan/ St. Martin’s, November 21)

The Wife Between Us, Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, January 9, 2018)

If you’re not a fan of the genre, or just need a palate cleanser, there’s much to tempt you from the nearly 130 titles getting enthusiastic endorsements (see the Edelweiss catalog here).

For those hoping to sniff out the next trend, Marika Zemke of Commerce Twp. (MI) Public Library makes a strong case for medical narratives and survival stories, saying people crave them these days. With hurricanes and fires raging and a chaotic federal government, that seems to make sense. She offers  the following as examples:

     

The Encore: A Memoir in Three Acts, Charity Tillemann-Dick, (S&S/Atria, October 3) — an opera singer continues her career despite having BOTH lungs transplanted.

Counting Backwards: A Doctor’s Notes on Anesthesia, Henry Jay Przybylo, (Norton, November 14), — “takes you past the forbidden operating room doors into the O.R.”

In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Awdish, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, October 24)  — A doctor learns first hand the flaws in current medical practice when she nearly dies herself.

The Cookie Cure: A Mother/Daughter Memoir of Cookies and Cancer, Susan Stachler, Laura Stachler, (Sourcebooks, February 1, 2018)   — “an almost unbelievable story of medical coincidence.”

Some of you may remember an earlier time when medical narratives were all the rage. GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower says they’ve never gone out of style for her. She remembers, “Back in the late 70s I read Elder’s And I Alone Survived, which fueled my obsession with survival stories. My medical obsession started in the early 1970s with James Kerr’s soap opera-ish novel The Clinic and, of course, Hailey’s Diagnosis. About 30 years ago Echo Heron published Intensive Care, about her stint as a nurse, along with Carol Gino’s The Nurse’s Story. Like many library patrons, I couldn’t get enough of these kinds of stories.”

Below is a transcript. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

Dunkirk Set to Storm Theaters

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

The WWII movie Dunkirk opens on July 21. Directed by Christopher Nolan, known for creating major blockbusters, including his Batman trilogy, it stars Fionn Whitehead, Tom Glynn-Carney, Jack Lowden, Harry Styles, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy, Mark Rylance, and Tom Hardy. The Hollywood Reporter calls it “one of the most anticipated movies of summer.”

IndieWire has a rundown of elements to watch for and things to note, including Nolan’s telling the Associated Press that “Dunkirk is not a war film. It’s a survival story and first and foremost a suspense film.”

    

Although not based on a specific book, several tie-ins are being published including the lead title, Dunkirk: The History Behind the Major Motion Picture by Joshua Levine (HarperCollins/Morrow Paperbacks; HarperAudio; also in Mass Market; OverDrive Sample), followed by Dunkirk, the screenplay by Christopher Nolan (IPG/Faber & Faber) and the coffee table book, The Making of Dunkirk by James Mottram, with a forward by the director (S&S/Insight Editions).

Coincidentally, Michael Korda’s upcoming book is also about the battle,  Alone: Britain, Churchill, and Dunkirk: Defeat Into Victory (Norton/Liveright, forthcoming Sept. 19).

GALLEYCHATTER, June 2017, BookExpo SPECIAL EDITION

Monday, June 26th, 2017

Editors Note: Each month, librarians gather for our online GalleyChats to talk about their favorite forthcoming titles. GalleyChatter columnist Robin Beerbower rounds up the most-mentioned titles from this month’s chat below.
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During the post-Book Expo GalleyChat, those who had just returned from the show were eager to share newly discovered galleys they had lugged home. As we head in to the Fourth of July holiday, consider downloading digital review copies of these titles from Edelweiss or NetGalley.

If you fall in love any of these titles, be sure to consider nominating them for  LibraryReads. We’ve noted in red the deadlines for those titles that can still be nominated.

For a complete list of the 148 titles mentioned during the chat, check here.

Librarians’ Lunch Standouts

The AAP/LibraryReads lunch for librarians at Book Expo was a sold out affair with the usual stellar line-up of authors. The MC was “America’s Librarian” Nancy Pearl, who has written her first novel, George and Lizzie (S&S/Touchstone, September; LibraryReads deadline: July 20) about the meeting and marriage of sweet, practical George and the always dissatisfied Lizzie. Stephanie Chase, director of Hillsboro (OR) Public Library says, “Lizzie will jump out at you from the beginning, and whether you immediately love her, as I did, or hate her, you must give her a chance, for along the way, you’ll meet the wonderful Marla and James, and George’s fantastic parents, Lizzie’s not-so-fantastic parents, and George, of course.”

Gabrielle Zevin also charmed the audience. Her first book for adults, The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry was a hit with readers. Her next, Young Jane Young (Workman/Algonquin, August), a novel about reinvention after an indiscretion, is quickly gathering fans. Jennifer Winberry from says, “After having an affair with the local congressman for whom she is interning, Aviva Grossman finds herself unable to show her face in her Florida town and get a job.  Aviva changes her name and flees for a small town in Maine where she and her daughter live a relatively quiet life until she decides to run for local office and her past is dredged up. Told in alternating voices, families, relationships, and double standards all come to light making this a great choice for book groups.”

Buzz-Worthy Titles

Word spread fast about Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere (PRH/Penguin Press, September; LibraryReads deadline: July 20) causing galleys to fly out of the publisher’s booth. Frequent GalleyChat contributor Cynthia Baskin is an early admirer and says, “This terrific sophomore effort is about two dysfunctional families whose lives intersect and overlap in healthy and not-so-healthy ways. Although the main event is known from the beginning, the story builds tension slowly as Ng very deliberately peels away the characters’ interpersonal layers.  If you like domestic dramas, I highly recommend this book!”

Another galley that was difficult to find due to pre-pub buzz was Brendan Mathews family saga, World of Tomorrow (Hachette/Little, Brown, September; LibraryReads deadline: July 20; DRC on NetGalley). Jen Dayton, collection development librarian from Darien, CT, wasted no time before reading it. She reports, “Set over a week in June of 1939, we follow three Irish brothers as they interact with a cast of characters that include a member of the IRA, a Hungarian refugee, the ghost of Yeats, a Deb on the make and her plotting mother, and a ward boss looking for just a little respect.  But the true star of this novel is New York City in all her prewar glitz, glitter and grit.”

Chloe Benjamin’s The Immortalists (PRH/Putnam’s, January; LibraryReads deadline: Nov. 20; DRC on NetGalley), touted during Book Expo’s Book Buzz, is the story of a family’s life based on a psychic’s predicted death dates of each sibling. Andrienne Cruz predicts it will be a hit saying, “Four siblings dared to find out when they will die and face the consequence of this knowledge. This novel is filled with rich characters who seamlessly inhabit the pages. I am reminded of Pat Conroy’s books-with unflinching honesty and an electrifying setting in various decades set in New York, Las Vegas and San Francisco.” This is also a good candidate for those who want to read about family dysfunction similar to Hilma Wolitzer’s The Interestings and Cynthia Sweeney’s The Nest.

Set in the mountains and small towns of Oregon, Rene Denfeld’s The Child Finder (HarperColllins/Harper, September; LibraryReads deadline: July 20) is poised to be a big hit. Denfeld has taken a topic that could be disturbing and has made the characters believable and empathetic, even the ones that don’t appear to deserve any compassion. Meeting the author was a BEA highlight. Remember the words “radical empathy.” Kimberly McGee from Lake Travis Community Library (TX) also loved it saying, “Naomi, also known as The Child Finder, is in search of a little girl who is lost in the woods – three years ago. Not only did the ‘snow child’ survive but she may not feel like a captive. We see through Naomi’s eyes that the circumstances of all the missing may take many forms. This multi-layered novel is quiet and heartbreaking and violent all at once.”

Death Becomes Her

Mortician Caitlin Doughty’s first book, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory was one of my 2015 favorite books and I am pleased to say From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death (Norton, October; LibraryReads deadline: August 20) should prove to be just as popular. Journeying to various countries to research the ways cultures handle their dead might not be everybody’s idea for an adventure vacation but Caitlin is dedicated to ensuring that death is not only handled with respect but also endeavors to erase the stigma and fear of dead bodies. This is perfect for fans of Mary Roach’s Stiff.

Thrillers We Can’t Wait to Recommend

Three psychological suspense novels stood out with mentions by several presenters at the annual Book Expo Librarians’ Shout ‘n Share.

The first to receive multiple mentions was The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn (HarperCollins/Morrow, January; LibraryReads deadline: Nov 20) and even though it won’t be published until January, it is already garnering “much love” on Edelweiss (31 votes as of 6/21/17). Everyone of us who has read this marvelous piece of suspense want to start recommending it to readers now. Marika Zemke, Head of Adult Services at Commerce Township Public Library (MI), says, “Psychologist Anna Fox suffers from agoraphobia, and spends her days watching old, classic movies and drinking too much wine. She also watches her neighbors through her camera and one night as she’s spying on the new neighbors she sees something unthinkable. Or did she? This novel has the perfect number of twists that will keep readers guessing, from the very first page, until they close the book.” Expect high demand for this one.

Another domestic thriller that received multiple “shouts” was Liv Constantine’s The Last Mrs. Parrish (HarperCollins, October; LibraryReads deadline: August 20), a twisty novel about a plain nobody who worms her way into a wealthy woman’s life, only to find her careful plan in danger of collapsing. Stephanie Chase, Hillsboro (OR) Library’s library director, forecasts, “This is the successor to Gone Girl: sex, intrigue, and deceit.”

Galleys of The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen (Macmillan/St. Martin’s; January; LibraryReads deadline: Nov. 20) were plentiful and response has already been enthusiastic with some reporting the book bears being read twice in order to catch missed clues.  Jenna Friebel from Oak Park Public Library (IL) exclaimed, “Just one big twist after the other– impossible to put down. I loved that this is set up to seem like a clichéd jealous ex-wife novel but then turns out to be so much different.”

John Green, New Novel

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Turtles All the Way Down is the title of John Green’s next YA novel, (PRH/Dutton Books for Young Readers; 9780525555360; cover not finalized) releasing on October 10. It is his first novel in six years, following 2012’s The Fault in Our Stars.

Entertainment Weekly reports it is “the story of 16-year-old Aza Holmes, a young woman who grapples with mental illness while investigating the disappearance of a fugitive billionaire.”

Green says “This is my first attempt to write directly about the kind of mental illness that has affected my life since childhood, so while the story is fictional, it is also quite personal.”

He announced the book on Twitter in a very brief notice.

The title refers to a story which Stephen Hawking relates in A Brief History of Time. Faced with the theory that the world is flat, held on the back of a turtle, a famous astronomer asks what the turtle stands on. The answer reveals the illogic of the theory, “But it’s turtles all the way down!”

It’s just one of many metaphors readers can expect, according to the Penguin’s UK site, quoting Green, “The great thing about figurative language and symbols and the like in novels is that you don’t have to be conscious of them for them to work.”

UPDATE: Green talks about the book in a bonus Vlogbrothers video, below. He invites viewers to post questions about it and promises to try to answer them on his next video, scheduled for Tuesday, June 27.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE, First Trailer

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

9781250121462_c1182The first trailer for Dreamworks’ adaptation of David Finkel’s 2013 award-winning Thank You For Your Service has been released.

Oscar-nominated Jason Hall (for Best Adapted Screenplay, American Sniper) wrote the script and makes his directorial debut. Miles Teller (War Dogs) leads the large cast which also includes Haley Bennett (The Girl on the Train) and Amy Schumer (Trainwreck) in what is billed as her first non-comedic role.

The film opens in theaters on October 27, 2017. As Variety reports, the release date is timed for awards season.

The book follows a group of soldiers as they try to adjust to civilian life after returning home from fighting in Baghdad, although the movie appears to focus on just one of them. A critical success, it was reviewed by the NYT, Washington Post, NPR, and The Guardian, shortlisted for a National Book Critics Circle Award and selected as a NYT‘s Notable Books of 2013.

tie-in edition (Macmillan/Picador; Macmillan Audio) arrives in September.

AMERICAN ASSASSIN, Trailer

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

The first full-length trailer for the movie based on Vince Flynn’s American Assassin has been released. Deadline reports that this may be the launch of a new “action hero franchise … built on a deep well of bestselling novels by the late Vince Flynn … in a revenge tale that could be the start of a Jack Ryan-like journey for [Dylan] O’Brien’s Mitch Rapp character.”

Also starring Michael Keaton, the film opens on Sept. 15

American Assassin is the eleventh title in the book series, chosen because it moves back in time to depict Rapp’s first assignment. Tie-ins will be released in August.
American Assassin: A Thriller
Vince Flynn
S&S/Atria; August 15, 2017
Trade Paperback
Mass Market
S&S Audio

FERDINAND Gets a New Trailer

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017

The second  trailer for the Blue Sky adaptation of Munro Leaf ‘s 1936 classic The Story of Ferdinand has been released. The film opens on December 15.

WWE star and actor John Cena is the voice of Ferdinand. Also featured are SNL‘s Kate McKinnon, as well as Gina Rodriguez (Jane the Virgin), Daveed Diggs (Hamilton) and Bobby Cannavale.

9780670674244The book is still in print in hardcover and paperback (Penguin Young Readers/Puffin) and is being released as a board book in August.

 

Grisham on CBS This Morning

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

On the day of the release of his latest novel, Camino Island (PRH/Doubleday; RH Large Print; RH and BOT Audio). John Grisham appeared on CBS This Morning to discuss his first “beach book.” Much is being made about Grisham departing from his usual style, but the departure is relatively small, described as a “mystery without lawyers.”

Grisham also discussed his “Do’s and Don’ts For Writing Popular Fiction,” published last week by the New York Times.

Grisham also has a new title coming in October. Reassuring fans that it will mark a return to his usual style, it’s titled at this point simply New Legal Thriller.

To TV: Alex Rider

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

Anthony Horowitz’s bestselling Alex Rider novels, featuring a teenage spy recruited by MI6, are a step closer to becoming a TV series, reports Deadline Hollywood.

The UK indie studio Eleventh Hour Films is working with ITV to develop a “large-scale family series.” Deadline reports that the plan is to develop a “long-running series that’s re-imagined as an older-skewing family event drama. The adaptation will look to open the adult storylines to deliver a character-driven series that pushes the boundaries of the genre.”

Each book in the series will be treated in one season, starting with the second book, 2001’s Point Blank. The first book, Stormbreaker, has already been made into a film.

The 11th book in the series will be published in the US on Oct. 10, 2017, Never Say Die (PRH/Philomel Books).

No casting news or premiere date have been released.

RBG Gets Ripped

Monday, June 5th, 2017

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s workout is becoming a book, The RBG Workout: How She Stays Strong . . . and You Can Too! by Bryant Johnson (RBG’s trainer), illustrations by Patrick Welsh (HMH, Oct. 3).

Illustrations show RBG doing her exercises in her court robes and wearing purple leggings. The Associated Press reports “Johnson, an Army reservist whose day job is as a court clerk in Washington, has been training Ginsburg since 1999.” He now also trains Justices Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan.

Politico Magazine has a story on the workout and Johnson. Entertainment Weekly and Time both report the book news.

Justice Ginsburg is proving a popular subject. In addition to My Own Words, by Ruth Bader Ginsburg with Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams (S&S, 2016) and Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik (Harper/Dey Street Books, 2015), there are two children’s books, I Dissent by Debbie Levy, Elizabeth Baddeley (S&S Books for Young Readers, 2016) and the forthcoming Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The Case of R.B.G. vs. Inequality by Jonah Winter, with illustrations by Stacy Innerst (Abrams Books for Young Readers, Aug. 2017).

More MILK AND HONEY

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Rupi Kaur will publish a new book in October, reports USA Today. Publisher Andrews McMeel describes the as yet untitled book as “a collection of non-traditional and deeply personal poems and original illustrations, focusing on growth, love and healing, ancestry and honoring one’s roots, expatriation and rising up to find a home within yourself.”

Kaur self-published her debut collection, Milk and Honey (S&S Audio; OverDrive Sample), in 2014. It become a sensation and was picked up by Andrews McMeel in 2015.

It has been on the NYT Trade Fiction list for over a year, currently #3 (after three non-consecutive weeks at #1). It is a fixture among Amazon’s Top 100 (currently #8) and has been on USA Today’s list for 61 weeks, rising as high as #3. Every library we checked still has an active holds list.

On her website Kaur writes Milk and Honey is about “the experience of violence. abuse. love. loss. femininity … each chapter serves a different purpose. deals with a different pain. heals a different heartache.”

The Guardian ran a profile of the author in 2016. Below are videos of Kaur, in a TEDx talk and reading from her first book.

WONDER, Film Trailer

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Auggie gets a face in the just released first full trailer for the film adaptation of R.J. Palacio’s Wonder (RH/Knopf Young Readers, 2012; Brilliance Audio; OverDrive Sample).

Directed by Stephen Chbosky (The Perks of Being a Wallflower), the film stars Jacob Tremblay (Room) as Auggie, a young boy with a facial deformity who enters a new school. Julia Roberts plays his mom, Owen Wilson, his dad, and Daveed Diggs (Hamilton), his classroom teacher.

The novel has spent 92 weeks on the NYT Children’s Middle Grade Hardcover list, where it is currently #2.

A tie-in comes out November 7, 2017, Wonder Movie Tie-In Edition by R. J. Palacio (PRH/Knopf Books for Young Readers). The cover is not yet finalized.

The film premieres November 17.

ARTEMIS Follows THE MARTIAN

Tuesday, May 9th, 2017

The announcement of the publication date of the new book by the author of The Martian, Andy Weir, set SF sites ablaze and the book rising on Amazon’s sales rankings.

Unsurprisingly, given the success of the adaptation of the author’s previous book, film rights have been acquired by the same team that produced that blockbuster adaptation.

Described as a “crime novel set on the moon,” the book is listed on wholesaler catalogs.

9780553448122_dacc7Artemis: A Novel
Andy Weir
PRH/Crown, November 14, 2017
Hardcover, 384 pages
$27.00 USD, $36.00 CAD
ISBN 9780553448122, 0553448129

AMERICAN ASSASSIN, Trailer

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

American AssassinThe first trailer for the film adaptation of Vince Flynn’s thriller American Assassin carries some extra interest. It’s the first on-screen appearance of Dylan O’Brien since he suffered injuries while filming another adaptation, The Maze Runner: Death Cure. He plays the lead character, CIA operative Mitch Rapp. Michael Keaton plays the man assigned to train him as a killer.

The film is set for release on Sept. 15.

American Assassin is the eleventh title in the series, chosen because it moves back in time to depict Rapp’s first assignment. A tie-in has yet to be announced. The paperback (S&S/Pocket) experienced a bump on Amazon’s sales rankings as a result of the trailer’s release.

Outlander Season 3, First Look

Monday, April 17th, 2017

Droughtlander is slowly coming to an end. Set to debut in September, STARZ aired a teaser for season 3 during this weekend’s premiere of The White Princess.

Fans of the fashions in season two will have more to look forward to reports Vanity Fair, quoting lead actress Caitriona Balfe who says, “Some of the 60s pieces are so cool and beautiful that I asked [the costume designer] to make me doubles.”

The actors playing Jamie and Claire were separated in the actual filming as they are in the novel. Sam Heughan, who plays Jamie, tells the magazine that the experience was like “having a death in the family. Well, I don’t know. I mean, it’s just like a different show. It’s hard to separate yourself from the character. It’s always hard when we’re apart … But I think it all adds to the reunion—if there’s a reunion, or when there’s a reunion—well, you know there’s one in the books. It should be very special.” Balfe responded, “Och! He’s already killed me in his mind. Gone. Too sad.”

The third season of Outlander is based on Voyager, the third book in Diana Gabaldon’s long running series.

A tie-in edition arrives in August, Voyager (Starz Tie-in Edition), Diana Gabaldon (PRH/Bantam).