Archive for the ‘Fiction’ Category

Reading Ahead with GalleyChat

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018

Last week, GalleyChatting librarians tipped their favorite upcoming titles during the #ewgc chat. Scroll through the tweets to sit in on a great RA discussion. Speaking of great RA conversations, GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower has started a blog. Her newest post, “Sandy Covers,” highlights her favorite new Beach Reads, and, for upcoming titles, also gives “while you wait” suggestions.

All 192 of the GalleyChat titles are listed in the following:

 Edelweiss catalog here, includes links to downloadable DRC’s.

GalleyChat Titles, June 2018— Downloadable spreadsheet, for ordering purposes. We didn’t include the tweets this time. If you want to know more about a particular title, search it along with #ewgc on Twitter.

The next LibraryReads voting deadline, for titles to be published in August, is a week from tomorrow, Wednesday, June 20th. Check the GalleyChat list for potential nominations as well as our EarlyWord “Diverse Titles for LibraryReads Consideration,

Join us for the next GalleyChat on Tues., July 10, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails) and don’t forget YA/MG GalleyChat this coming Thurs., June 14th, 2:30 to 3:30. Details on each here. Bring a friend!

Notes from June’s GalleyChat:

— Patterson and Clinton may be getting attention for The President Is Missing, but GalleyChatters say you should keep your eye out for Hope Never Dies: An Obama Biden Mystery by Andrew Shaffer, coming in July from the well-named publishing house, Quirk Books.

— GalleyChatters are stalking advance readers copies of the recently announced new Liane Moriarty title, Nine Perfect Strangers, to be published in November. No news yet on when ARC’s will be availble, but the following much-stalked titles appeared recently:

Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen, An Anonymous Girl 

Kate Atkinson, Transcription

Louise Penny, Kingdom of the Blind

— Excitement continues for The Silent Patient by screenwriter Alex Michaelides. It’s being compared to a previous GalleyChat favorite, Woman In The Window, and, like that book, this debut is building buzz months ahead of its February pub. date. GalleyChatters are already casting the movie and, given the author’s film industry connections, it would not be surprising if it goes that route. The DRC is on NetGalley.

— Another debut that has been getting GalleyChat attention for months is Vox by Christina Dalcher, coming in August. Gregg Winsor tweeted his Book Expo Shout ‘n’ Share recommendation, “A near-future dystopia where women are limited to speaking just 100 words. The comparisons to THE HANDSMAID’S TALE are very much accurate and – pardon the pun – this will give your book club tons to talk about.”

The book’s author, Christina Dalcher joined the chat to make her own recommendation, saying she “just devoured Elliot Ackerman’s Waiting for Eden, after meeting him at the PRH breakfast. Can’t stop thinking about this one.” That comment was echoed by other Chatters.

— Several August titles from our EarlyWord “Diverse Titles for LibraryReads Consideration,” received GalleyChat recs (LibraryReads voting deadline, June 20).

      

Before She Sleeps, Bina Shah — Add this to the list of titles being compared to The Handmaid’s Tale, a growing category dubbed by “womb dystopia” by some. GalleyChatter Susan Maguire tweeted. “… just in case anyone has patrons who liked THE HANDMAID’S TALE, there’s BEFORE SHE SLEEPS by Bina Shah that is the feminist dystopia we don’t deserve, but it is also the feminist dystopia we are going to get.” “PW calls it a “haunting dystopian thriller from Pakistani author Shah”

Temper, Nicky Drayden — Jenna Friebel, “Do y’all remember how much I raved about her debut, The Prey of Gods? This one is just as inventive.”

A River of Stars, Vanessa Hua — GalleyChat, “about a Chinese woman who makes her way to California to give her baby U.S. citizenship, blurbed by Celeste Ng” — “Vanessa Hua’s debut is an utterly absorbing novel.” — LJ PrePub Alert, “A columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle and author of the glowingly reviewed small-press debut collection DECEIT AND OTHER POSSIBILITIES, Hua claims multiple awards …”

Hollywood Ending, Kellye Garrett, DRC available on Netgalley — GalleyChat, “Dayna Anderson uses her connections as a former actress to solve a murder in HOLLYWOOD ENDING by @kellyekell. Smart, sassy mystery that keeps you guessing to the end”. — “This series is so fun! A great take on the LA noir tone.” — It’s the second in a mystery series featuring an African/American female detective. The first, Hollywood Homicide just won an Anthony and a Lefty

Amy Adams Is THE WOMAN
IN THE WINDOW

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

The news media is all over the announcement that Amy Adams will star in the film version of A.J. Finn’s best seller, The Woman in the Window (HarperCollins/Morrow, 2018). The book spent four weeks at #1 on the NYT Best Seller list, remaining in the top 5 for seven more weeks. It is curently at #9.

British director Joe Wright will head the movie. He won multiple Oscars last year, including Best Picture, for his film about Churchill’s early days as Britain’s prime minister, The Darkest Hour. Wright has had experience with book adaptations, having had success with Atonement, Pride & Prejudice and Anna Karenina. His adaptation of JM Barrie’s Pan, however, was a critical and box office flop.

Wright is also signed to direct a movie based on John Williams’s 1965 cult favoriteStoner, (NY Review of Books) starring Casey Affleck and Tommy Lee Jones. According to reports, that film is moving toward production, so it could be at least a year before work begins on Woman.

Adams will soon be seen in another hotly anticipated thriller adaption, the HBO series based on Gillian Flynn’s debut novel, Sharp Objects (PRH/ Shaye Areheart, 2006), expected for release in July.

Tie-ins for it will be released on June.

For news on other upcoming adaptations, link to our spreadsheet, Adaptations – upcoming and In Development

For tie-ins, check our Movies & TV Based on Books collection.

Browse our links to trailers of scheduled movies and TV at the right.

Man Booker Shortlist, 2017

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

The shortlist for one of the most influential literary awards in the English language, the 2017 Man Booker Prize, was announced in London today. Surprisingly, the novel that has won the most awards to date, including the Pulitzer Prize, Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, did not make it to the shortlist. Several other big names also did not make the cut, Arundhati Roy, Sebastian Barry, and Zadie Smith.The Guardian declares the list “daring,” featuring novels that “reject conventional realism and celebrate precarious and unstable narratives,”

Half of the six titles are by authors from the U.S., as the New York Times notes in its headline.

The winner will be announced on Oct. 17.

4 3 2 1,  Paul Auster, January 31, 2017, Macmillan/Henry Holt and Co.; Trade pbk, Picador, February 6, 2018 — U.S.

History of Wolves, Emily Fridlund, January 3, 2017, Atlantic Monthly Press; Trade pbk, Grove Press, November 7, 2017 — U.S, debut author

Exit West, Mohsin Hamid, Riverhead Books, March 7, 2017; Trade pbk, March 6, 2018 — UK/Pakistan

Elmet, Fiona Mozley, No US publisher announced yet. UK publisher is Hodder & Stoughton — UK. A first novel, this one is considered a wild card. UPDATE: it is now set to be published by Workman/Algonquin, December 5, 2017, ship Date: November 8, 2017) and to be released in audio by HighBridge Audio.

Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders, February 14, 2017, Random House; Random House Trade Paperback, February 6, 2018 — U.S.

Autumn, Ali Smith, February 7, 2017, PRH/Pantheon; Trade pbk, PRH/Anchor, October 31, 2017 — Scotland

Meet A.J. Finn, the Author of
THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

 

For several months, GalleyChatters have been talking about A.J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018), predicting it will be the hot debut of 2018.

Below, we chat with the author.

       

Meet Stephanie Powell Watts,
ALA Book Club’s Inaugural Pick

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

Cuyahoga Public Library hosted  Stephanie Powell Watts in a Facebook Live chat on Wednesday. If you missed it, you can watch the video here (be sure to follow Cuyahoga County Public Library on Facebook first).

More on the book and author, below:

Reviews (rated an overall RAVE from BookMarks)

NPR interview with the author

Women Authors Rule Hugo Awards

Friday, August 11th, 2017

The best novel winner and nominees for the Hugo Award, announced today, below:

Winner — The Obelisk Gate, N. K. Jemisin, (Hachette/Orbit) — this is the second Hugo in a row for the author. She won for The Fifth Season (Hachette/Orbit) last year. They are the first two titles in a trilogy. The final, The Stone Sky, is set for release next week.

All the Birds in the Sky, Charlie Jane Anders, (Macmillan/Tor) — this won the Nebula this year

A Closed and Common Orbit, Becky Chambers, (HarperVoyager)

Death’s End, Cixin Liu, (Macmillan/Tor) — the author won the Hugo in 2015

Ninefox Gambit, Yoon Ha Lee, (S&S/Solaris)

Too Like the Lightning, Ada Palmer, (Macmillan/Tor)

Winners and nominees in all the other categories, here.

THE WINDFALL: Getting Attention

Sunday, July 2nd, 2017

Diksha Basu’s debut novel, The Windfall (PRH/Crown; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample) is attracting notable attention.

TV rights were optioned in March, reports Deadline Hollywood and now that it is has been published, the NYT covers the author twice. Taking a break from her nonfiction duties, NYT reviewer Jennifer Senior writes the novel tells “a story that’s the stuff of Amartya Sen’s worst nightmares and Tom Wolfe’s sweetest dreams.” The paper also has a feature on the Basu’s “Sunday Routine.

As part of its “Culture Index” RollingStone says it is one of the “Seven things you should check out this week.” HuffPost lists it as one of “12 Great New Books To Bring To The Beach This Summer” while Bustle names it one of “15 Uplifting Books That Will Soothe Your Soul In Dark Times.” Elle reviews, writing “The Windfall explores the effects of generational, gender, and class differences. Through her detailed descriptions of family meals, dusty floors, and ostentatious outfits, Basu gives us a full snapshot of a community’s life in contemporary India.”

PW stars, calling it a “charming, funny debut.” It is a July Indie Next pick.

NPR interviews the author on Weekend Edition Sunday, calling her novel “a delightful comedy of errors where [the characters] navigate the unexpected pressures and pleasures of newfound wealth in modern India.”

Pearl Power, Summer Reads

Friday, June 30th, 2017

“Librarian’s librarian” Nancy Pearl gives a boost to several titles on NPR’s Morning Edition this week, picking her favorite books from the spring list for summer reading.

Host Steve Inskeep begins by asking if the prolific reader is have any trouble focusing on books “in these news saturated times.” Pearl admits that she she finds her reading tastes are changing and she has abandoned her usual favorites, character-driven stories for page-turners

Her favorite is the debut, August Snow, (Soho Crime; Recorded Books). She says, “I’m not just saying that because I’m from Detroit and it’s set in Detroit.”

Prepub reviews dunned the book for veering into thriller cliches, but Kirkus noted, “it’s easy to overlook those flaws considering what this book gets right: a hugely likable hero who uses his wealth to bring his neighborhood back to life; a feel for the vitality and pride in run-down urban neighborhoods as good as George Pelecanos on Washington, D.C.; appealing supporting characters who give life to the book’s theme of the solace to be found in communities. It adds up to a very pleasurable read.”

By the end of the program, Inskeep observes, “we started out trying to get away from the news, but we’re actually getting fresh perspectives on the news of recent years … from urban struggle to rural areas that are losing population and economic vitality.”

Click here for the full list of titles and annotations.

Readers Are With THE FORCE

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Don Winslow debuts on the NYT Hardcover Fiction list at #10 with The Force (HarperCollins/Morrow; Blackstone Audio; OverDrive Audio Sample), the highest any of his three novels have ever reached.

The book gets its lift from a great deal of press, including a review in the NYT by Janet Maslin who calls it a “shattering New York cop epic about an elite task force leader who’s a hero until he’s not.” It is also featured in the NYTBR Crime column, with long time reviewer Marilyn Stasio calling it “a scorcher.” In a third round of NYT attention, Winslow is the subject of the “By the Book” column this week. The Washington Post says it is “a big, fat book of fast-moving fiction … riveting and scary.” Adding to the buzz, film rights sold before the book even had a title. UPDATE: The movie release has just been set for March 1, 2019. David Mamet has been hired to write the script and James Mangold (Logan) to direct.

Winslow has also made news this week with an ad in the NYT that is an open letter blasting “President Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions for wanting to ‘drag us back into one of the most catastrophic social policies in this nation’s history: #TheWaronDrugs'” writes USA Today. He tells USA Today that he placed the ad at his own expense because “I feel so strongly that this (drug) policy is wrong. … (It) seeks to expand a disastrous policy that has ripped our nation apart.”

Holds across libraries we checked are reflecting the attention; many systems have ratios topping 5:1.

Pennie Picks KISS CARLO

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Costco’s influential book buyer Pennie Clark Ianniciello, selects as her July “Buyers Pick” Kiss Carlo by Adriana Trigiani (HarperCollins/Harper; HarperLuxe; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample), a love story and family tale set in the world of the theater.

Ianniciello gives it her personal endorsement, writing “I look forward to every new book by Adriana Trigiani … her books are a joy to read.”

In an interview in the Costco Connection, Trigiani says “The plot sets the stage for a Shakespearean conflict, for it’s a story of love, loyalty and creativity that is filled with everything we all struggle with as humans.”

It lands on the NYT Hardcover Fiction list #7, her highest-ranking debut to date.

Trigiani is featured on Today in a segment headlined “Need a juicy summer read?” Chatting with Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb over a breakfast of pasta and red wine, she claims this book is her “favorite of everything I’ve written.”

High Tide for BEACH HOUSE FOR RENT

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Mary Alice Monroe hits a career high with Beach House for Rent (S&S/Gallery Books; S&S Audio; OverDrive Sample), debuting on the NYT Hardcover Fiction list at #12 [UPDATE: The “eco-minded” author is featured in the NYT‘s “Inside the List” column].

Beach House for Rent is book four in the Isle of Palms series begun in 2002. Each of the four books are spaced roughly five years apart: The Beach House (2002), Swimming Lessons (2007), Beach House Memories (2012), Beach House for Rent (2017). In their starred review LJ writes this newest can stand alone.

The series has been on the path to an adaptation for the Hallmark channel, announced in 2015.  Star Andie McDowell confirmed that via a video, but there has been no news since on the status. The rerelease of the first book in the series last December may indicate there is movement.

To TV: VANITY FAIR

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

A new adaptation of Thackeray’s Vanity Fair is heading to TV, streaming on Amazon and airing on Britain’s ITV reports Variety.

It will star Olivia Cooke (Ready Player One) as the wily Becky Sharp, a woman trying to rise through society against the backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars. James Strong (Broadchurch) directs.

The novel, a classic of British literature, has been adapted many times, on TV and in the movies. Most recently, in the form of a film staring Reese Witherspoon an directed by Mira Nair, It was “a box-office disappointment” according to Variety. This new production hopes to revive interest. An ITV executive said the seven episode series will “bring the novel to life in a way that will really connect with a modern audience.”

The series is being produced by Amazon Studios and Mammoth Screen. Mammoth, an arm of ITV, produced the popular Victoria series which played on PBS in the United States. ITV is most famous in the US for creating Downton Abbey.

The historical drama is expected to debut in 2018. The book has been published in a number of editions and is also available as a full-cast audio featuring narrators Emma Fielding and Stephen Fry (BBC Books).

The Telegraph offers a primer on the story and the importance of the novel.

Books In The City

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

Sarah Jessica Parker has picked the first novel for her new imprint SJP for Hogarth, a debut by Fatima Farheen Mirza tentatively titled A Place for Us.

According to the NYT it “follows an Indian-American family that is reunited on the eve of the eldest daughter, Hadia’s, wedding. It tackles issues of belonging and tradition, delving into the complex experience of an immigrant family in the United States.”

In a press release Mirza said “After working on the novel for eight years, I could not be happier with the home it has found … I’m confident in their vision for the novel and grateful that it will be brought into the world by SJP for Hogarth.”

Vogue writes that Parker “called being ‘taken hostage by Fatima Mirza’s heartrending and timely story’ a ‘gutting pleasure,’ and praised Mirza’s ability to afford her reader a better understanding of ‘what it means to reconcile one’s love of family and culture with a desire to find one’s own path, and one’s own faith.'”

The novel will publish in 2019. Parker will be involved in all aspects of the book’s publication and design and tells the NYT she’s a bit nervous about the editing process, fearing that “a writer might be ‘allergic’ to her feedback.”

It’s been quite  the literary week for Parker. On Monday she announced her pick for ALA’s new BookClub Central. Parker serves as honorary chair of the initiative.

FOUNDATION To TV

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

Isaac Asimov’s science fiction Foundation Trilogy may be headed to TV reports Deadline Hollywood. Skydance Television, the production company behind the new Star Trek films and World War Z, is helming a possible project.

This is not the first attempt to translate the books to screen. Den of Geek writes that as recently as 2014 HBO took a crack at it and Deadline adds “the guys who greenlit The Lord Of The Rings films [as well as] Independence Day director Roland Emmerich” have tried as well.

This time the team includes showrunners and screenwriters who have worked on the Dark Knight trilogy and Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles.

According to Deadline the main reasons no one has been able to adapt the series yet is their sprawling nature, involving many characters and plots and because George Lucas drew on them so heavily for Star Wars “the challenge is to not appear to be ripping off one of Hollywood’s most successful film franchises, even though Asimov wrote his books 75 years ago.”

The Foundation Trilogyan iconic piece of science fiction, won the 1966 Hugo Award for Best All-Time Series, beating out Lord of the Rings, even though, as io9 reports, many thought the category was invented specifically to honor that title.

io9 posted a guide to the books back when they thought HBO would make the series. Their primer is still useful for anyone who needs to get up to speed on the story. Both trade paperback and mass market editions are still in print (PRH/Spectra).

More Martin

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

In addition to the GOT spinoffs, another George R.R. Martin adaptation is in the works. The Syfy channel just greenlighted a pilot based on his supernatural 1980 novella Nightflyers.

A team is “setting up a writers room to generate backup scripts in preparation for a potential series pickup,” reports Deadline Hollywood. The pilot script is being written by Jeff Buhler, known for the horror films The Midnight Meat Train and the upcoming remake of Jacob’s Ladder.

Variety describes the story as following “eight maverick scientists and a powerful telepath who embark on an expedition to the edge of our solar system in the hopes of contacting alien life. They travel aboard The Nightflyer – a ship with a small tightknit crew and a reclusive captain. But when terrifying and violent events begin to take place they start to question each other, and surviving the journey proves harder than anyone thought.”

The Nerdist adds “After all, if the night is dark and full of terrors, just imagine what untold horrors lie in the inky blackness of space.”

On his blog, Martin says it is “one of my SF/ horror hybrids … a favorite of mine (especially the longer version that I did for BINARY STARS), and I think the show could have a lot of potential… especially if you like a little horror in your SF.”

The novella was adapted into what Den of Geek calls “a schlocky, limited-releasefilm in 1987. The novella itself is collected in Martin’s 1985 Nightflyers, now out of print.

Martin, who has an exclusive contract with HBO, is not involved with this new project.