Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Penguin Young Readers Live Chat

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

Below is the most recent chat from the Penguin Young Readers Author Program. To become a member of the program, sign up here.

 Live Chat with Piers Torday, THE LAST WILD(05/21/2014) 
4:38
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We will begin our live online chat with Piers Torday, author of THE LAST WILD in about 15 minutes.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 4:38 Nora - EarlyWord
4:39
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Meanwhile, here’s the cover of the book…
Wednesday May 21, 2014 4:39 Nora - EarlyWord
4:39
Nora - EarlyWord
THE LAST WILD, Cover
Wednesday May 21, 2014 4:39 
4:42
Nora - EarlyWord: 
It's received many admiring reviews. Booklist gives a good summary -- "In a world where there are no more animals (only a few rogue varmints ), Kester Jaynes finds himself in an unusual position: a cockroach is asking him for help. Kester, who hasn't spoken since his mother died, answers the entreaty of the cockroach (and some persuasive pigeons) and escapes to the forbidden wild, where a few animals have been hiding ... an enchanted adventure with a message of empowerment and hope that ought to sweep readers along to the planned second volume."
Wednesday May 21, 2014 4:42 Nora - EarlyWord
4:56
Nora - EarlyWord: 
It’s great to see our chat participants gathering. You can send your questions through at any time. They'll go into a queue, and Lisa will submit as many of them as we can to Piers before the end of the chat. Don’t worry about typos – and please forgive any that we commit!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 4:56 Nora - EarlyWord
5:02
lisa von drasek: 
tech difficulties!!! here I am!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:02 lisa von drasek
5:04
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Hurrah! Welcome Lisa!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:04 Nora - EarlyWord
5:04
Nora - EarlyWord: 
The clock has struck the magic hour. I see that Piers is here from the U.K. -- say hi to everyone, Piers!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:04 Nora - EarlyWord
5:04
Piers Torday: 
Hi everybody! Great to be here
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:04 Piers Torday
5:04
lisa von drasek: 
Hello Piers!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:04 lisa von drasek
5:04
Piers Torday: 
Hi Lisa!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:04 Piers Torday
5:05
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I see some others out there -- say hi to Piers!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:05 Nora - EarlyWord
5:06
Piers Torday: 
Please feel free to ask me anything
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:06 Piers Torday
5:06
[Comment From MD LibrarianMD Librarian: ] 
Looking forward to getting WILD, today, Piers!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:06 MD Librarian
5:06
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
::waves:: Hi, all three of you.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:06 sdn
5:06
lisa von drasek: 
Piers, can you say a few words about the response that middle graders have been having to The Last Wild?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:06 lisa von drasek
5:06
Piers Torday: 
Great MD Librarian - hope you enjoy - and hi sdn!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:06 Piers Torday
5:07
lisa von drasek: 
sdn- would that be Sharyn November Piers' editor?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:07 lisa von drasek
5:07
Piers Torday: 
Lisa I've had the most phenomenal response from middle graders - beyond what I expected. I think I had forgotten how powerful animal stories can be for younger children
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:07 Piers Torday
5:08
lisa von drasek: 
... what do kids like best about the book?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:08 lisa von drasek
5:08
[Comment From Michy FishMichy Fish: ] 
Greetings from the wilds of Michigan!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:08 Michy Fish
5:09
lisa von drasek: 

Although this book is dystopian, there is an undercurrent of humor.... especially the Wild...I love the white pigeon and the wolf pup
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:09 lisa von drasek
5:09
Piers Torday: 
I think they find the beginning - which we find quite bleak as adults - very exciting and then are thrilled when some humble cockroaches and pigeons break our hero out of his horrible prison. And they really respond to the humour in the characterisation of the animals, absolutely
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:09 Piers Torday
5:09
[Comment From PDLibFanPDLibFan: ] 
Not surprising that this was a big hit at the Texas Library Association convention last month!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:09 PDLibFan
5:09
Piers Torday: 
Hello Michigan and thanks PDLIbfan, that's great to hear!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:09 Piers Torday
5:09
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
(It would indeed be Sharyn November, Piers's editor!)
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:09 sdn
5:09
lisa von drasek: 
We got this advance question from one of the program members:

How did you choose the animal that would save the little boy?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:09 lisa von drasek
5:10
Piers Torday: 
The one and only SDN!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:10 Piers Torday
5:10
Piers Torday: 
Great question Lisa. I chose animals that I felt were neglected and taken for granted by us - the cockroach and the pigeon. Because I wanted animals that any child who has felt that way could identify with and also make a point about biodiversity.

In the 19th century the passenger pigeon was the most prolific bird in the US. Their flocks went up to 3.5 billion in size and when they flew the sky went black. But following the commercialization of pigeon meat and massive deforestation, by 1914 there was only one left alive and she died in captivity.

Not many of us like cockroaches but they are nature’s garbage collectors and recyclers – the world wouldn’t function without them.

So I guess I'm saying - you can't take things for granted!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:10 Piers Torday
5:11
lisa von drasek: 
Sharyn, I noticed in my reading that you and Piers left "British" English alone. can you comment on that?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:11 lisa von drasek
5:13
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
Sure! Whenever possible, I prefer to keep the original flavor of a book when it comes to language usage and spelling -- it makes for full-story immersion, if you will.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:13 sdn
5:13
Piers Torday: 
As Sharyn has said, she had no desire to Americanise more than necessary, which I really appreciated - but this wasn’t just her choice, it was borne out by all the responses from her test readers.

And as a result I think if anything the story is how many English words young American readers weren’t troubled by. I was allowed to keep ‘torches’ rather than change to ‘flashlights’ , ‘rubbish’ rather than ‘garbage’ or ‘trash’, and so on.

Not only that, there were a number of words that some young English readers might not get which their US counterparts had no problem with -like ‘bally’ - meaning ‘bloody' and ‘chuffed’ - meaning ‘delighted’.

Of course, I did have to make some changes. As Sharyn says, ‘Trackies’ (sweatpants) and ‘Trainers’ (sneakers) just make no sense at all over in the States, so they had to go.

A few others:

We ‘click’ our fingers to make a point, American readers ‘snap’ theirs, so I changed that.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:13 Piers Torday
5:14
lisa von drasek: 
what is the difference between a rabbit and a hare?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:14 lisa von drasek
5:14
Piers Torday: 
Lisa the difference between a rabbit and a hare is chiefly in the ears. The hare has longer ears and longer legs, which mean they can run much faster. The hare sleeps above ground, unlike rabbits in their burrows. Rabbits tend to breed like, well, rabbits – which hares don’t.

A hare being pursued or “harried” by a dog (hence their name) can make an awful cry which sounds like a baby in distress, which rabbits can’t do.

Hares can make tremendous pets, being very happy on duvets and armchairs, rather like cats.

And… they box, which rabbits don't!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:14 Piers Torday
5:15
lisa von drasek: 
You're pulling my leg! Like a Kangaroo?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:15 lisa von drasek
5:15
Piers Torday: 
Absolutely - do you want to see a photo?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:15 Piers Torday
5:15
lisa von drasek: 
yes, please!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:15 lisa von drasek
5:16
Piers Torday
Boxing hares
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:16 
5:16
lisa von drasek: 
wow!

Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:16 lisa von drasek
5:16
Piers Torday: 
They do this every March... Hence the rather prickly “March Hare" in Alice in Wonderland
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:16 Piers Torday
5:17
lisa von drasek: 
I read that Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is one of your favorite books to recommend. Did I hear that you met Roald Dahl?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:17 lisa von drasek
5:17
Piers Torday: 
I did meet the great man, Lisa. When I was growing up my mother ran a children's bookshop, and she invited Roald Dahl to speak at a book week event...
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:17 Piers Torday
5:18
Piers Torday: 
...And a few days later a mysterious brown envelope arrived addressed to me and my mum. Do you want to see what was inside?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:18 Piers Torday
5:18
lisa von drasek: 
yes, please.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:18 lisa von drasek
5:19
[Comment From Michy FishMichy Fish: ] 
Wonder why rabbits don't do that?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:19 Michy Fish
5:19
[Comment From Boston Lib.Boston Lib.: ] 
Piers -- did you draw your avatar?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:19 Boston Lib.
5:19
Piers Torday: 
Michy Fish - I don't know - think they're happy to let the hares go for it!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:19 Piers Torday
5:19
Piers Torday
Miranda Mary Piker
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:19 
5:20
Piers Torday: 
This is the note I got from Roald Dahl when I was little - an Oompa Loompa Song he cut from the first draft of Charlie - about the character Miranda Mary Piker, also cut, because his daughter didnt like her
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:20 Piers Torday
5:20
lisa von drasek: 
OMG! you really know your way to a curator's heart
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:20 lisa von drasek
5:20
Piers Torday: 
I keep it as a reminder that even the very greatest writers make big mistakes
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:20 Piers Torday
5:20
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
I have never seen that in color, I don't think. WOW.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:20 sdn
5:21
Piers Torday: 
Hi Boston Lib - yes, I did!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:21 Piers Torday
5:21
lisa von drasek: 
Do you save all your drafts? Do you show them to kids?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:21 lisa von drasek
5:21
lisa von drasek: 
when you were writing did you have pictures of all the animals at your desk?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:21 lisa von drasek
5:21
[Comment From HCLibrarianHCLibrarian: ] 
I wondered if Roald Dahl was an influence. I was reminded of Dahl quite a bit when I read The Last Wild--in very good ways.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:21 HCLibrarian
5:22
Piers Torday: 
Lisa I save all my drafts - I don't show them to kids but when I do talk to kids I really try and get them to enjoy the process of writing and not worry too much about getting perfect end results straightaway
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:22 Piers Torday
5:22
lisa von drasek: 
do you have a day job or are you a full time writer
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:22 lisa von drasek
 
Piers Torday: 
Lisa - I used to work in TV as a producer but now I divide my time between writing full time and speaking to children in schools and libraries.
  Piers Torday
5:22
Piers Torday: 
HCLibrarian - thank you, he was a massive influence hopefully not too much!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:22 Piers Torday
5:23
lisa von drasek: 
-- Can you talk about your writing process? Do you get up at 4:00 am to write?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:23 lisa von drasek
 
Piers Torday: 
cant write till after breakfast - about 9am, and I think and write till about 1pm, and then try and tidy up what I've done after lunch. It's quite haphazard. as long as I get my 750 words a day, I'm happy. But no work after 7pm!
  Piers Torday
5:23
Piers Torday: 
Hi Lisa Lisa no I didn't keep photos of the animals on my desk because I wanted to keep the characters in my head and not get too waylaid by the actual everyday animal.

But I did do a lot of library research to make sure that – other than talking – none of the animals did anything they wouldn’t or couldn’t do in real life. And I stored a lot of photos to make sure physical details were correct.

And…I did got to meet a real wolf. Want to see a picture of that?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:23 Piers Torday
5:24
lisa von drasek: 
yes , please
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:24 lisa von drasek
5:24
[Comment From Boston Lib.Boston Lib.: ] 
I'm fascinated by you're not wanting to be overly influenced by the actual animal -- can you elaborate on that?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:24 Boston Lib.
5:25
Piers Torday
Tala the 18-month wolf cub who inspired the one in the book
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:25 
5:26
lisa von drasek: 
wow. that cub is really big. I imagined it to be the size of a golden retriever puppy all bouncy and loose.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:26 lisa von drasek
5:27
Piers Torday: 
Boston Lib - what I mean is that although I want them to look and feel like real animals, there is a danger that when you look too much at photos of "real" animals there is nothing behind the eyes, and so when you are trying to use them in ways which draw on their symbolic, poetic, mythological - or simply comic - potential, too much reality can deaden it for me. I really care about them from an eco point of view in the real world, but in the study I need to see them more figuratively
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:27 Piers Torday
5:27
Piers Torday: 
Lisa - maybe this is the size Kester's wolf cub grows into!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:27 Piers Torday
5:27
lisa von drasek: 
-- I read that you were friends with Eva Ibbotson. Had you read Secret of Platform 13 before Harry Potter came out?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:27 lisa von drasek
5:27
[Comment From Boston Lib.Boston Lib.: ] 
Thanks for that -- makes sense.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:27 Boston Lib.
5:28
Piers Torday: 
Eva was my mum's greatest friend and she'd just started writing books when my mum opened her shop. She used to record them on cassette (remember those?) and send them to us for our thoughts. So yes we had read Platform 13 and were, ahem, as surprised as anyone when HP came out..
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:28 Piers Torday
5:28
[Comment From MG LibrarianMG Librarian: ] 
Sorry; I'm not familiar with Secret of Platform 13 -- is it like HP?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:28 MG Librarian
5:30
Piers Torday: 
MG - the big deal is the secret hidden platform at Kings Cross station in London in both books
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:30 Piers Torday
5:30
Piers Torday: 
But hey - I clearly borrow from lots of other writers.. I think these things are overplayed and so did Eva
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:30 Piers Torday
5:30
lisa von drasek: 
To me they were alike in that they were both really fabulous fantasies with a lot of humor, really bad guys and adventure and magic from authors that I wasn't familiar with. I read both of them aloud to 4th graders
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:30 lisa von drasek
5:30
Piers Torday: 
Exactly Lisa!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:30 Piers Torday
5:30
lisa von drasek: 
When I was book talking the Last Wild, I had trouble coming up with comparable titles. Sharyn...what did you tell the sales reps?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:30 lisa von drasek
5:31
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
I told them exactly what my first US reader -- Alice, who was 11 at the time -- said: "It's like sci-fi Roald Dahl!"
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:31 sdn
5:31
Piers Torday: 
Still my favourite blurb ever, sdn
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:31 Piers Torday
5:31
lisa von drasek: 
I love that! Can I use it?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:31 lisa von drasek
5:32
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
Oh, feel free! It's on the jacket.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:32 sdn
5:32
lisa von drasek: 
oh now you all know that I don't read book jackets!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:32 lisa von drasek
5:32
Piers Torday: 
It's a great book - the secret of platform 13... and everything Lisa said about is true
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:32 Piers Torday
5:33
lisa von drasek: 
Piers, speaking of villains -- I really really really hated Captain Skuldiss. I wanted to kill him with my own bare hands.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:33 lisa von drasek
5:33
Piers Torday: 
Lisa, sorry but thank you! Now he is inspired by The Child Catcher from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, only as an animal catcher
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:33 Piers Torday
5:34
lisa von drasek: 
Piers, I read that you had a pet monkey. picture please
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:34 lisa von drasek
5:34
Piers Torday: 
You mean Basil? Hang on, I just need to try and get him to sit still for a moment...
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:34 Piers Torday
5:34
Piers Torday
Basil, my pet monkey
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:34 
5:34
lisa von drasek: 
thank you.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:34 lisa von drasek
5:35
lisa von drasek: 
I loved Kester's scarf. Do you have a favorite piece of clothing that is also an object of comfort?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:35 lisa von drasek
5:37
Piers Torday: 
I'm not sure as much as him, but I was sent some great fan art of his scarf
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:37 Piers Torday
5:37
lisa von drasek: 
can I see it?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:37 lisa von drasek
5:37
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
(I want someone to knit you that scarf.)
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:37 sdn
5:38
lisa von drasek: 
Sharon, I will. are you okay with wool? Piers, I will need some measurements.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:38 lisa von drasek
5:39
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
I love you, Lisa Von Drasek.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:39 sdn
5:39
Piers Torday: 
Boston Lib - Monkeys are not only difficult pets, they are a nightmare and forever throwing coconuts at my neighbours head, not recommended
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:39 Piers Torday
5:39
lisa von drasek: 
Where in the world would you like to travel?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:39 lisa von drasek
5:39
Piers Torday
The scarf I would like SDN to get me knitted
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:39 
5:40
Piers Torday: 
Lisa I would like to travel to the Antarctic before it disappears
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:40 Piers Torday
5:42
lisa von drasek: 
Do you have plans to visit the united states?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:42 lisa von drasek
5:43
Piers Torday: 
I would love to come. I have so many friends over there from my time at school in USC, working in LA and New York, and now lots of new friends from the books, so perhaps once The Last Wild is out in soft cover and the Dark Wild is out in hard cover I can come and meet some of them!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:43 Piers Torday
5:44
Piers Torday: 
Lisa - you also asked about my working process, what time I get up and so on. I cant write till after breakfast - about 9am, and I think and write till about 1pm, and then try and tidy up what I've done after lunch. It's quite haphazard. as long as I get my 750 words a day, I'm happy. But no work after 7pm!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:44 Piers Torday
5:44
lisa von drasek: 
What are you reading now?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:44 lisa von drasek
5:45
Piers Torday: 
I am currently reading a million books - a book on the sea, a book on making my handwriting better, a book on extinction, a novel from the 1970's by Anita Brookner, a fabulous MG adventure called Ironheart and some very old Balzac tales. Oh and I just started a book called Grasshopper Jungle today as well.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:45 Piers Torday
5:45
lisa von drasek: 
I am dying to read the sequel The Dark Wild. When can I get my hands on it?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:45 lisa von drasek
5:45
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
(Viking will be publishing THE DARK WILD in Winter 2015 -- the season one year from now.)
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:45 sdn
5:46
Piers Torday: 
Can't wait!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:46 Piers Torday
5:46
Nora - EarlyWord
The U.K. cover of THE DARK WILD, the sequel to THE LAST WILD. To be published in the U.S., Winter, 2015
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:46 
5:47
lisa von drasek: 
Have you had any surprising reactions to your book?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:47 lisa von drasek
5:47
Piers Torday: 
A mysterious white dog, a needy rat and a bossy starling...
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:47 Piers Torday
5:47
lisa von drasek: 
no that is just mean...teasing us like that!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:47 lisa von drasek
5:47
Piers Torday: 
Lisa I’ve mainly had the most lovely reactions – so many emails and letters from children who it has really touched, and you can’t ask for better than that.

Some parents have said they were animal lovers and appalled by the fact it is about some animals dying...which is a little ironic as really it is about animals surviving and encouraging us to look after our fellow creatures a little better!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:47 Piers Torday
5:48
Piers Torday: 
Ok... and some mean foxes too!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:48 Piers Torday
5:49
lisa von drasek: 
Do you have more than one story going at once?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:49 lisa von drasek
5:49
Piers Torday: 
Lisa I have more than one story going in my head, sure, but not on the page. I’ve learned that focus really pays dividends. I do write around in a book though, I’m not always strictly chronological.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:49 Piers Torday
5:51
lisa von drasek: 
What did you eat for breakfast? Sharyn?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:51 lisa von drasek
5:52
Piers Torday: 
Today it was porridge which means tomorrow it will be boiled eggs!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:52 Piers Torday
5:52
lisa von drasek: 
what is porridge made of?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:52 lisa von drasek
5:52
Piers Torday: 
Rolled oats and water stirred over a gentle heat + milk/honey/fruit/whatever takes your fancy. Scottish!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:52 Piers Torday
5:53
lisa von drasek: 
Any last questions for Piers? I have one- do you ever Skype an author's visit?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:53 lisa von drasek
5:53
[Comment From Boston LibrarianBoston Librarian: ] 
Was just browsing your site -- very nice by the way -- and I see THE DARK WILD is already out in the UK! http://www.pierstorday.co.uk
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:53 Boston Librarian
5:53
Piers Torday: 
Hi Lisa - I have never Skyped an author's visit before but totally up for that
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:53 Piers Torday
5:53
lisa von drasek: 
Boston Librarian, Are you going to wait for the US edition or get a UK bootleg?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:53 lisa von drasek
5:54
lisa von drasek: 
tempting isn't it?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:54 lisa von drasek
5:54
Piers Torday: 
Boston Lib - thank you! Yes it is and I've had some lovely feedback, mainly -- Hurry up and finish the 3rd!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:54 Piers Torday
5:54
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
Hey, Lisa! NOT FAIR. ::grins::
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:54 sdn
5:55
lisa von drasek: 
oh right. please forgive me. sigh. Can you at least simultaneously publish number 3?
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:55 lisa von drasek
5:55
[Comment From Boston LibrarianBoston Librarian: ] 
I would try to get a bootleg edition, but don't know how!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:55 Boston Librarian
5:55
[Comment From sdnsdn: ] 
No, wait for the US version. Signed, US publisher and editor
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:55 sdn
5:56
[Comment From Boston LibrarianBoston Librarian: ] 
THANKS for that, Lisa!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:56 Boston Librarian
5:56
Piers Torday: 
Gladly Lisa if you can not only get me a scarf knitted but invent a time machine so I can finish it quicker!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:56 Piers Torday
5:56
Piers Torday: 
Boston Lib - I promise you will be the first to get the US signed TDW, right sdn?!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:56 Piers Torday
5:57
lisa von drasek: 
I will knit you AND Sharon scarves. just tell me the colors that you want.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:57 lisa von drasek
5:58
lisa von drasek: 
Thank you everyone for joining us.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:58 lisa von drasek
5:58
Piers Torday: 
Red and blue as in the book please!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:58 Piers Torday
5:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Thanks to you and Piers, Lisa -- this was really fun.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:58 Nora - EarlyWord
5:58
Piers Torday: 
Thanks for having me everybody and for all your support, this has been great
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:58 Piers Torday
5:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
And thanks to those of you who joined us today.
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:58 Nora - EarlyWord
5:59
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I want you to know that, offline, Lisa is finding out what kind of wool Piers peters!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:59 Nora - EarlyWord
5:59
Piers Torday: 
I'm not revaling the answer!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:59 Piers Torday
5:59
Nora - EarlyWord: 
This chat is now archived on the Penguin Young Readers page on EarlyWord -- http://penguinyrauthors.earlyword.com/last-wild-live-chat/
Wednesday May 21, 2014 5:59 Nora - EarlyWord
6:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
The next book in our program is THE FORBIDDEN LIBRARY. If you are not already a member of the Penguin Young Readers program, you can sign up here:

http://penguinyrauthors.ear...
Wednesday May 21, 2014 6:00 Nora - EarlyWord
6:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Goodbye, Piers, Lisa and the Penguin Young Readers Program members!
Wednesday May 21, 2014 6:00 Nora - EarlyWord
 
 

Live Chat, TODAY, 4 to 5 p.m. EDT

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

This live chat has now ended. Replay it, below, to get to know author Tom Sweterltisch and his first novel, Tomorrow and Tomorrow, coming in July (digital review copies available on NetGalley and Edelweiss), which Stewart O’Nan calls, “rich, absorbing, relentlessly inventive.”

To get free galleys of forthcoming books by debut authors, join Penguin’s First Flights program here.

 Live Chat with Thomas Sweterlitsch, TOMORROW AND TOMORROW(05/07/2014) 
3:45
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We will begin our live online chat with Thomas Sweterlitsch, author of TOMORROW AND TOMORROW in about 15 minutes
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:45 Nora - EarlyWord
3:46
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Here’s the cover of the book…
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:46 Nora - EarlyWord
3:46
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:46 
3:47
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Below is a special video message that Thomas recorded for Penguin First Flight members:
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:47 Nora - EarlyWord
3:47
Nora - EarlyWordNora - EarlyWord
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:47 
3:49
Nora - EarlyWord: 
A blurb from Stewart O’Nan:

Simultaneously trippy and hardboiled, Tomorrow and Tomorrow is a rich, absorbing, relentlessly inventive mindfuck, a smart, dark noir... Sweterlisch's debut is a wild mashup of Raymond Chandler, Philip K. Dick and William S. Burroughs, and, like their work, utterly visionary."--Stewart O'Nan author of "The Odds"
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:49 Nora - EarlyWord
3:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We’re glad to see so many chat participants gathering. You can send your questions through at any time. They'll go into a queue, and we'll submit as many of them as we can to Thomas before the end of the chat. Don’t worry about typos – and please ignore any that we commit!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:58 Nora - EarlyWord
3:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I see that Thomas has joined us -- welcome!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:58 Nora - EarlyWord
3:58
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hello!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:58 Thomas Sweterlitsch
3:59
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
And feel free to call me Tom!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:59 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Say hi again, Thomas!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:00 Nora - EarlyWord
4:01
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hello!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:01 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:01
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
My avatar looks like I'm standing in a wheat field, even though it's really just a shrub in my side yard...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:01 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:02
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Also, feel free to call me Tom!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:02 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:03
Nora - EarlyWord: 
There you are! I wanted to see your photo so I could note you look a bit different than you do in the video.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:03 Nora - EarlyWord
4:03
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Ah, you must mean the beard. Yep, it comes and goes. For the record--I'm fully bearded right now (hockey playoff season).
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:03 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:05
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Those of you out there, please say hi to Tom!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:05 Nora - EarlyWord
4:06
[Comment From Ref. LibrarianRef. Librarian: ] 
Hey, Tom -- loved the book!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Ref. Librarian
4:06
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Happy Wednesday Tom.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Guest
4:06
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Thanks!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:06
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
And a happy Wednesday to you, too!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:06
[Comment From PDPD: ] 
Hi Tom! Great book!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 PD
4:06
[Comment From Kids LibrarianKids Librarian: ] 
Hope you've got Spring there, Tom!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Kids Librarian
4:07
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
HI to Tom from the Midwest and personally I like the beard. :-)
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Lucy
4:07
[Comment From Sue DSue D: ] 
Good afternoon from St. Charles, Mo
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Sue D
4:07
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Thanks, PD!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:07
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Yes, Kids Librarian, it is full-on Spring here in Pittsburgh. Started out with a massive thunderstorm but not the sun's shining. Perfect weather.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:07
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
All right, Lucy!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:08
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Tell us about the cover – it doesn’t look very science fiction-y. Was the intentional?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:08 Nora - EarlyWord
4:09
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Good question, Nora. That's right--I think the flipped bottom Tomorrow is meant to convey a sort of feeling that there might be a mind-bending mystery at play...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:09 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:10
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
But at the same time, I know Putnam is interested in promoting this book as a mystery/thriller and a "literary" novel as much as a sci-fi book, so they probably stopped short of being "too sci fi"...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:10 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:10
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I love the cover quite a bit--I like that they used the skyline of Pittsburgh, though a few astute friends noticed that the picture itself is reversed!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:10 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:11
Nora - EarlyWord: 
For those that spot the flipped skyline, that could also read as mind-bending.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:11 Nora - EarlyWord
4:11
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Haha, that's right! All part of the plan.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:11 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:11
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I'm amused by how different the British cover is.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:11 Nora - EarlyWord
4:12
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:12 
4:12
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Looks almost like a spy novel!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:12 Nora - EarlyWord
4:12
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Yes, very different. I think the American cover focuses on the "post apocalyptic" moments of the book; the British cover seems to focus on the "man in danger" aspect.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:12 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:13
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Every time I see that British cover I try to place who that guy is.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:13 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:13
[Comment From LauraLaura: ] 
The British cover reminded me of the "Taken" movie posters with Liam Neeson on them.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:13 Laura
4:13
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
Perhaps the Brit cover was trying to present/focus on a noir aspect?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:13 Lucy
4:14
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Laura, oh yeah! I definitely see that!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:14 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:14
Nora - EarlyWord: 
This is your first book, but not your first published work, right?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:14 Nora - EarlyWord
4:14
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I think you're right, Lucy. Definitely reads more "thriller."
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:14 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:14
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
First book, yes. I've published a few short stories, all science fiction, on-line.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:14 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:15
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Did you set out to write science fiction, or did that evolve from the story you wanted to tell?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:15 Nora - EarlyWord
4:15
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I think genre should evolve from story--but it just so happens that all the good stories I come up with are science fiction!...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:15 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:16
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So, yes--all my ideas for future projects have a sci-fi element to them.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:16 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:17
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Does all of this talk about genres really matter?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:17 Nora - EarlyWord
4:18
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
"Genre" is a strange thing--especially right now. The only time I get frustrated by the genre question is when some people rank certain genres lower in importance than others.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:18 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:18
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
We're living in a moment when "high-art" and "low-art" are mashed together--maybe really starting with Warhol, but also in things like "Superflat" art/Murakami. It's an exciting time to write "genre."
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:18 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:19
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Ah, and then there's the favorite back-handed compliment -- "rises above genre"!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:19 Nora - EarlyWord
4:20
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
That's right!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:20 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:20
[Comment From Kids LibrarianKids Librarian: ] 
Have you ever thought about writing a YA book?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:20 Kids Librarian
4:21
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Thanks for the question, Kids Librarian! I've had an idea kicking around in my head about the Homestead Steel Mill Strike that I think could make a good YA book; but honestly, my writing tends to be fairly "R" rated, so I'll probably just stick with adult fiction.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:21 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:22
[Comment From Kids LibrarianKids Librarian: ] 
Interesting -- do you find the "R" rated stuff essential?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:22 Kids Librarian
4:23
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I think that material should flow from story/character. So, R rated stuff is never strictly-speaking essential, and some of my short stories are pretty clean.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:23 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:23
Nora - EarlyWord: 
You seem adept at online chatting, Tom -- you mentioned to me that you had some background for that. Tell us about it.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:23 Nora - EarlyWord
4:24
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
That's right, Nora--a handful of years ago I was the person at our library who manned the "InfoEyes" virtual reference desk. The chat interface was very similar to this one...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:24 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:25
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
We'd have people from all over the country pop up on the screen and ask questions--I'd find myself (in Pittsburgh) trying to track down answers about very local information in other states!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:25 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:26
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Did your experience working reference affect how you shaped the story or the character of Dominic?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:26 Nora - EarlyWord
4:27
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Absolutely. I have often thought about getting an MLIS degree specializing as an "archivist." ...And as I started thinking of ways that Dominic could access information he needs, my touchstone was always library work...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:27 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:28
[Comment From Sue DSue D: ] 
Those questions still happen at our very regular reference desks. Out of state or snow birds calling.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:28 Sue D
4:29
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
In earlier drafts of the novel I had TONS of sections about how exactly the Archive works, how it was connected to the Library of Congress. I was modeling it off the Library for the Blind services, ultimately run by the National Library Service/LOC. I even had an application for the Archive at one point.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:29 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:29
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
That's right, Sue D--even on the phones!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:29 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:30
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I enjoyed how you combined the familiar with the futuristic, letting me figure out some things (hey! That taxi doesn’t have a driver!) You really have to trust the reader to do that.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:30 Nora - EarlyWord
4:31
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Driverless Taxi--shout out to Total Recall...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:31 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:31
[Comment From PDPD: ] 
Really interesting take on SF. Did you live there? Did you ever eat at Memphis Minnie's :-)?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:31 PD
4:32
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi PD! Actually, I've never been to SF. I'm very familiar with Washington DC and Pittsburgh, but when I got to that last section I wanted to explore a city completely virtually (Google Street View), so that I could "flip" it in my mind: Pittsburgh the virtual city that I actually live in; SF the real city in the book that I'm exploring only virtually...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:32 Thomas Sweterlitsch
 
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Now THAT was living through Dominic!
  Nora - EarlyWord
4:33
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Plus, SF is where Vertigo takes place, which was one of the earliest and deepest influences on Tomorrow and Tomorrow.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:33 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:34
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Several of the authors we’ve had in this program have purposely set their books a bit in the past because they find today’s technology gets in the way of telling their stories -- for instance, communications are speeded up by email and you can find out things via Google, which can make it difficult to introduce tension. Your book does the opposite, with technology leaping ahead.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:34 Nora - EarlyWord
4:35
[Comment From Joe, MD LibrarianJoe, MD Librarian: ] 
I KNEW you knew D.C. well, but you def. had me fooled about San Fran Cisco!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:35 Joe, MD Librarian
4:35
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Great question, Nora. I often wonder at how common cell phones/the internet are in real life, but how infrequently they appear in fiction...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:35 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:36
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi Joe! That's good to hear!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:36 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:36
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Re: cell phones: in some ways, I think it's the kind of problem that happens in Shakespeare, where you just want the characters to talk to each other to make all their problems go away...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:36 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:37
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So the challenge as a writer has to be how to make the dramatic tension fit around current/future technologies. I have Dominic Google a lot of information, and in my plot I have a lot of that information "corrupted" so he can't find it out right away...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:37 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:37
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Also, funnily enough, I was a very late adapter to smart phones/mobile devices--I didn't have a cell phone until after this book was finished, so I was completely inventing what it's like to live with this stuff.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:37 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:38
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Re: San Francisco. I just had a couple of close friends move to SF, so hopefully I'll make it out there soon!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:38 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:38
Nora - EarlyWord: 
That is so amazing. I've gotten used to avoiding what I call "device zombies" on the streets of NYC.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:38 Nora - EarlyWord
4:39
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Full confession: I was a device zombie a little earlier this afternoon.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:39 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:40
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I was struck that Dominic seems to not only mourn his wife, but the city of Pittsburgh itself. As someone who lived in NYC during 9/11, that's very evocative. I remember a news report that astronauts on the space station could see the smoke rising and one sent a message that "I just want the folks in New York to know their city still looks very beautiful from space." — I couldn’t figure out why, but that bought me to tears. (Speaking of technology — I wasn’t sure if I remembered this correctly, so I googled it and got the exact quote!)
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:40 Nora - EarlyWord
4:41
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Sense of place is so vital to a good novel (speaking as a reader). So, I wanted Dominic to be as much in love with the past city as he was with his past life...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:41 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:42
[Comment From Pam, Kansas Lib.Pam, Kansas Lib.: ] 
It also made med think of how we mourn the old new Orleans.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:42 Pam, Kansas Lib.
4:43
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Interesting, Pam. In Pittsburgh, there is a very, very heavy sense of nostalgia for the way things once were (before the Steel mills left).
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:43 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:44
[Comment From Pam, Kansas Lib.Pam, Kansas Lib.: ] 
How scary is it to write about your family and your city disappearing?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:44 Pam, Kansas Lib.
4:45
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Good question, Pam. (I should Google this quote, but I'm going to wing it)--I once read a quote where an author suggested that you write about what horrifies you, so the emotion comes through. This book is basically a check list of my personal fears.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:45 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:46
Nora - EarlyWord: 
How did TOMORROW AND TOMORROW end up getting published?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:46 Nora - EarlyWord
4:46
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Welp, interesting question. Do you know the author Stewart O'Nan?He's been a favorite of mine for many years--I've read just about ever book he's written. He was born and raised in Pittsburgh but lived much of his life in New England...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:46 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:47
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
A handful of years ago, he moved back to Pittsburgh--and I was struck by thinking this world-famous writer, who is one of my favorites, lives very close to me...(Pittsburgh's a small place)...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:47 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:47
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So I did something completely out of character and wrote him a fan letter...That letter led to him reading a short story of mine, called The City Lies Within...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:47 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:47
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
He wrote back very enthusiastically about the short story, saying it's only problem is that it should be a novel...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:47 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:47
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So I made it into the novel that became "Tomorrow and Tomorrow." He got my foot in the door with his agent, but then the agent rejected the book...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:47 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:48
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So I spent the next full year rewriting the entire book. When I approached the agent again, he accepted! (There were many other bumps and details along the way).
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:48 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:49
[Comment From Joe, Maryland LibrarianJoe, Maryland Librarian: ] 
You mentioned publishing stories online. Do you think librarians are doing a good job of handling e-material?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:49 Joe, Maryland Librarian
4:50
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi Joe, wow--great question. I think libraries are making great strides to work with a format that will either become the core of the library's mission, or put library's out of business...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:50 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:51
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I know the Carnegie Public Library System here is making e-material a major focus of what the library is. I think that's a smart move. At the Library for the Blind, we reached an interesting point where we could circulate cassette books one at a time, or put almost every title on one flash drive and circulate it once. Interesting times.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:51 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:51
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I read the book has been optioned for a movie — that must have been exciting!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:51 Nora - EarlyWord
4:52
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
But to receive such encouragement based from a fan letter, how grand! I can see how that would inspire you to take the leap into writing a novel. Congratulations on it's publication, by the way.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:52 Lucy
4:52
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi Lucy--you wouldn't believe how excited I was! I remember my hands shaking as I opened his envelope back to me. We've since met, and he's a truly great, honest and friendly guy.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:52 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:53
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi Nora--that's right! It was optioned for a movie by Sony. I was working the reference desk on a particularly slow afternoon, when my agent called. He basically said, "all right, let me explain what's happening right now..."
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:53 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:54
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Of course, an option doesn't mean that the movie will be made! But, fingers crossed!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:54 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Let us enjoy the fantasy of getting that call at the reference desk! Did you scream!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We're getting close to the end, so get your final questions in!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Here's a last one from me:
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Privacy is a big issue in Dominic’s world. Many librarians have told me that they are shocked by how willing the general public is to hand over their information. Have you seen that, too?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
4:57
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Yeah, I've definitely seen that. I think we're struggling with the idea of privacy, what it means, how it can help/hurt us. Even I admit, that one of my reactions when it was learned the NSA can read my email, was, "welp, they're going to be pretty bored..." That being said, here at CMU they demonstrated facial recognition software that can scan you and find out all sorts of info about you--I find that very creepy.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:57 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
If librarians want to contact you for appearances, how can they reach you?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:58 Nora - EarlyWord
4:58
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Best way to contact me--about anything at all--is my email: Letterswitch @ gmail!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:58 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:59
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Great handle! Thanks for talking with us, Tom. Looking forward to your book's publication.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:59 Nora - EarlyWord
4:59
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Thanks for chatting, everyone! It was great to "meet" you all!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:59 Thomas Sweterlitsch
5:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Reminder to everyone -- This chat will be archived on the Penguin First Flights page on EarlyWord

http://penguindebutauthors....
Wednesday May 7, 2014 5:00 Nora - EarlyWord
5:01
Nora - EarlyWord: 
The book is coming out on July 10

If you’re a librarian and aren’t yet a First Flights member, you can still access digital readers copies until publication day on Edelweiss and NetGalley.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 5:01 Nora - EarlyWord
5:01
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Click below to join the Penguin First Flights program:

http://penguindebutauthors....
Wednesday May 7, 2014 5:01 Nora - EarlyWord
5:02
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Goodbye, everyone, and thanks for your questions!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 5:02 Nora - EarlyWord
 
 
 Live Chat with Thomas Sweterlitsch, TOMORROW AND TOMORROW(05/07/2014) 
3:45
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We will begin our live online chat with Thomas Sweterlitsch, author of TOMORROW AND TOMORROW in about 15 minutes
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:45 Nora - EarlyWord
3:46
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Here’s the cover of the book…
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:46 Nora - EarlyWord
3:46
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:46 
3:47
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Below is a special video message that Thomas recorded for Penguin First Flight members:
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:47 Nora - EarlyWord
3:47
Nora - EarlyWordNora - EarlyWord
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:47 
3:49
Nora - EarlyWord: 
A blurb from Stewart O’Nan:

Simultaneously trippy and hardboiled, Tomorrow and Tomorrow is a rich, absorbing, relentlessly inventive mindfuck, a smart, dark noir... Sweterlisch's debut is a wild mashup of Raymond Chandler, Philip K. Dick and William S. Burroughs, and, like their work, utterly visionary."--Stewart O'Nan author of "The Odds"
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:49 Nora - EarlyWord
3:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We’re glad to see so many chat participants gathering. You can send your questions through at any time. They'll go into a queue, and we'll submit as many of them as we can to Thomas before the end of the chat. Don’t worry about typos – and please ignore any that we commit!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:58 Nora - EarlyWord
3:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I see that Thomas has joined us -- welcome!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:58 Nora - EarlyWord
3:58
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hello!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:58 Thomas Sweterlitsch
3:59
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
And feel free to call me Tom!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 3:59 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Say hi again, Thomas!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:00 Nora - EarlyWord
4:01
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hello!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:01 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:01
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
My avatar looks like I'm standing in a wheat field, even though it's really just a shrub in my side yard...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:01 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:02
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Also, feel free to call me Tom!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:02 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:03
Nora - EarlyWord: 
There you are! I wanted to see your photo so I could note you look a bit different than you do in the video.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:03 Nora - EarlyWord
4:03
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Ah, you must mean the beard. Yep, it comes and goes. For the record--I'm fully bearded right now (hockey playoff season).
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:03 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:05
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Those of you out there, please say hi to Tom!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:05 Nora - EarlyWord
4:06
[Comment From Ref. LibrarianRef. Librarian: ] 
Hey, Tom -- loved the book!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Ref. Librarian
4:06
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Happy Wednesday Tom.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Guest
4:06
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Thanks!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:06
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
And a happy Wednesday to you, too!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:06
[Comment From PDPD: ] 
Hi Tom! Great book!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 PD
4:06
[Comment From Kids LibrarianKids Librarian: ] 
Hope you've got Spring there, Tom!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:06 Kids Librarian
4:07
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
HI to Tom from the Midwest and personally I like the beard. :-)
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Lucy
4:07
[Comment From Sue DSue D: ] 
Good afternoon from St. Charles, Mo
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Sue D
4:07
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Thanks, PD!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:07
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Yes, Kids Librarian, it is full-on Spring here in Pittsburgh. Started out with a massive thunderstorm but not the sun's shining. Perfect weather.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:07
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
All right, Lucy!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:07 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:08
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Tell us about the cover – it doesn’t look very science fiction-y. Was the intentional?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:08 Nora - EarlyWord
4:09
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Good question, Nora. That's right--I think the flipped bottom Tomorrow is meant to convey a sort of feeling that there might be a mind-bending mystery at play...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:09 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:10
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
But at the same time, I know Putnam is interested in promoting this book as a mystery/thriller and a "literary" novel as much as a sci-fi book, so they probably stopped short of being "too sci fi"...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:10 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:10
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I love the cover quite a bit--I like that they used the skyline of Pittsburgh, though a few astute friends noticed that the picture itself is reversed!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:10 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:11
Nora - EarlyWord: 
For those that spot the flipped skyline, that could also read as mind-bending.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:11 Nora - EarlyWord
4:11
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Haha, that's right! All part of the plan.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:11 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:11
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I'm amused by how different the British cover is.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:11 Nora - EarlyWord
4:12
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:12 
4:12
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Looks almost like a spy novel!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:12 Nora - EarlyWord
4:12
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Yes, very different. I think the American cover focuses on the "post apocalyptic" moments of the book; the British cover seems to focus on the "man in danger" aspect.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:12 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:13
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Every time I see that British cover I try to place who that guy is.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:13 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:13
[Comment From LauraLaura: ] 
The British cover reminded me of the "Taken" movie posters with Liam Neeson on them.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:13 Laura
4:13
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
Perhaps the Brit cover was trying to present/focus on a noir aspect?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:13 Lucy
4:14
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Laura, oh yeah! I definitely see that!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:14 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:14
Nora - EarlyWord: 
This is your first book, but not your first published work, right?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:14 Nora - EarlyWord
4:14
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I think you're right, Lucy. Definitely reads more "thriller."
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:14 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:14
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
First book, yes. I've published a few short stories, all science fiction, on-line.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:14 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:15
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Did you set out to write science fiction, or did that evolve from the story you wanted to tell?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:15 Nora - EarlyWord
4:15
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I think genre should evolve from story--but it just so happens that all the good stories I come up with are science fiction!...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:15 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:16
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So, yes--all my ideas for future projects have a sci-fi element to them.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:16 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:17
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Does all of this talk about genres really matter?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:17 Nora - EarlyWord
4:18
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
"Genre" is a strange thing--especially right now. The only time I get frustrated by the genre question is when some people rank certain genres lower in importance than others.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:18 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:18
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
We're living in a moment when "high-art" and "low-art" are mashed together--maybe really starting with Warhol, but also in things like "Superflat" art/Murakami. It's an exciting time to write "genre."
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:18 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:19
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Ah, and then there's the favorite back-handed compliment -- "rises above genre"!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:19 Nora - EarlyWord
4:20
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
That's right!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:20 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:20
[Comment From Kids LibrarianKids Librarian: ] 
Have you ever thought about writing a YA book?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:20 Kids Librarian
4:21
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Thanks for the question, Kids Librarian! I've had an idea kicking around in my head about the Homestead Steel Mill Strike that I think could make a good YA book; but honestly, my writing tends to be fairly "R" rated, so I'll probably just stick with adult fiction.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:21 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:22
[Comment From Kids LibrarianKids Librarian: ] 
Interesting -- do you find the "R" rated stuff essential?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:22 Kids Librarian
4:23
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I think that material should flow from story/character. So, R rated stuff is never strictly-speaking essential, and some of my short stories are pretty clean.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:23 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:23
Nora - EarlyWord: 
You seem adept at online chatting, Tom -- you mentioned to me that you had some background for that. Tell us about it.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:23 Nora - EarlyWord
4:24
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
That's right, Nora--a handful of years ago I was the person at our library who manned the "InfoEyes" virtual reference desk. The chat interface was very similar to this one...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:24 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:25
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
We'd have people from all over the country pop up on the screen and ask questions--I'd find myself (in Pittsburgh) trying to track down answers about very local information in other states!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:25 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:26
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Did your experience working reference affect how you shaped the story or the character of Dominic?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:26 Nora - EarlyWord
4:27
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Absolutely. I have often thought about getting an MLIS degree specializing as an "archivist." ...And as I started thinking of ways that Dominic could access information he needs, my touchstone was always library work...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:27 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:28
[Comment From Sue DSue D: ] 
Those questions still happen at our very regular reference desks. Out of state or snow birds calling.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:28 Sue D
4:29
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
In earlier drafts of the novel I had TONS of sections about how exactly the Archive works, how it was connected to the Library of Congress. I was modeling it off the Library for the Blind services, ultimately run by the National Library Service/LOC. I even had an application for the Archive at one point.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:29 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:29
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
That's right, Sue D--even on the phones!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:29 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:30
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I enjoyed how you combined the familiar with the futuristic, letting me figure out some things (hey! That taxi doesn’t have a driver!) You really have to trust the reader to do that.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:30 Nora - EarlyWord
4:31
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Driverless Taxi--shout out to Total Recall...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:31 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:31
[Comment From PDPD: ] 
Really interesting take on SF. Did you live there? Did you ever eat at Memphis Minnie's :-)?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:31 PD
4:32
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi PD! Actually, I've never been to SF. I'm very familiar with Washington DC and Pittsburgh, but when I got to that last section I wanted to explore a city completely virtually (Google Street View), so that I could "flip" it in my mind: Pittsburgh the virtual city that I actually live in; SF the real city in the book that I'm exploring only virtually...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:32 Thomas Sweterlitsch
 
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Now THAT was living through Dominic!
  Nora - EarlyWord
4:33
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Plus, SF is where Vertigo takes place, which was one of the earliest and deepest influences on Tomorrow and Tomorrow.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:33 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:34
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Several of the authors we’ve had in this program have purposely set their books a bit in the past because they find today’s technology gets in the way of telling their stories -- for instance, communications are speeded up by email and you can find out things via Google, which can make it difficult to introduce tension. Your book does the opposite, with technology leaping ahead.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:34 Nora - EarlyWord
4:35
[Comment From Joe, MD LibrarianJoe, MD Librarian: ] 
I KNEW you knew D.C. well, but you def. had me fooled about San Fran Cisco!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:35 Joe, MD Librarian
4:35
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Great question, Nora. I often wonder at how common cell phones/the internet are in real life, but how infrequently they appear in fiction...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:35 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:36
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi Joe! That's good to hear!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:36 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:36
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Re: cell phones: in some ways, I think it's the kind of problem that happens in Shakespeare, where you just want the characters to talk to each other to make all their problems go away...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:36 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:37
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So the challenge as a writer has to be how to make the dramatic tension fit around current/future technologies. I have Dominic Google a lot of information, and in my plot I have a lot of that information "corrupted" so he can't find it out right away...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:37 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:37
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Also, funnily enough, I was a very late adapter to smart phones/mobile devices--I didn't have a cell phone until after this book was finished, so I was completely inventing what it's like to live with this stuff.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:37 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:38
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Re: San Francisco. I just had a couple of close friends move to SF, so hopefully I'll make it out there soon!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:38 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:38
Nora - EarlyWord: 
That is so amazing. I've gotten used to avoiding what I call "device zombies" on the streets of NYC.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:38 Nora - EarlyWord
4:39
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Full confession: I was a device zombie a little earlier this afternoon.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:39 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:40
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I was struck that Dominic seems to not only mourn his wife, but the city of Pittsburgh itself. As someone who lived in NYC during 9/11, that's very evocative. I remember a news report that astronauts on the space station could see the smoke rising and one sent a message that "I just want the folks in New York to know their city still looks very beautiful from space." — I couldn’t figure out why, but that bought me to tears. (Speaking of technology — I wasn’t sure if I remembered this correctly, so I googled it and got the exact quote!)
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:40 Nora - EarlyWord
4:41
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Sense of place is so vital to a good novel (speaking as a reader). So, I wanted Dominic to be as much in love with the past city as he was with his past life...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:41 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:42
[Comment From Pam, Kansas Lib.Pam, Kansas Lib.: ] 
It also made med think of how we mourn the old new Orleans.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:42 Pam, Kansas Lib.
4:43
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Interesting, Pam. In Pittsburgh, there is a very, very heavy sense of nostalgia for the way things once were (before the Steel mills left).
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:43 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:44
[Comment From Pam, Kansas Lib.Pam, Kansas Lib.: ] 
How scary is it to write about your family and your city disappearing?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:44 Pam, Kansas Lib.
4:45
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Good question, Pam. (I should Google this quote, but I'm going to wing it)--I once read a quote where an author suggested that you write about what horrifies you, so the emotion comes through. This book is basically a check list of my personal fears.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:45 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:46
Nora - EarlyWord: 
How did TOMORROW AND TOMORROW end up getting published?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:46 Nora - EarlyWord
4:46
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Welp, interesting question. Do you know the author Stewart O'Nan?He's been a favorite of mine for many years--I've read just about ever book he's written. He was born and raised in Pittsburgh but lived much of his life in New England...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:46 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:47
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
A handful of years ago, he moved back to Pittsburgh--and I was struck by thinking this world-famous writer, who is one of my favorites, lives very close to me...(Pittsburgh's a small place)...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:47 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:47
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So I did something completely out of character and wrote him a fan letter...That letter led to him reading a short story of mine, called The City Lies Within...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:47 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:47
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
He wrote back very enthusiastically about the short story, saying it's only problem is that it should be a novel...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:47 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:47
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So I made it into the novel that became "Tomorrow and Tomorrow." He got my foot in the door with his agent, but then the agent rejected the book...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:47 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:48
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
So I spent the next full year rewriting the entire book. When I approached the agent again, he accepted! (There were many other bumps and details along the way).
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:48 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:49
[Comment From Joe, Maryland LibrarianJoe, Maryland Librarian: ] 
You mentioned publishing stories online. Do you think librarians are doing a good job of handling e-material?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:49 Joe, Maryland Librarian
4:50
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi Joe, wow--great question. I think libraries are making great strides to work with a format that will either become the core of the library's mission, or put library's out of business...
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:50 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:51
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
I know the Carnegie Public Library System here is making e-material a major focus of what the library is. I think that's a smart move. At the Library for the Blind, we reached an interesting point where we could circulate cassette books one at a time, or put almost every title on one flash drive and circulate it once. Interesting times.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:51 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:51
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I read the book has been optioned for a movie — that must have been exciting!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:51 Nora - EarlyWord
4:52
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
But to receive such encouragement based from a fan letter, how grand! I can see how that would inspire you to take the leap into writing a novel. Congratulations on it's publication, by the way.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:52 Lucy
4:52
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi Lucy--you wouldn't believe how excited I was! I remember my hands shaking as I opened his envelope back to me. We've since met, and he's a truly great, honest and friendly guy.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:52 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:53
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Hi Nora--that's right! It was optioned for a movie by Sony. I was working the reference desk on a particularly slow afternoon, when my agent called. He basically said, "all right, let me explain what's happening right now..."
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:53 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:54
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Of course, an option doesn't mean that the movie will be made! But, fingers crossed!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:54 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Let us enjoy the fantasy of getting that call at the reference desk! Did you scream!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We're getting close to the end, so get your final questions in!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Here's a last one from me:
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Privacy is a big issue in Dominic’s world. Many librarians have told me that they are shocked by how willing the general public is to hand over their information. Have you seen that, too?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
4:57
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Yeah, I've definitely seen that. I think we're struggling with the idea of privacy, what it means, how it can help/hurt us. Even I admit, that one of my reactions when it was learned the NSA can read my email, was, "welp, they're going to be pretty bored..." That being said, here at CMU they demonstrated facial recognition software that can scan you and find out all sorts of info about you--I find that very creepy.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:57 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
If librarians want to contact you for appearances, how can they reach you?
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:58 Nora - EarlyWord
4:58
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Best way to contact me--about anything at all--is my email: Letterswitch @ gmail!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:58 Thomas Sweterlitsch
4:59
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Great handle! Thanks for talking with us, Tom. Looking forward to your book's publication.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:59 Nora - EarlyWord
4:59
Thomas Sweterlitsch: 
Thanks for chatting, everyone! It was great to "meet" you all!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 4:59 Thomas Sweterlitsch
5:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Reminder to everyone -- This chat will be archived on the Penguin First Flights page on EarlyWord

http://penguindebutauthors....
Wednesday May 7, 2014 5:00 Nora - EarlyWord
5:01
Nora - EarlyWord: 
The book is coming out on July 10

If you’re a librarian and aren’t yet a First Flights member, you can still access digital readers copies until publication day on Edelweiss and NetGalley.
Wednesday May 7, 2014 5:01 Nora - EarlyWord
5:01
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Click below to join the Penguin First Flights program:

http://penguindebutauthors....
Wednesday May 7, 2014 5:01 Nora - EarlyWord
5:02
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Goodbye, everyone, and thanks for your questions!
Wednesday May 7, 2014 5:02 Nora - EarlyWord
 
 

Sign Up NOW for Author Events At Book Expo

Friday, April 25th, 2014

The AAP has just announced its roster of events exclusively for librarians, to be held at the upcoming Book Expo America, which runs Wednesday, May 28, through Saturday, May 31.

Below are those that require advance registration. Fellow procrastinators — don’t wait. BEA events are selling out fast (both LJ ‘s Day of Dialog and SLJ‘s are already sold out, before the full line-up of panelists have been announced).

Details on all eight programs are here BEA 2014 — AAP Events for Librarians. Below are those that require registration:

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28TH, 6:30 pm.
Eighth Annual BookExpo America Adult Librarians’ Dinner
Co-hosted by AAP and LibraryReads
Yale Club, NYC (52 Vanderbilt Avenue, Grand Ballroom

So We Read On9780143126683_f9440

We are particularly excited about this one because it’s hosted by one of our favorite reviewers, Maureen Corrigan of NPR’s Fresh Air and because it features the author of a book that’s been getting GalleyChat buzz, Joel Dicker, The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair (Penguin Books, 5/27). Full list of authors here – BEA 2014 Adult Librarian Dinner Invitation.

Register your interest to attend HERE. AAP will confirm if they are able to meet your request.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28TH, 7:00 pm.
Third Annual BookExpo America Children’s Librarians’ Dinner
Co-hosted by AAP and School Library Journal
Princeton Club of New York (15 W. 43rd Street, James Madison Ballroom)

9781423178651_3537f  0803741715_94edb

The panel of seven authors includes John Rocco, author of the 2012 Caldecott Honor Book, Black Out. His forthcoming book is Blizzard (Disney/Hyperion, 10/28) and B.J. Novack, who has recently been moonlighting as an author. He will publish his first book for kids this fall, which will, of course, be non-traditional, The Book with No Pictures(Penguin Young Readers/Dial, 9/30). Full list of authors here — Third Annual BookExpo America Children’s Librarians’ Dinner Invitation.

Please register your interest to attend HERE, AAP will confirm if they are able to meet your request.

THURSDAY, MAY 28TH, 12:15 pm – 1:45 pm.
Annual BEA Librarians Author Lunch
Jacob K. Javits Center, Room 1E12-13

9780670025596_1691b  9781473506350

Features a hot group of authors, including Deborah Harkness, Garth Stein, and Kathy Reichs. Full list   here — BEA 2014 AAP Adult Librarian Lunch Invitation.

Please register your interest to attend HERE,. AAP will confirm if they are able to meet your request.

Live Chat With Laura Marx Fitzgerald, UNDER THE EGG

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

The chat has now ended, you can read it below.

Join us to receive galleys and get to know new authors. If you are not already a member, you can sign up here: Penguin Young Readers program

 Live Chat with Laura Marx Fitzgerald, UNDER THE EGG(04/23/2014) 
4:44
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We will begin our live online chat with Laura Marx Fitzgerald, author of UNDER THE EGG in about 15 minutes
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:44 Nora - EarlyWord
4:45
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Meanwhile, here’s the cover of the book…
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:45 Nora - EarlyWord
4:45
Nora - EarlyWord
Under the Egg, Cover
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:45 
4:46
Nora - EarlyWord: 
And excerpts from the reviews…
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:46 Nora - EarlyWord
4:46
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Betsy Bird, Fuse 8 (School Library Journal)
Betsy selected UNDER THE EGG as a featured review (full review here -- http://bit.ly/1ia1Ngn

“When they tell you that the book is “From the Mixed-Up Files meets Chasing Vermeer” I suggest you not believe them. Yes, there is a famous piece of art and yes there is a mystery, but the mystery in this book is so much stronger than any art-related children’s book mystery I’ve read before that everything else just pales in comparison .. Uniquely readable, entirely charming, and a pleasure from start to finish. Debuts this good are meant to be discovered.”
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:46 Nora - EarlyWord
4:47
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Kirkus Reviews
“This debut novel weaves art appreciation, restoration and dating techniques, and bits of history from the Renaissance and World War II into a fast-paced mystery. As the novel opens, 13-year-old Theodora Tenpenny explains her thrifty hobby of collecting trash from the city streets and turning it into useful objects. Then she recounts what happened merely three months ago: She found her adored grandfather, Jack, lying bloodied on a city street and heard his dying exhortation to "Look under the egg." Theodora, who has spent her life living with her emotionally incapacitated mother and her crusty, artistic, capable grandfather, knows she must follow this clue in order to become the family's next breadwinner. (Readers must suspend disbelief regarding social services in Manhattan.) Fortuitously, Theodora befriends Bodhi, also 13 but a member of a family of Hollywood celebrities. Theodora's knowledge of art history and Bodhi's skills in acting and in technology enable the girls to puzzle out the importance of Jack's final words.”
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:47 Nora - EarlyWord
4:48
Nora - EarlyWord: 

Kirkus Reviews

“This debut novel weaves art appreciation, restoration and dating techniques, and bits of history from the Renaissance and World War II into a fast-paced mystery. As the novel opens, 13-year-old Theodora Tenpenny explains her thrifty hobby of collecting trash from the city streets and turning it into useful objects. Then she recounts what happened merely three months ago: She found her adored grandfather, Jack, lying bloodied on a city street and heard his dying exhortation to "Look under the egg." Theodora, who has spent her life living with her emotionally incapacitated mother and her crusty, artistic, capable grandfather, knows she must follow this clue in order to become the family's next breadwinner. (Readers must suspend disbelief regarding social services in Manhattan.) Fortuitously, Theodora befriends Bodhi, also 13 but a member of a family of Hollywood celebrities. Theodora's knowledge of art history and Bodhi's skills in acting and in technology enable the girls to puzzle out the importance of Jack's final words.”

Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:48 Nora - EarlyWord
4:48
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
I just ordered it today!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:48 Guest
4:49
Nora - EarlyWord: 

Booklist -- Starred review

“Smart and determined, down-to-earth and insightful, Theo makes an engaging narrator as she follows a winding trail of discovery. Along the way, Fitzgerald includes a good bit of art history, which becomes as interesting as the interplay between the two friends … Readers who loved E. L. Konigsburg's From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (1967) and Blue Balliett's Chasing Vermeer (2004) won't want to put this one down.”

Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:49 Nora - EarlyWord
4:50
Nora - EarlyWord: 

And, Horn Book wrote about an aspect of the book that ties into a recent film --

Horn Book Magazine

After delving into her grandfather's military past -- he was one of the famous Monuments Men — [Theo] realizes the mystery stretches all the way back to Nazi Germany and Hitler's fine-art plundering. Fitzgerald moves beyond the all-too-familiar conventions of the "X marks the spot" story line to offer a gripping mystery with high stakes and moving historical context…

Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:50 Nora - EarlyWord
4:51
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
I'm about 2/3 of the way through and really enjoying the story - can't wait to share it with tween readers.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:51 Guest
4:56
Nora - EarlyWord: 

Glad to see so many chat participants gathering. You can send your questions through at any time. They'll go into a queue, and we'll submit as many of them as we can to Laura before the end of the chat. Don’t worry about typos – and please forgive any that we commit!

Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:56 Nora - EarlyWord
4:59
Nora - EarlyWord: 

Laura has joined us -- welcome!

Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:59 Nora - EarlyWord
4:59
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Hi! So glad to be here!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 4:59 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 

And Lisa is here, too1

Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:00 Nora - EarlyWord
5:00
lisa von drasek: 
Are we ready to rock, Nora?!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:00 lisa von drasek
5:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 

I see several others out there -- please say hi!

Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:00 Nora - EarlyWord
5:01
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Loved this book! What is the Guided Reading Level for this book?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:01 Deborah Baldwin
5:01
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I know Penguin has suggested 8-12yo, but I really wrote it with 10-14yo in mind.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:01 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:02
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
In terms of a "letter" level, I'm not sure. Maybe Lisa, our librarian can suggest?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:02 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:02
lisa von drasek: 
Dewey: -Fic-; Int Lvl: 3-6; Rd Lvl: 4.9
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:02 lisa von drasek
5:02
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Well, there ya go.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:02 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:03
[Comment From shighleyshighley: ] 
Students really appreciate it when we can share insights from an author
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:03 shighley
5:03
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Thank you!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:03 Deborah Baldwin
5:03
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Wondering if this would be a good independent read for Third Graders for a mystery unit... or better for a read aloud.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:03 Deborah Baldwin
5:03
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
shighley, I love talking about the process behind the book, so ask anything that intrigues you!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:03 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:03
lisa von drasek: 
Deborah,
You know your class best. What have you been reading to them now?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:03 lisa von drasek
5:04
Nora - EarlyWord: 
There's a great Resource Guide on Laura's site ...
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:04 Nora - EarlyWord
5:04
Nora - EarlyWord
UNDER THE EGG Discussion Guide
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:04 
5:04
[Comment From SarahSarah: ] 
I think this will be a great title for book discussion! What type of research did you do to prepare to write the book?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:04 Sarah
5:04
Nora - EarlyWord: 
UNDER THE EGG Resources
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:04 Nora - EarlyWord
5:04
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Just a plug that it's aligned with the Common Core.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:04 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:05
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I did tons of reading on every subject touched on in the book:
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:05 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:05
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
everything from art history to backyard chicken raising!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:05 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:05
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
I am excited to check out the Discussion Guide. What motivated you to write this book?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:05 Deborah Baldwin
5:05
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Sounds like maybe a Read Aloud for Third Graders. Thank you!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:05 Deborah Baldwin
5:05
lisa von drasek: 
repeating Sarah's question What type of research did you do to prepare to write the book?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:05 lisa von drasek
5:05
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Two big helps: a book (and documentary) called The Rape of Europa
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:05 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:06
[Comment From Jenna GoodallJenna Goodall: ] 
Hi Laura and everyone! Loved the book. My co-workers do, too! :)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:06 Jenna Goodall
5:06
[Comment From shighleyshighley: ] 
What background knowledge do you think would be most helpful for the students?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:06 shighley
5:06
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
The documentary is even appropriate for kids. It's about the Nazi plundering of Europe, and has many moving firsthand testimonials.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:06 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:07
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
re: What motivated me to write the book . . . I'd wanted to write an art history mystery for a long time --
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:07 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:07
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
kind of From the Mixed Up Files meets The Westing Game (my two favorite childhood books)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:07 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:07
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I was also thinking a lot about pioneer and Great Depression era living. This was post the 2008 stock market crash . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:07 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:08
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
which gave me the idea for the characters of Jack and Theo, who are living a kind of homesteading lifestyle in the middle of glittering Greenwich Village
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:08 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:08
[Comment From Jenna GoodallJenna Goodall: ] 
Are you thrifty like Theo?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:08 Jenna Goodall
5:08
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I am! I am embarrassed to say how much of my wardrobe has been salvaged from the streets of Brooklyn . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:08 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:08
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
And now I regret telling you all that . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:08 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:08
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
In terms of what background a kid needs to read the book . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:08 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:09
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I would say none!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:09 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:09
[Comment From Noreen TrotskyNoreen Trotsky: ] 
How long did it take you to write this book?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:09 Noreen Trotsky
5:09
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I wrote the book for complete novices to art history . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:09 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:09
Nora - EarlyWord: 
But, you do offer great resources on your site ...
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:09 Nora - EarlyWord
5:09
Nora - EarlyWord
Under the Egg, Resources
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:09 
5:09
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
and included the character of Bodhi as the sort of stand in for the reader.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:09 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:09
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
She is coming to the world of art as newly as any middle school reader would be.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:09 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:10
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
(Is newly a word?)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:10 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:10
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Oh yes, I LOADED my website with resources on EVERYTHING:
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:10 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:10
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Raphael, the Renaissance, researching your own relatives' holocaust or military records. Even a pickled beet recipe!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:10 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:11
lisa von drasek: 
I was going to disagree with you about prior knowledge but actually the book inspired further research on my part.!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:11 lisa von drasek
5:11
[Comment From NJ School LibrarianNJ School Librarian: ] 
Love the opening line – “It was the find of the century. Or so I thought at the time.” Did you have to work hard for that, or did it come easily?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:11 NJ School Librarian
5:11
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Noreen, I started noodling the idea for the book in 2009. Started writing in earnest in 2011, and sold it in 2012.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:11 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:11
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
What character from the story do you most identify with?...Why?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:11 Deborah Baldwin
5:11
[Comment From shighleyshighley: ] 
Sure, as in newly-minted...?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:11 shighley
5:11
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
NJ School Librarian: That line came to me as soon as I had the idea for the book! . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:11 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:12
[Comment From NJ School LibrarianNJ School Librarian: ] 
How hard was it to sell the book?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:12 NJ School Librarian
5:12
[Comment From SarahSarah: ] 
Often first novels are a bit autobiographical. What else do you have in common with the characters?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:12 Sarah
5:12
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I wonder now if it was really the right fit, but I couldn't let it go! Glad to hear it resonated with you.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:12 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:12
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Opening line is a great hook!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:12 Deborah Baldwin
5:13
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Deborah: I am a lot like Jack, except I can't even hammer a nail. I guess I aspire to be like Jack. I have the same sense of independence . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:13 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:13
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
But like Theo, I need to be forced to connect to my community. Her journey was kind of written to remind myself to do the same.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:13 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:14
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
And I had to do the same to write the book. So many pieces of the book are there b/c I started asking "What does an x-ray room look like? What happens if you walk into Sotheby's with a painting?" So many people gave me advice and information.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:14 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:14
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
NJ School Librarian: I was insanely lucky. I had three agent offers within a week of submitting, and sold the book a week after submitting to publishers.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:14 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:14
lisa von drasek: 
I was thinking about how independent Theo is...how capable...Do you think that it is realist that a kid this age with a Mom barely grasping reality could hold the household together?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:14 lisa von drasek
5:15
[Comment From MI LibrarianMI Librarian: ] 
This may sound out of left field -- but, I’m always curious about dedications. Yours is to Eleanor – who is that?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:15 MI Librarian
5:15
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
The key to understanding Theo:
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:15 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:15
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
You have to remember that Theo was raised by a man who quit school early to support his mom and sister in the Depression.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:15 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:15
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
He had a job starting at the age of 8
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:15 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:16
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
so Jack never thought it was too much to ask Theo at the age of 13 to run a household.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:16 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:16
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
A huge inspiration in this vein for Theo was Mattie Ross from True Grit.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:16 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:16
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
MI Librarian: Eleanor is my daughter!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:16 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:17
lisa von drasek: 
have you pickled beets?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:17 lisa von drasek
5:17
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
(In an aside, Eleanor Roosevelt lived in a house with connecting doors in NYC, just like Theo.)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:17 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:17
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I have never pickled beets. I tried to make sauerkraut once that ended disastrously.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:17 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:17
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Unlike Theo, I love beets.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:17 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:17
[Comment From SarahSarah: ] 
I noticed in your bio that you have two children. Does that mean you are working on another book to dedicate to the other child? What are you working on next?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:17 Sarah
5:18
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Who was your inspiration for Jack?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:18 Deborah Baldwin
5:18
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Yes, I'm working on another art history mystery. This one is about kids who solve an art heist (much like the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist of 1990), but uncover a much darker mystery behind the theft . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:18 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:18
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I will have to dedicate that to my son.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:18 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:19
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Jack was largely inspired by a brilliant but irascible professor I had named Jack Stillgoe.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:19 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:19
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Sorry, that should be John Stillgoe
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:19 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:19
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
http://www.people.fas.harva...
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:19 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:20
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
He taught and wrote about the American landscape -- by which meant everything we see around us . . . not just art.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:20 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:20
lisa von drasek: 
you had mentioned the enormous amount of research that you had done to "get things right" in the book. Did you get it all on "google?" she asked knowing that wouldn't be possible.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:20 lisa von drasek
5:20
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
He would pick up catalogs and manhole covers and old Coke advertisements and have us "Look closer!" -- trying to decode what they were saying to us.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:20 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:20
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
I know people my age (40's) who grew up in Manhattan and are independent like Theo, but it seems kids growing up there now are not as much. Did you grow up in NYC?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:20 pwbalto
5:20
[Comment From SarahSarah: ] 
Your website is lovely and easy to navigate for teachers and librarians. Thanks for providing so many resources!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:20 Sarah
5:21
[Comment From shighleyshighley: ] 
Will this chat be archived in some way so that I can remember all of these great insights to share with students?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:21 shighley
 
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Thanks for asking! The chat will be archived on the site -- http://penguinyrauthors.ear... -- it will be up right after we finish. You can find the previous two chat there as well.
  Nora - EarlyWord
5:21
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I did get a lot on Google. Google is great for people like me who love wearing pajamas on the couch.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:21 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:21
Nora - EarlyWord: 
You must have also spent a lot of time at the Metropolitan Museum...
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:21 Nora - EarlyWord
5:21
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I also went to places like the Met's library, the Center for Jewish History, spent LOTS of time at the NYPL and Brooklyn Public Library.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:21 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:21
Nora - EarlyWord
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:21 
5:22
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Did the book Monuments Men influence you at all?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:22 Deborah Baldwin
5:22
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Sarah, I'm glad you like the website! Thanks!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:22 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:22
[Comment From MI LibrarianMI Librarian: ] 
The book came out last month -- any interesting reactions?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:22 MI Librarian
5:22
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
pwbalto, I grew up in small college towns. . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:22 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:22
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
But I had the same experience: walking to school by myself, riding bikes while my parents had no idea where I was as a kid. I think so many of us grew up that way and miss that for our own kids.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:22 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:23
lisa von drasek: 
did you have a favorite librarian growing up?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:23 lisa von drasek
5:23
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Deborah: I used the MOnuments Men book as a key part of my research and was stunned to discover that George Clooney was making it into a movie!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:23 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:23
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
The bigger museums have terrific collections databases on their sites. You have to look sometimes, they can be hard to find. - :paula
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:23 pwbalto
5:23
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
It was fun to see everything come to life on the big screen.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:23 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:23
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
pwbalto: I agree entirely, and I use those databases a lot.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:23 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:24
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Ah yes, I had a favorite librarian:
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:24 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:24
[Comment From Jenna GoodallJenna Goodall: ] 
I loved the librarian in this book! Yay for breaking stereotypes. :)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:24 Jenna Goodall
5:24
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Mrs. Jeffers at the Norman OK library. I especially loved her b/c she nominated me to go to Okalhoma City and help present the Sequoia Award to Bill Wallace for A Dog Called Kitty.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:24 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:25
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
As you can tell, like Theo, I was a library frequent flyer even then. :-)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:25 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:26
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Jenna: I used to live in Williamsburg Bklyn where there were so many hipster MLIS types! Living there, Eddie seemed more like a librarian stereotype than the cardigan-wearing bespectacled octogenarian!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:26 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:26
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Proud library moment:
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:26 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:26
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I got a notice from the Brooklyn Public Library recently honoring me as a "Power User" = I've checked out more than 1000 books.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:26 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:27
lisa von drasek: 
Instead of the classic children's book trope of getting rid of all the grown ups, you have populated the book with idiosyncratic adults.
can you talk about that?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:27 lisa von drasek
5:27
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
How do you think all of that reading influences your writing?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:27 Deborah Baldwin
5:28
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
The one quibble I've seen from other librarians is the stain on the street at the beginning of the book. Was that a big decision on your part to put that in?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:28 pwbalto
5:28
[Comment From NJ School LibrarianNJ School Librarian: ] 
Will your next book deal with Renaissance art, too?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:28 NJ School Librarian
5:28
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
*stealing Power User idea*
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:28 pwbalto
5:28
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Wow, so many questions! Hang on!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:28 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:29
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Idiosyncratic adults is what I love about living in NYC!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:29 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:29
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
That's the true diversity of the city. And I love how they come together and mix it up here.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:29 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:30
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I did have to engineer a way for Theo and Bodhi to wander the streets w/o parents herding them into cello lessons, and their backgrounds permitted that.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:30 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:30
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I also wanted kids to know how many adults are out there who can help them scaffold unique learning experiences for them, if that doesn't sound too wonky.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:30 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:31
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Deborah: Simply put, I am not that creative or original. I can't come up with ideas staring at a blank screen . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:31 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:31
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I get all my ideas from reading, and then find ways to twine them together into a story.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:31 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:31
[Comment From SarahSarah: ] 
You mentioned some classic mysteries that inspired you. Were you inspired by any modern stories? Maybe because of the common NYC setting, I was reminded of When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead as I was reading.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:31 Sarah
5:31
[Comment From Bklyn’erBklyn’er: ] 
You live in Brooklyn -- are you able to give your kids a sense of independence, or are you forced to "helicopter"?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:31 Bklyn’er
5:32
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
pwbalto: I dunno. There's something about all those mysterious stains on the street that suggest stories of their own.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:32 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:32
[Comment From DaisyDaisy: ] 
We're librarians! We LOVE wonky!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:32 Daisy
5:32
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
It didn't bother me, but apparently it bothers some. Sorry for that!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:32 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:32
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
NJ School Librarian: The next book will encompass paintings from across periods and genres. . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:32 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:32
lisa von drasek: 
anybody out there doing Mock Newberys? Under the Egg lends itself to rich discussions.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:32 lisa von drasek
5:33
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
I'm thinking your "power" status is helpful for readers who dream of and work toward being a writer as well.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:33 Deborah Baldwin
5:33
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
They will be real paintings (that are actually in other museums around the world) -- as opposed to the fictional painting in EGG.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:33 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:33
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
Not me, and not kids, but I wondered if it was a deliberate choice, to go ahead and be like, "reminders of death are all around us".
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:33 pwbalto
5:34
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Sarah: Yes! I was very out of touch with kid lit when I started writing EGG . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:34 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:34
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
And someone recommended WHEN YOU REACH ME. It was a big influence.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:34 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:34
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Bklyn'er: My kids are young, so it's hard to give total freedom, but . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:34 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:35
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I'll do things like let them ride their scooters to the end of the block and wait on the corner for me to catch up . ..
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:35 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:35
lisa von drasek: 
We haven't talked at all about Theo's economic situation as a driving force in the novel. Thoughts from the gallery?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:35 lisa von drasek
5:35
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
And so many times, an adult will stop and say, "whose children are these?!?!" as if they've been abandoned.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:35 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:35
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
And then I think about my father in law who grew up in Irish part of Queens, and was sent at age 5 to the pub with a bucket to bring home beer every day.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:35 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:35
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Different times. :-)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:35 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:36
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
@lisa - I LOVE the idea of an impoverished family living sub rosa in the Village. Wishful thinking on yr part Laura?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:36 pwbalto
5:37
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
pwbalto: I don't know if I was that profound when I was writing it. :-) Maybe it's just being a New Yorker and seeing so many things happen so quickly on the streets . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:37 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:37
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
pwbalto: Yes, somewhat! . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:37 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:37
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
I think Theo's economic situation is not so far from some kids today. Offers good perspective exploration and discussion opener.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:37 Deborah Baldwin
5:37
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
. . . The New Yorker in me refuses to feel sorry for Theo being left with a whole townhouse to manage . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:37 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:38
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I always felt: "The Tenpenny's own their real estate outright! That's the NYC dream!"
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:38 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:38
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
But seriously . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:38 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:38
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
The fact that the Tenpenny's owned their house really does divide Theo from the many truly impoverished children in NYC.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:38 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:39
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
And that's what gave Jack his independence. No matter what, he had a roof over his head. He just had to keep it there.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:39 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:40
lisa von drasek: 
If I was going to pick a director for the film it would be Wes Andersen.

Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:40 lisa von drasek
5:40
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
It's wild to have this kind of pioneer lifestyle smack dab in the middle of the city. Makes it kind of a May Amelia novel and Harriet the Spy rolled together.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:40 pwbalto
5:40
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Lisa: Yes, I can see that. It's the quirky shabby WASP lifestyle.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:40 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:41
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
pwbalto: I live in Brooklyn on the 6th floor with a balcony . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:41 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:41
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
and my balcony overlooks our neighbor's yard filled with chickens and a kitchen garden.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:41 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:41
[Comment From Bklyn’erBklyn’er: ] 
That "pioneer life style in the city" is similar to the spirit of Williamsburg. All those pickle makers!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:41 Bklyn’er
5:41
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
This urban homesteading thing is really taking off! But Jack started it out of necessity of course.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:41 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:42
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Bklyn'er: Oh yes. All of this was coming together when I was writing. . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:42 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:42
lisa von drasek: 
oh yes, I really miss the Farmacy in Carroll Gardens with its Brooklyn made goodies.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:42 lisa von drasek
5:42
[Comment From Bklyn’erBklyn’er: ] 
Gotta admit, I dream of having a supply of fresh eggs.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:42 Bklyn’er
5:42
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
I had 3' of sidewalk in Park Slope and I grew enough peppers to make hot sauce every year!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:42 pwbalto
5:42
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
And I think the crash of 2009 drove people to that even more. There was (still is?) a greater interest in self-sustainability, in the independence that comes from doing things yourself.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:42 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:43
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
(That said, I am the world's most hopeless homestead. Can't even put up shelves.)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:43 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:43
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Farmacy!!!!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:43 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:43
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I thought of having my book launch there, but did a bookstore instead.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:43 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:43
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
FYI: Farmacy is a fantastic, old fashioned soda counter that is also ridiculously local/organic/sustainable/etc.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:43 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:44
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
They make their own organic artisanal marischino cherries.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:44 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:44
lisa von drasek: 
http://brooklynfarmacy.blog...
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:44 lisa von drasek
5:44
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
Pit bulls ate my chickens here in Baltimore, I'll never do it again. Sorry for going OT Lisa!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:44 pwbalto
5:44
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Yikes!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:44 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:45
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I had a baby hawk land on our balcony once. Even the city is still the wild sometimes.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:45 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:45
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Went to the site and discovered Farmacy has a book coming ...
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:45 Nora - EarlyWord
5:45
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Ooooooh, now I can make my own mararschino cherries!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:45 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:45
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
(Please note: I will never make my own maraschino cherries.)
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:45 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:45
lisa von drasek: 
I think we all drifted a bit. Back to the book and Laura. I love reading first novels. I feel an ownership and discovery of an author. Laura, will you be doing any in person class visits? Do you Skype?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:45 lisa von drasek
 
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Thanks for getting us back on track -- sorry for adding to the distraction with that cover image!
  Nora - EarlyWord
5:45
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:45 
5:46
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
We have all the rural predators and the urban ones too. :(
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:46 pwbalto
5:46
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
YES! I love doing class/school visits, and I'm scheduling them now
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:46 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:46
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Skype as well
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:46 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:46
lisa von drasek: 
how would a librarian set up a visit from you?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:46 lisa von drasek
5:47
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I'm excited to announce that I'm building some exciting presentations that talk about art history discoveries that inspired the book . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:47 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:47
[Comment From pwbaltopwbalto: ] 
Yes Laura will you be at BEA.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:47 pwbalto
5:47
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
with lots and lots of great visuals . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:47 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:47
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Also bilding a presentation called Under the Egg: Fact vs. Fiction . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:47 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:47
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Will you be making it out to the Pacific Northwest?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:47 Deborah Baldwin
5:48
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
. . . that talks about what parts of the book were rooted in research, in stranger-than-fiction true stories, and what parts I fictionalized
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:48 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:48
lisa von drasek: 
In your research for the book, what was the most surprising thing that you learned?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:48 lisa von drasek
5:48
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
With the wonders of technology, I should be able to share these presentations even via Skype
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:48 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:49
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
To set up a visit, you can contact me directly via the Contact page on my website:
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:49 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:49
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
LauraMarxFitzgerald.com
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:49 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:49
lisa von drasek: 
was there anything cool that you found out but you edited out for length or that it didn't further the story?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:49 lisa von drasek
5:49
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Or contact Penguin's Young Reader's speakers division, and they will contact me as a go between
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:49 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:49
[Comment From MI LibrarianMI Librarian: ] 
Did your own kids influence the characters of Theo and Bodhi and if so, how"
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:49 MI Librarian
5:49
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Deborah: I would love to make it to the PNW! My parents spend every summer in Vancouver, so it wouldn't be hard to persuade me to join them.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:49 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:50
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Hmmm, Lisa, interesting questions . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:50 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:50
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Well, I don't know if this was cool . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:50 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:50
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
But in the original end of the story, Theo eats Artemisia the chicken for Thanksgiving dinner!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:50 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:51
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
My vegetarian editor was horrified
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:51 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:51
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
And begged me to spare her
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:51 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:51
lisa von drasek: 
thank your editor for me, please
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:51 lisa von drasek
5:51
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
So I relented. But really, I felt that Theo was a practical farm girl at heart and would not hesitate to put a fat hen on the table for dinner.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:51 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:51
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
lol, Lisa.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:51 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:52
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Yes, it was probably the right call!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:52 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:52
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
To be honest, my kids are NOTHING like Theo or Bodhi
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:52 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:52
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Bodhi was actually inspired by my college roommate.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:52 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:52
lisa von drasek: 
to the gallery... last questions for Laura
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:52 lisa von drasek
5:52
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
She wasn't the daughter of movie stars, but was from a wealthy family in California and had the same irreverence but up-for-anything optimism that Bodhi has.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:52 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:54
lisa von drasek: 
Laura, could you post that Raphael painting from yesterday?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:54 lisa von drasek
5:55
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Hold on:
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:55 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:55
lisa von drasek: 
Do you have a picture of yourself as a young girl?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:55 lisa von drasek
5:55
[Comment From MI LibrarianMI Librarian: ] 
Oh, wow -- of COURSE Bodhi would be based on someone other than your kids! Here's a dumb question -- why did you want to write a book and did you set out to write a middle grade book?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:55 MI Librarian
5:55
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
When is your next book due to be published?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:55 Deborah Baldwin
5:55
Laura Marx Fitzgerald
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:55 
5:56
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Funny story about this painting -- in the book, Lydon thinks this is the painting Theo has. It's been missing since the war, and is the most important missing painting in the world.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:56 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:56
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
It's a Raphael self portrait.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:56 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:56
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
But after my book was off to publication, it was reported found in an undisclosed Swiss bank vault!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:56 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:56
Laura Marx Fitzgerald
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:56 
5:57
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Here's me as a kid.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:57 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:57
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Wishing I could get back to a book.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:57 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:57
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Deborah: I think my book is due out next fall, but that depends on my getting my draft done on time . . . hmmmm . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:57 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:57
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
MI Librarian: I can't say I was always driving to write a middle grade book. . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:57 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:58
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
I just had an idea, and that idea was a middle grade idea!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:58 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:58
lisa von drasek: 
what were you reading when you were 9 and 10?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:58 lisa von drasek
5:58
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
But my mother would be horrified by any book with sex, drugs, drinking, or rock and roll, so I'll be writing MG for a while to come . . .
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:58 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:59
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
My favorite, favorite books in no particular order:
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:59
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
The Borrowers
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:59
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
All of a Kind Family series
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:59
[Comment From MI LibrarianMI Librarian: ] 
You look much happier today. Are you?
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 MI Librarian
5:59
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:59
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
The Westing Game
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:59
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Little House series
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
5:59
Nora - EarlyWord: 

Hurrah for THE BORROWERS!


Sorry to say, we're almost out of time.

Thanks so much, Laura and Lisa. And thanks to our participants for so many great questions.

Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 Nora - EarlyWord
5:59
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
MI Librarian: Yes, I am much happier now that I am a BPL Power User!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 5:59 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
6:00
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
This was so much fun! Thank you, everyone!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 6:00 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
6:00
lisa von drasek: 
Thanks for joining us today!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 6:00 lisa von drasek
6:00
[Comment From Deborah BaldwinDeborah Baldwin: ] 
Thank you!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 6:00 Deborah Baldwin
6:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Laura -- I didn't reveal this before, but I majored in Art History, so found your book particularly fun. Thanks for the insights.
Wednesday April 23, 2014 6:00 Nora - EarlyWord
6:00
Laura Marx Fitzgerald: 
Thanks, Nora!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 6:00 Laura Marx Fitzgerald
6:01
Nora - EarlyWord: 

This chat will be archived on the Penguin Young Readers page on EarlyWord:

http://penguinyrauthors.earlyword.com

Wednesday April 23, 2014 6:01 Nora - EarlyWord
6:01
[Comment From Jenna GoodallJenna Goodall: ] 
Thanks, Laura!
Wednesday April 23, 2014 6:01 Jenna Goodall
6:01
Nora - EarlyWord: 

If you enjoyed our chat with Laura, tell your colleagues about this program and look for the next book in the program,

The Last Wild by Piers Torday

Wednesday April 23, 2014 6:01 Nora - EarlyWord
 
 

FREE TICKETS For the Arbuthnot Lecture

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

There’s still time to reserve your free tickets to hear Andrea Davis Pinkney give this year’s Arbuthnot Lecture on Saturday, May 3rd at the University of Minnesota.

Arbuthnot

RSVP here, or by calling 612-626-9182.

An accompanying exhibit, Rejoice the Legacy! is open through May 14, 2014.

More information here.

Live Chat with Debut Author
Celeste Ng,

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

Our Live Chat has concluded. To sign up for the program and join future chats, go to the Penguin Debut Authors Program.

(more information here).

 Live Chat with Celeste Ng, EVERYTHING I NEVER TOLD YOU(03/26/2014) 
3:08
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Getting ready for our live online chat with Celeste Ng, author of EVERYTHING I NEVER TOLD YOU, coming from The Penguin Press in June.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 3:08 Nora - EarlyWord
3:08
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday March 26, 2014 3:08 
3:34
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Below is a special video that Celeste recorded to introduce herself to you...
Wednesday March 26, 2014 3:34 Nora - EarlyWord
3:42
Nora - EarlyWord: 
You are welcome to enter questions at any time. We will try to get to all of them in the hour. Don't worry about typos (and please forgive any on our part!)
Wednesday March 26, 2014 3:42 Nora - EarlyWord
3:43
Celeste: 
Hi everyone! I'm so excited to be here!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 3:43 Celeste
3:44
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Hey, Celeste! Glad to know you're in the house. We'll begin chatting in about 15 minutes.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 3:44 Nora - EarlyWord
3:45
Celeste: 
Looking forward to it!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 3:45 Celeste
4:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
HI Everyone -- we're ready to start!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:00 Nora - EarlyWord
4:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Unfortunately, it seems the comment section is running slow...
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:00 Nora - EarlyWord
4:01
Nora - EarlyWord: 
If comments are not coming through, I may ask you to email me.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:01 Nora - EarlyWord
4:01
Nora - EarlyWord: 
But, let's get started. Welcome, Celeste!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:01 Nora - EarlyWord
4:02
Celeste: 
Thanks, Nora! And hi, everyone!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:02 Celeste
4:02
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I see some people gathered -- please say hi to Celeste!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:02 Nora - EarlyWord
4:04
Nora - EarlyWord: 
OK -- I don't see any comments coming through, so there may be a problem. You can email questions an comments to me -- Nora AT EarlyWord DOT com.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:04 Nora - EarlyWord
4:04
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Let's start with an advance question about your intro video.

One of our program members wants to know how you created that great painting based on the Annie Dillard quote. She says she wants to do her own version of one of her favorite quotes.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:04 Nora - EarlyWord
4:05
Celeste: 
Oh, thank you! I'm happy to tell you how I did the painting.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:05 Celeste
4:05
Nora - EarlyWord
Celeste's Image of a Quote from Annie Dillard
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:05 
4:05
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Here's what it looks like...
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:05 Nora - EarlyWord
4:05
Celeste: 
The painting was inspired by the work of an artist called Lauren DiCioccio (http://laurendicioccio.com), who lays clear plastic over pages from magazines and covers the letters with tiny dots of paint.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:05 Celeste
4:05
Celeste: 
I wanted to use a quote that had special meaning to me and make it beautiful.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:05 Celeste
4:05
Celeste: 
I wrote the quote out on the canvas very lightly, in pencil. Then I got 26 different colors of paint and assigned each letter a color--
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:05 Celeste
4:06
Nora - EarlyWord: 
oops - a bunch of greetings just came in -- will post them...
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:06 Nora - EarlyWord
4:06
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
Good afternoon from the Midwest; looking forward to the chat session
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:06 Lucy
 
Celeste: 
Hi Lucy! Nice to meet you!
  Celeste
4:06
Celeste: 
And then I made a blotch of paint over each letter, using the appropriate color. So if you look REALLY closely, you can see the letters very faintly beneath the paint.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:06 Celeste
4:06
[Comment From Sue DSue D: ] 
Hello - I really enjoyed the video Celeste created. My kids horned in and asked me to play it again. They enjoyed it too!!!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:06 Sue D
 
Celeste: 
Ha! Thank you, Sue! So glad you (and your kids) enjoyed it.
  Celeste
4:06
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
HI, Celeste
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:06 Lucy
4:06
[Comment From AnneAnne: ] 
Hi Celeste -
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:06 Anne
 
Celeste: 
Hi Anne--welcome and thank you for coming!
  Celeste
4:06
[Comment From CatherineCatherine: ] 
Glad to join you for this author chat! Can't seem to log in to twitter.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:06 Catherine
4:07
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Sue -- sounds like you have some very cool kids!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:07 Nora - EarlyWord
4:08
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Celeste -- I love the telling details in your book, like the heartbreaking moment when Hannah reaches for her mother’s hand and she doesn’t see it. How did you develop that? Is it natural, or did you consciously work on it?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:08 Nora - EarlyWord
4:08
Celeste: 
I've always been drawn to details, and in fact they've always been a big pat of my writing.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:08 Celeste
4:08
Celeste: 
My early stories were probably about 98% detail and 2% plot.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:08 Celeste
4:08
Celeste: 
I've always felt that details aren't just "details"--in a lot of ways, they *are* the story.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:08 Celeste
4:09
Celeste: 
And details help especially with writing about children--those details reveal what they may not be able to verbalize.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:09 Celeste
4:10
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I found it especially effective in portraying children -- it's those details that reveal what they may not be able to verbalize.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:10 Nora - EarlyWord
4:10
Celeste: 
Yes, *exactly!*
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:10 Celeste
4:10
Celeste: 
Those details can put us right into a child's mind.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:10 Celeste
4:11
Nora - EarlyWord: 
And then, for adults, sometimes what we articulate is not what we really feel!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:11 Nora - EarlyWord
4:11
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Another advance question about the video -- from Boston Librarian:

Tell us about the “major structural” changes you mention in the video.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:11 Nora - EarlyWord
4:12
Celeste: 
The first draft of the book was in multiple parts--
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:12 Celeste
4:12
Celeste: 
2 chapters in one time period, then 3 chapters of Marilyn in college, then 3 chapters of James in college, etc.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:12 Celeste
4:12
Celeste: 
That didn't work, so I tried braiding the timelines together--
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:12 Celeste
4:12
Celeste: 
And it took me a long time to figure out how to move back and forth in time, so that past and present made sense together.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:12 Celeste
4:13
Celeste: 
Was that not clear from the diagram? :)
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:13 Celeste
4:13
Celeste: 
(I'm looking at it now, and it kind of bewilders ME...)
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:13 Celeste
4:13
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I'm afraid that the Legal Seafood Menu was much clearer!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:13 Nora - EarlyWord
4:13
[Comment From CatherineCatherine: ] 
As the title suggests, the characters have trouble verbalizing their thoughts and communicating with each other.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:13 Catherine
 
Celeste: 
Catherine, that's a great point--there's so much that these characters leave unsaid, to each other and to themselves.
  Celeste
4:14
Celeste: 
While writing the novel, I kept asking other writers what they'd done, and got vague answers. Now I understand why--we're all just muddling around until things click into place.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:14 Celeste
4:14
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Did you realize you needed to make that change, or did it come from your editor.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:14 Nora - EarlyWord
4:14
Celeste: 
I realized it. The parts of the story weren't coming together the way I wanted them to.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:14 Celeste
4:15
Celeste: 
Fortunately, when I thought I'd gotten it right, my editor agreed!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:15 Celeste
4:15
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I like Catherine's comment about the title. How did you come up with it?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:15 Nora - EarlyWord
4:16
Celeste: 
It came to me in the first draft, as I was roughing out the final scene--it's an echo of one of the final lines of the book.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:16 Celeste
4:16
Celeste: 
It struck me that it really applied to the whole book, and might work as a title.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:16 Celeste
4:16
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I was wondering, as a parent, how are you able to write about something as horrible as a child disappearing. Didn't it scare you?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:16 Nora - EarlyWord
4:17
Celeste: 
It terrified me!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:17 Celeste
4:17
Celeste: 
But that's usually my approach to writing-- I often find myself writing about the things that scare me most.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:17 Celeste
4:17
Celeste: 
It's almost a way of exploring things I hope never to experience in real life. "What would this be like? How would I respond?"
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:17 Celeste
4:17
Celeste: 
I think that often, we write (and read) about horrible things, as a way of stretching ourselves emotionally without going through the experience--an empathy exercise.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:17 Celeste
4:18
Nora - EarlyWord: 
That may also be why we are willing to read books that scare us in some way.

What else have you written?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:18 Nora - EarlyWord
4:18
[Comment From CatherineCatherine: ] 
I think you're quite brave, Celeste, to examine the things that many of us would prefer not to think about.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:18 Catherine
 
Celeste: 
Thank you, Catherine. I'm always happy when readers are willing to read books about things that scare *them*, as well.
  Celeste
4:19
Celeste: 
I've written a bunch of short stories, and some essays--all of which fall under the same category of "exploring things that scare me."
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:19 Celeste
4:19
Celeste: 
And two extremely awful "novels," when I was about 13 and 15, which are consigned to a locked file cabinet.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:19 Celeste
4:20
Nora - EarlyWord: 
How did you get this one published?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:20 Nora - EarlyWord
4:20
Celeste: 
My route was pretty traditional: I started it in grad school, worked on it for 6 years while holding various strange, ill-paying jobs--
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:20 Celeste
4:21
Celeste: 
And then, when it was finished, my agent was able to sell it to the Penguin Press. I was very lucky, in short.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:21 Celeste
4:21
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
Were those early novels also explorations of things which scared you?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:21 Lucy
 
Celeste: 
Lucy, they weren't--they were more fantasy/wish fulfillment, like "What if I lived in Colonial America?" (which I thought was a cool time period, at 13). That's one of many reasons they didn't work, I think. :)
  Celeste
4:23
[Comment From A First Flights MemberA First Flights Member: ] 
I found these charachters staying with me and that I was thinking about them long after I had closed the book. Have they stayed with you?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:23 A First Flights Member
 
Celeste: 
Thank you--what a kind thing to say! I'm so glad to hear that. They *have* stayed with me; it's hard to spend 6 years with anyone and not have them work their way into your brain on some level.
  Celeste
Celeste: 
I do miss them, now that the book is done.
  Celeste
4:23
[Comment From CatherineCatherine: ] 
I experienced a very palpable sense of sadness reading this novel. The lost dreams and potential--and the issues of abandonment, alienation, and otherness--really got to me. There's a lot in this story for readers to relate to.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:23 Catherine
 
Celeste: 
Thank you, Catherine (or perhaps I should say, I'm sorry). One of the things I hope the book will do is get readers thinking about otherness, and alienation, and what it's like to be an outsider in some way.
  Celeste
4:24
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I agree, Catherine. I was very moved by another telling detail; the quotes Marilyn had marked in her mother's cookbook and what it said about her. Where did THAT come from, Celeste?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:24 Nora - EarlyWord
4:25
Celeste: 
The cookbook itself is based on my mother's own Betty Crocker cookbook from the 1960s-- which actually had all of that commentary in its recipes. I didn't make those up.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:25 Celeste
4:25
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I wondered if you had made them up, but we have proof that you didn't...
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:25 Nora - EarlyWord
4:26
Celeste: 
I saw them one day while idly flipping through the cookbook, and they just stuck with me. Eventually they found their way into the novel.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:26 Celeste
4:26
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:26 
4:26
Nora - EarlyWord: 
That word "behooves" just kills me!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:26 Nora - EarlyWord
4:26
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Here's the one about preserves...
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:26 Nora - EarlyWord
4:26
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:26 
4:27
Celeste: 
Those quotes really startled me. And they were all throughout the cookbook--which came out in 1968, by the way. (I backdated it for the novel, so that Marilyn's mother could have it.)
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:27 Celeste
4:27
Nora - EarlyWord: 
And here's the cover of the book -- some of you may still have it in your libraries!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:27 Nora - EarlyWord
4:27
Celeste: 
We tend to think that the era when women were expected to just cook and sew for their families was long ago--but it wasn't actually that long ago. Just a generation or two ago... It's so easy to forget that.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:27 Celeste
4:27
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:27 
4:28
Celeste: 
It's strange to say, I actually adore that cookbook. It represents a lot of things that bother me deeply, but at the same time, it belongs to my mother's. It's a complicated object with a complicated personal history.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:28 Celeste
4:28
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Amazing that it came out in 1968 -- that summer students were getting their heads beat in for protesting the war in Chicago -- such disparate strains in the culture at the time!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:28 Nora - EarlyWord
4:28
[Comment From LucyLucy: ] 
I have a copy of this edition in my kitchen and still use it :-)
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:28 Lucy
 
Celeste: 
My mom still uses hers! In fact she won't let me have it because she still uses it as a reference.
  Celeste
4:28
[Comment From CatherineCatherine: ] 
I had one of those Betty Crocker cookbooks and thought it was the bible--it was a required textbook for a home economics class I took in high school!
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:28 Catherine
4:29
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I was wondering about the use of the term "Oriental" in your book. It's a fraught term, but of that time. Did you feel strange using it?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:29 Nora - EarlyWord
4:29
[Comment From AndreaAndrea: ] 
I still use my Betty Crocker book. It doesn't have quotes in in , but I did find a four-leaf clover. Perhaps I was hoping it would bring me good luck since my mother really never taught me to cook.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:29 Andrea
 
Celeste: 
Andrea, I love that story.
  Celeste
4:29
Celeste: 
I did feel strange using the term "Oriental." It's a complicated term, as you point out, and not one I use myself...
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:29 Celeste
4:29
Celeste: 
But it would have been inaccurate to use the term "Asian," as we might today.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:29 Celeste
4:29
Celeste: 
And in many ways I also wanted to startle the reader, to jolt them by using a term we don't see much now, as a way of asking them to think about its usage and its implications.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:29 Celeste
4:30
Nora - EarlyWord: 
That also makes me wonder why you chose this particular time period. You're too young to have known it personally.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:30 Nora - EarlyWord
4:31
Celeste: 
Yes, I grew up in the 1980s--so I was *just* after this time period. But my family lived through it, and my childhood was really colored by that experience.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:31 Celeste
4:31
Celeste: 
It was the right time period to explore some of the issues I saw this family grappling with--race and ethnicity, being in a "mixed" marriage, women's roles and opportunities.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:31 Celeste
4:31
Celeste: 
And I was surprised, in writing the novel, how much of the '70s in particular had carried into my childhood: we had rotary phones, record players, all of that. Maybe my family was a throwback? It didn't feel foreign to me.
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:31 Celeste
4:33
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I wonder if some people identify with their parents' time periods more than with their own?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:33 Nora - EarlyWord
4:34
What time period do you feel shaped you?
The one I grew up in
 ( 33% )
My parents' time period
 ( 0% )
Both
 ( 50% )
None; I am my own person
 ( 17% )

Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:34 
4:34
[Comment From AndreaAndrea: ] 
First lines are critically important to engage the reader. Did you always have the first line or did it come to you later in the writing process?
Wednesday March 26, 2014 4:34 Andrea
 
Celeste: 
The first line came in the last draft, actually!
  Celeste
Celeste: 
The original first line was "At first they don't know where Lydia has gone."
  Celeste
Celeste: 
But in the last draft, I wanted it to be more decisive, and to not withhold information from the reader.