Archive for the ‘Childrens and YA’ Category

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues., Aug. 21st

Monday, August 20th, 2018

This session of YA/MG GalleyChat has now ended. Read the tweets below.

Join us for the next on on Wed., Sept. 26, 2:30 to 3:30 pm. ET (2:00 for virtual cocktails). #ewgcya

Bring a friend!

YA/MG GalleyChat, Mon., July 16

Monday, July 16th, 2018

Below are the tweets from Monday’s #ewgcya.

Joins us for the next chat, Tues., Aug. 21, 2:30 to 3:30 pm. ET (2:00 for virtual cocktails).

YA/MG GalleyChat Roundup

Friday, May 18th, 2018

Link here for the titles that librarians buzzed during Wednesday’s YA/MG GalleyChat, #ewgcya.

Join us for the next chat on Thursday, May 16, 2:30 to 3:30 pm. ET (2:00 for virtual cocktails). #ewgcya

Bring a friend!

YA/MG GalleyChat Discoveries

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018

Spotted on a photo of a stack of ARCs posted during the February’s YA/MG GalleyChat, is a new title by the author of the Morris Award finalist, Dear Martin. According to the ARC, Nic Stone’s second book Odd One Out is scheduled for release this fall, but there’s no information about it yet on retail or wholesale sites.

A few days after GalleyChat, the title was featured on a BuzzFeed list titled “Don’t Miss These Fantastic YA Books By Black Authors That Release This Year,” with the annotation, “The New York Times bestselling author of 2017’s Dear Martin pens another YA about three teens struggling through love, heartbreak, and the real deal. It sounds very diverse with both POC and LGBT representation, and we can’t wait to read it when it’s out in October! Pre-order links aren’t yet live for this one, but keep checking back here for future updates!”

In the ARC’s Author’s Note, Stone tells readers that she wrote this book because it is one she needed when she was twelve, before she realized the meaning of her “attractions to other women,” and marying her “dream man.”

Tell us about your latest discoveries (and make some of your own) during the next YA/MG GalleyChat on Monday, March 26th, 3 to 4 pm, ET (2:30 for virtual cocktails). #ewgcya

Lisa Von Drasek Picks Best Kids Books 2017

Friday, December 22nd, 2017

Self-confessed childrens books “big mouth,” Lisa Von Drasek, Curator of the Children’s Literature Research Collections.at the U. of Minn., and former EW Kids Correspondent, appeared recently on Minnesota Public Radio to discuss the best kids books of 2017. She is joined by St. Paul indie bookseller, Holly Weinkauf from the Red Balloon Bookshop. It’s worth a listen just for the infectious joy in their voices, not to mention the books they’ll make you want to pick up immediately. Lisa notes that they “discussed fifty-five books in less than an hour and didn’t even get to every one that we brought with us.” For the complete list go to No Kidding: The Best Kids’ Books to Give This Holiday Season.

They highlight cookbooks, giving special praise to Pizza, from Phaidon’s Cook in Book series, interactive titles that allow kids to virtually create recipes from scratch.

Lisa is blogging at the Blue Ox Review, the site she recently founded to “review books, give a heads up on upcoming titles that I am excited about, link to interesting news and events, and show off cool stuff from my collection. Of course, there will be an occasional rant.”

On the site, she is doing her annual “Books to give kids you don’t know very well,” (archive here) to help booksellers and librarians navigate the “maddening game” of recommending the exactly perfect gift for kids customers may see only once a year:

Best Books 2017: Read Alouds

Lets Get Started- For twos, threes, and fours

 

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues. Dec. 19

Tuesday, December 19th, 2017

Join us for the next YA/MG GalleyChat on Wed., Jan. 17, 3 to 4 pm, ET (2:30 for virtual cocktails). #ewgcya

A list of titles discussed is here (use it to discover e-galleys to download).

Adaptations Update; Sequel Mania

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

The two big winners from last week’s Emmy Awards, HBO’s Big Little Lies and Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale are both based on self-contained books, making the highly desired sequels problematic. Nevertheless, the producers are working with the authors to come up with new storylines. Liane Moriarity has only admitted to “thinking about” a followup to Lies, but Deadline reports on rumors that she has written a novella to serve as the basis for a sequel.

There’s no such coyness about Handmaids Tale. Production on season two has already begun and is expected to wrap in February. Author Margaret Atwood, who celebrated with the crew during the Emmy ceremony, is heavily involved with the new season.

Two film sequels will compete this weekend to knock the surprise hit, Stephen King’s It out of first place at the box office. Kingsman: The Golden Circle, the second in the film franchise based on Mark Millar and Dave Gibbons’ comics series The Secret Service, opens in 3,900 theaters, as does the family film, The LEGO Ninjago Movie. Several tie-ins to the latter are available from Scholastic and DK; see our tie-ins list here.

Opening in just NY and LA advance of a wider run is Judi Dench in round two as Queen Victoria, this time in Victoria & Abdul. Dench also appears briefly in the new trailer for Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, to open Nov. 11. The actress is not suffering from a lack of offers. It was also announced this week that she is considering a role in another adaptation to be directed by Branagh, of Eion Colfer’s Artemis Fowl, now with a release date of Aug. 9, 2019.

Not a sequel, but the English-language version of a Swedish hit, A Man Called Ove, based on the best-seller by Fredrik Backman, is in the works and Tom Hanks has signed to play the lead.

Several new trailers were released in the last week, including the first for a new adaptation of Beatrix Potter’s Peter Rabbit, indicating that the movie will have little in common with the original, other than the characters’ names.

For a full rundown of upcoming adaptations, download our Movies & TV Based on Book spreadsheet. To browse the recent updates, download EarlyWord-Books-to-Movies-UPDATES-—-Sept-15-thru-21-2017

We want to thank Elisabeth Gattullo Marrocolla for her encouraging shout-out to EarlyWord‘s adaptations coverage on the ALSC blog this week. Thanks to comments like hers, we intend to continue our regular updates.

YA/MG GalleyChat, Tues. Sept. 19

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

Librarians chat about the YA and Middle Grade galleys they are rereading. See TweetChat below.

The Breakfast Club Meets Murder Mystery

Sunday, July 2nd, 2017

Making its debut at No.5 on the NYT Young Adult Hardcover list this week is One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus (PRH/Delacorte Press; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample),

Calling it “The Breakfast Club meets murder mystery,” Entertainment Weekly gives it a B+ and says “McManus knows how to plot out a mystery, but the real charm of the novel lies in the journey each of the characters goes on … [a] pretty stellar summer read.”

Kirkus says the “fast-paced blend of Gossip Girl, Pretty Little Liars, and classic John Hughes will leave readers racing to the finish as they try to unravel the mystery on their own.”

It has made a number of lists.

Seventeen names it “20 of the Best YA Books of 2017.”

Entertainment Weekly puts it on three of their lists:

Bustle lists it three times as well:

Holds at most libraries we checked are topping 3:1.

PADDINGTON BEAR Creator Dies

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

His bear traveled from “darkest Peru” to London, from the 1958 chapter book A Bear Called Paddington to a series of 13 more novels, multiple picture books and the big screen. Creator Michael Bond died at 91 on Tuesday.

In a 2007 interview in the Telegraph, Bond sai the little bear helped him deal with dark times.

The most recent in the chapter book series, Paddington’s Finest Hour (HarperCollins) will be published in the US on September 13th.

The second Paddington movie is expected arrive in theaters later this year.

Green’s TURTLES

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

As promised, John Green devoted yesterday’s vlogbrothers video to his forthcoming book, Turtles All the Way Down (PRH/Dutton YR; Oct 10; cover art to come), his first novel since 2012’s The Fault in Our Stars.

He doesn’t reveal anything about the book’s content, talking instead about the special ISBN for signed copies, causing pre-orders for that edition to spike. Along the way, he explains what ISBN’s are, knowledge he gained while working at Booklist.

John Green, New Novel

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Turtles All the Way Down is the title of John Green’s next YA novel, (PRH/Dutton Books for Young Readers; 9780525555360; cover not finalized) releasing on October 10. It is his first novel in six years, following 2012’s The Fault in Our Stars.

Entertainment Weekly reports it is “the story of 16-year-old Aza Holmes, a young woman who grapples with mental illness while investigating the disappearance of a fugitive billionaire.”

Green says “This is my first attempt to write directly about the kind of mental illness that has affected my life since childhood, so while the story is fictional, it is also quite personal.”

He announced the book on Twitter in a very brief notice.

The title refers to a story which Stephen Hawking relates in A Brief History of Time. Faced with the theory that the world is flat, held on the back of a turtle, a famous astronomer asks what the turtle stands on. The answer reveals the illogic of the theory, “But it’s turtles all the way down!”

It’s just one of many metaphors readers can expect, according to the Penguin’s UK site, quoting Green, “The great thing about figurative language and symbols and the like in novels is that you don’t have to be conscious of them for them to work.”

UPDATE: Green talks about the book in a bonus Vlogbrothers video, below. He invites viewers to post questions about it and promises to try to answer them on his next video, scheduled for Tuesday, June 27.

Dog Finds Man

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

A stray dog nabs herself a multi book and movie deal.

A tiny but hardy pup, approached ultra-marathoner Dion Leonard during a long distance race in China across part of the Gobi Desert. She stayed with him, running nearly 80 miles. Leonard named her after the desert.

Her story, and his, gets even more dramatic. Once the run was over Gobi disappeared in a Chinese city while Leonard was raising funds to adopt her and take her back to his home in Scotland. An international effort launched on the Internet helped find her, hurt but ultimately OK.

He says that he has no idea why she came to him in the wilderness, “whether it was my smell — we don’t shower during the week in these races — or whether it was something else, whether it was a past life connection. It was definitely fate and I’m so glad that she chose me … she’s brought lots of joy to people around the globe with our story.”

That story is captured in Finding Gobi: A Little Dog with a Very Big Heart by Dion Leonard with Craig Borlase (HC/Thomas Nelson, June 13; Thomas Nelson Audio; OverDrive Sample).

Coming August 9 are YA and children’s versions:

 

 

 

 

 

Finding Gobi: Young Reader’s Edition: The True Story of One Little Dog’s Big Journey by Dion Leonard, adapted by Aaron Rosenberg (HC/Thomas Nelson).

Gobi: A Little Dog with a Big Heart by Dion Leonard, illustrated by Lisa Manuzak (HC/Thomas Nelson).

A board book comes out in early 2018, Gobi for Little Ones: The Race for Home by Dion Leonard, illustrated by Lisa Manuzak (HC/Thomas Nelson).

Twentieth Century Fox is developing the movie. Variety reports the studio “has preemptively acquired the film rights to the book.”

A portion of the proceeds from Leonard’s book will go to help other dogs in China.

To Movies: DAY THE CRAYONS QUIT

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

After 207 weeks on the NYT Picture Book Best Seller list and counting, Sony announces that they will adapt the 40-page picture book, The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt, illus. by Oliver Jeffers (Penguin Young Readers/ Philomel) into a feature filmDeadline reports that it is “envisioned as a live-action/animation hybrid.”

Described by Deadline as being about “a box of crayons whose inhabitants go on strike against their young owner after growing sick of how they’re being used, as their individual colors dictate very limited day-to-day existences for each crayon,” it’s not mentioned how fraught assumptions about color can be, as Betsy Bird explored in a post on her SLJ blog, Fuse Eight.

Dahl’s Dishes

Monday, June 19th, 2017

Everlasting gobstoppers, Fizzy Lifting Drink, Sugar flower teacups, each is a part of Willy Wonka’s amazing chocolate factory.

As NPR’s The Salt points out, these sweet concoctions are just a fraction of Roald Dahl’s culinary imagination. He also thought of giant chocolate cakes baked with blood and sweat (from Matilda) and doughnuts stuffed with goose-liver paste (Fantastic Mr. Fox).

Lucy Dahl joins the show to talk about how her dad filled her childhood with fantasies about food, claiming that the Queen sent the Dahls red cabbage from her very own garden or that the quail eggs they ate at breakfast really belonged to the Minpins who lived in the woods behind their house.

Dahl’s interest in food was not just literary. He saw treats as a way to instill magic in his children’s lives, waking them up at night to share chocolate and creating midnight feats they would consume after they walked in the woods in their pajamas looking for badgers, fortified by hot chocolate and cookies consumed on the way.

After Dahl died his family published a cookbook in 1997 as an homage to his focus on food, Roald Dahl’s Revolting Recipes (PRH/Puffin). Some of the dishes include Snozzcumbers and Crispy Wasp Stings on a Piece of Buttered Toast.

The Salt also takes some of Dahl’s iconic foods into the kitchen and with the help of Andrew Rea, the host of the YouTube show Binging With Babish, creates the giant cake from Matilda (warning, don’t watch if you are eating – or about to eat).