EarlyWord

News for Collection Development and Readers Advisory Librarians

A Different Kind of Author Tour

Bestselling author JD Vance and AOL co-founder Steve Case will travel together this fall reports USA Today, on the next wave of the Rise of the Rest program, a “campaign to drum up interest in tech start-ups not based in Silicon Valley, New York, Boston, Seattle and other coastal tech hubs.”

This is the fourth year of the project dreamed up by Case, although it is the first for Vance. After a whirlwind visit and a series of pitch meetings, Case invests $100,000 in one local start-up. Thus far he has visited 26 cities.

“The data is the data and last year the (National Venture Capital Association) said that 75% of venture capital went to just three states: California, New York and Massachusetts,” Case told the paper. His venture capital firm started the Rise of the Rest program to help correct that by identifying and supporting start-ups across the Rust Belt and Midwest.

Vance’s bestselling book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis (Harper; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample) is currently #7 on the NYT Hardback Nonfiction list after 47 straight weeks. Film rights have been acquired as well. The memoir arrived as the presidential campaign was heating up. The media embraced Vance’s sympathetic portrait of life in the Rust Belt as an explanation for the deep divides that drove the election.

FOUNDATION To TV

Isaac Asimov’s science fiction Foundation Trilogy may be headed to TV reports Deadline Hollywood. Skydance Television, the production company behind the new Star Trek films and World War Z, is helming a possible project.

This is not the first attempt to translate the books to screen. Den of Geek writes that as recently as 2014 HBO took a crack at it and Deadline adds “the guys who greenlit The Lord Of The Rings films [as well as] Independence Day director Roland Emmerich” have tried as well.

This time the team includes showrunners and screenwriters who have worked on the Dark Knight trilogy and Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles.

According to Deadline the main reasons no one has been able to adapt the series yet is their sprawling nature, involving many characters and plots and because George Lucas drew on them so heavily for Star Wars “the challenge is to not appear to be ripping off one of Hollywood’s most successful film franchises, even though Asimov wrote his books 75 years ago.”

The Foundation Trilogyan iconic piece of science fiction, won the 1966 Hugo Award for Best All-Time Series, beating out Lord of the Rings, even though, as io9 reports, many thought the category was invented specifically to honor that title.

io9 posted a guide to the books back when they thought HBO would make the series. Their primer is still useful for anyone who needs to get up to speed on the story. Both trade paperback and mass market editions are still in print (PRH/Spectra).

PADDINGTON BEAR Creator Dies

His bear traveled from “darkest Peru” to London, from the 1958 chapter book A Bear Called Paddington to a series of 13 more novels, multiple picture books and the big screen. Creator Michael Bond died at 91 on Tuesday.

In a 2007 interview in the Telegraph, Bond sai the little bear helped him deal with dark times.

The most recent in the chapter book series, Paddington’s Finest Hour (HarperCollins) will be published in the US on September 13th.

The second Paddington movie is expected arrive in theaters later this year.

Green’s TURTLES

As promised, John Green devoted yesterday’s vlogbrothers video to his forthcoming book, Turtles All the Way Down (PRH/Dutton YR; Oct 10; cover art to come), his first novel since 2012’s The Fault in Our Stars.

He doesn’t reveal anything about the book’s content, talking instead about the special ISBN for signed copies, causing pre-orders for that edition to spike. Along the way, he explains what ISBN’s are, knowledge he gained while working at Booklist.

Westward Ho With a Fresh Air Bump

The Best Land Under Heaven: The Donner Party in the Age of Manifest Destiny by Michael Wallis (Norton/Liveright; OverDrive Sample) is moving up the Amazon charts, currently at #62 from #9,956, thanks to a feature on NPR’s Fresh Air.

The struggling Donner Party is known for restoring to cannibalism to survive, but Wallis says “there’s so much more. That’s why I wanted to tell the back story.”

Wallis details the hardships of the journey and how they broke the members of the party down, both physically and psychologically. Sadly, many of their problems came from their own errors, such as packing too much, taking the wrong route, misjudging the weather, and assuming too much while knowing too little.

On what can be learned from their story, Wallis says “I think it tells us not only about the American West but really about the whole nation … Those of us who do not learn our history are doomed to repeat it … The words that ring out to me continually are two words that combined can be very fatal, then as now, and those words are: ignorance and arrogance.”

True West reviews the book in an illustrated account, writing it “will be considered for many years the primary volume for students and scholars seeking a detailed and well-annotated history of the tragic tale of emigration on the Overland Trail to California.”

PW stars it, writing Wallis “reclaims the horrific story of the infamously ill-fated wagon train from the annals of sensationalism.”

More Martin

In addition to the GOT spinoffs, another George R.R. Martin adaptation is in the works. The Syfy channel just greenlighted a pilot based on his supernatural 1980 novella Nightflyers.

A team is “setting up a writers room to generate backup scripts in preparation for a potential series pickup,” reports Deadline Hollywood. The pilot script is being written by Jeff Buhler, known for the horror films The Midnight Meat Train and the upcoming remake of Jacob’s Ladder.

Variety describes the story as following “eight maverick scientists and a powerful telepath who embark on an expedition to the edge of our solar system in the hopes of contacting alien life. They travel aboard The Nightflyer – a ship with a small tightknit crew and a reclusive captain. But when terrifying and violent events begin to take place they start to question each other, and surviving the journey proves harder than anyone thought.”

The Nerdist adds “After all, if the night is dark and full of terrors, just imagine what untold horrors lie in the inky blackness of space.”

On his blog, Martin says it is “one of my SF/ horror hybrids … a favorite of mine (especially the longer version that I did for BINARY STARS), and I think the show could have a lot of potential… especially if you like a little horror in your SF.”

The novella was adapted into what Den of Geek calls “a schlocky, limited-releasefilm in 1987. The novella itself is collected in Martin’s 1985 Nightflyers, now out of print.

Martin, who has an exclusive contract with HBO, is not involved with this new project.

Gold Rush

James Ledbetter, author of One Nation Under Gold: How One Precious Metal Has Dominated the American Imagination for Four Centuries (Norton/Liveright; HighBridge Audio; OverDrive Sample), spoke on NPR’s Fresh Air about the ways gold has been perceived through American history.

The discussion covers the history of money in the US and the many different currencies that were used in the early days, including those issued by states and banks issued and even from other countries. The conversation also covers the role of the Gold Rush in monetary policy, the creation of Fort Knox, and the period of time when citizens had to turn in their gold to the government. In more recent times, there was even a 20th century alchemy quest to create more gold, called Operation Goldfinger.

NPR’s Dave Davies, filling in for host Terry Gross, says the book further details how gold became “a symbol of permanence and quality and most of all a store of value.”

Dunkirk Set to Storm Theaters

The WWII movie Dunkirk opens on July 21. Directed by Christopher Nolan, known for creating major blockbusters, including his Batman trilogy, starring Fionn Whitehead, Tom Glynn-Carney, Jack Lowden, Harry Styles, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy, Mark Rylance, and Tom Hardy. The Hollywood Reporter calls it “one of the most anticipated movies of summer.”

IndieWire has a rundown of elements to watch for and things to note, including Nolan’s telling the Associated Press that “Dunkirk is not a war film. It’s a survival story and first and foremost a suspense film.”

    

Although not based on a specific book, several tie-ins are being published including the lead title, Dunkirk: The History Behind the Major Motion Picture by Joshua Levine (HarperCollins/Morrow Paperbacks; HarperAudio; also in Mass Market; OverDrive Sample), followed by Dunkirk, the screenplay by Christopher Nolan (IPG/Faber & Faber) and the coffee table book, The Making of Dunkirk by James Mottram, with a forward by the director (S&S/Insight Editions).

Coincidentally, Michael Korda’s upcoming book is also about the battle,  Alone: Britain, Churchill, and Dunkirk: Defeat Into Victory (Norton/Liveright, forthcoming Sept. 19).

More on ORIGIN

Announced last October, some details emerged today about Dan Brown’s upcoming book, Origin (PRH/Doubleday; Random House Large Print; Random House/BOT Audio; 10/3/17), the fifth in his Robert Langdon series.

The cover has been revealed, along with a trailer. The few hints about that the book is set in four cities in Spain has brought speculation. The LA Times writes, “Bilbao is home to a Guggenheim Museum, which seems certain to play a role in the novel — [Brown’s] Langdon character is a Harvard professor of symbology, and previous books have taken him to the Louvre (The Da Vinci Code) and the Museum of Palazzo Vecchio (Inferno).” Cue the hordes of tourists.

Entertainment Weekly adds that this book will offer a new twist on Brown’s usual mix of codes, religion and art. This time the art “will be modern, and the science will focus on cutting-edge technology.”

ALA BookClub Launch

Celebrity power makes for a successful start of the new ALA BookClub Central program.

Actress and book lover Sarah Jessica Parker announced the first title, No One Is Coming to Save Us by Stephanie Powell Watts (HarperCollins/Ecco; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample), on ABC’s Good Morning America, saying “there is much to praise about this very special book.” Parker also promoted the program and her role as honorary chair of the initiative on her Instagram page.

The debut novel is rising on Amazon, moving from #451 to #16 [UPDATE: as of 2 pm, ET, it’s moved to #9], within range of the just-announced Oprah pick, Behold the Dreamers, which is at #2.

Holds are building in several libraries.

Bustle also reports on the news, writing “the first book selection needs to be at the top of your summer TBR list.” Parade also writes about it.

In a press release Parker says “No One is Coming to Save Us marks the arrival of a wonderfully gifted new American writer. JJ, Ava, and Sylvia are easy characters to fall in love with, and Stephanie Powell Watts brings them to life with warmth and generosity. I can’t wait to share their story, their search for fulfillment and attempts to better understand their past and shape their future, with readers everywhere, and I’m jealous of all who will open to page one for the first time.”

The book got attention when it first published, making a number of most anticipated lists and getting reviewed by the NYT, The Washington Post, and USA Today, and being featured on NPR’s All Things Considered.

Parker is also launching a new imprint, SJP for Hogarth, in 2018, a project, reports Parade, that grew from her overwhelming reaction to Anthony Mara’s A Constellation of Vital Phenomena.

GALLEYCHATTER, June 2017, BookExpo SPECIAL EDITION

Editors Note: Each month, librarians gather for our online GalleyChats to talk about their favorite forthcoming titles. GalleyChatter columnist Robin Beerbower rounds up the most-mentioned titles from this month’s chat below.
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During the post-Book Expo GalleyChat, those who had just returned from the show were eager to share newly discovered galleys they had lugged home. As we head in to the Fourth of July holiday, consider downloading digital review copies of these titles from Edelweiss or NetGalley.

If you fall in love any of these titles, be sure to consider nominating them for  LibraryReads. We’ve noted in red the deadlines for those titles that can still be nominated.

For a complete list of the 148 titles mentioned during the chat, check here.

Librarians’ Lunch Standouts

The AAP/LibraryReads lunch for librarians at Book Expo was a sold out affair with the usual stellar line-up of authors. The MC was “America’s Librarian” Nancy Pearl, who has written her first novel, George and Lizzie (S&S/Touchstone, September; LibraryReads deadline: July 20) about the meeting and marriage of sweet, practical George and the always dissatisfied Lizzie. Stephanie Chase, director of Hillsboro (OR) Public Library says, “Lizzie will jump out at you from the beginning, and whether you immediately love her, as I did, or hate her, you must give her a chance, for along the way, you’ll meet the wonderful Marla and James, and George’s fantastic parents, Lizzie’s not-so-fantastic parents, and George, of course.”

Gabrielle Zevin also charmed the audience. Her first book for adults, The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry was a hit with readers. Her next, Young Jane Young (Workman/Algonquin, August), a novel about reinvention after an indiscretion, is quickly gathering fans. Jennifer Winberry from says, “After having an affair with the local congressman for whom she is interning, Aviva Grossman finds herself unable to show her face in her Florida town and get a job.  Aviva changes her name and flees for a small town in Maine where she and her daughter live a relatively quiet life until she decides to run for local office and her past is dredged up. Told in alternating voices, families, relationships, and double standards all come to light making this a great choice for book groups.”

Buzz-Worthy Titles

Word spread fast about Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere (PRH/Penguin Press, September; LibraryReads deadline: July 20) causing galleys to fly out of the publisher’s booth. Frequent GalleyChat contributor Cynthia Baskin is an early admirer and says, “This terrific sophomore effort is about two dysfunctional families whose lives intersect and overlap in healthy and not-so-healthy ways. Although the main event is known from the beginning, the story builds tension slowly as Ng very deliberately peels away the characters’ interpersonal layers.  If you like domestic dramas, I highly recommend this book!”

Another galley that was difficult to find due to pre-pub buzz was Brendan Mathews family saga, World of Tomorrow (Hachette/Little, Brown, September; LibraryReads deadline: July 20; DRC on NetGalley). Jen Dayton, collection development librarian from Darien, CT, wasted no time before reading it. She reports, “Set over a week in June of 1939, we follow three Irish brothers as they interact with a cast of characters that include a member of the IRA, a Hungarian refugee, the ghost of Yeats, a Deb on the make and her plotting mother, and a ward boss looking for just a little respect.  But the true star of this novel is New York City in all her prewar glitz, glitter and grit.”

Chloe Benjamin’s The Immortalists (PRH/Putnam’s, January; LibraryReads deadline: Nov. 20; DRC on NetGalley), touted during Book Expo’s Book Buzz, is the story of a family’s life based on a psychic’s predicted death dates of each sibling. Andrienne Cruz predicts it will be a hit saying, “Four siblings dared to find out when they will die and face the consequence of this knowledge. This novel is filled with rich characters who seamlessly inhabit the pages. I am reminded of Pat Conroy’s books-with unflinching honesty and an electrifying setting in various decades set in New York, Las Vegas and San Francisco.” This is also a good candidate for those who want to read about family dysfunction similar to Hilma Wolitzer’s The Interestings and Cynthia Sweeney’s The Nest.

Set in the mountains and small towns of Oregon, Rene Denfeld’s The Child Finder (HarperColllins/Harper, September; LibraryReads deadline: July 20) is poised to be a big hit. Denfeld has taken a topic that could be disturbing and has made the characters believable and empathetic, even the ones that don’t appear to deserve any compassion. Meeting the author was a BEA highlight. Remember the words “radical empathy.” Kimberly McGee from Lake Travis Community Library (TX) also loved it saying, “Naomi, also known as The Child Finder, is in search of a little girl who is lost in the woods – three years ago. Not only did the ‘snow child’ survive but she may not feel like a captive. We see through Naomi’s eyes that the circumstances of all the missing may take many forms. This multi-layered novel is quiet and heartbreaking and violent all at once.”

Death Becomes Her

Mortician Caitlin Doughty’s first book, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory was one of my 2015 favorite books and I am pleased to say From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death (Norton, October; LibraryReads deadline: August 20) should prove to be just as popular. Journeying to various countries to research the ways cultures handle their dead might not be everybody’s idea for an adventure vacation but Caitlin is dedicated to ensuring that death is not only handled with respect but also endeavors to erase the stigma and fear of dead bodies. This is perfect for fans of Mary Roach’s Stiff.

Thrillers We Can’t Wait to Recommend

Three psychological suspense novels stood out with mentions by several presenters at the annual Book Expo Librarians’ Shout ‘n Share.

The first to receive multiple mentions was The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn (HarperCollins/Morrow, January; LibraryReads deadline: Nov 20) and even though it won’t be published until January, it is already garnering “much love” on Edelweiss (31 votes as of 6/21/17). Everyone of us who has read this marvelous piece of suspense want to start recommending it to readers now. Marika Zemke, Head of Adult Services at Commerce Township Public Library (MI), says, “Psychologist Anna Fox suffers from agoraphobia, and spends her days watching old, classic movies and drinking too much wine. She also watches her neighbors through her camera and one night as she’s spying on the new neighbors she sees something unthinkable. Or did she? This novel has the perfect number of twists that will keep readers guessing, from the very first page, until they close the book.” Expect high demand for this one.

Another domestic thriller that received multiple “shouts” was Liv Constantine’s The Last Mrs. Parrish (HarperCollins, October; LibraryReads deadline: August 20), a twisty novel about a plain nobody who worms her way into a wealthy woman’s life, only to find her careful plan in danger of collapsing. Stephanie Chase, Hillsboro (OR) Library’s library director, forecasts, “This is the successor to Gone Girl: sex, intrigue, and deceit.”

Galleys of The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen (Macmillan/St. Martin’s; January; LibraryReads deadline: Nov. 20) were plentiful and response has already been enthusiastic with some reporting the book bears being read twice in order to catch missed clues.  Jenna Friebel from Oak Park Public Library (IL) exclaimed, “Just one big twist after the other– impossible to put down. I loved that this is set up to seem like a clichéd jealous ex-wife novel but then turns out to be so much different.”

Oprah Announces
New Book Club Title

UPDATE: Click here for the official announcement, the reading group guide and Oprah’s interview with the author.

The newest Oprah Book Club selection was announced today on CBS This Morning:

The book is being released in paperback today:

Behold The Dreamers, Imbolo Mbue
Random House Trade Paperbacks, June 26, 2017
ISBN-13: 978-0525509714

Below, she speaks to librarians at a Penguin Random House preview, her first time speaking to an audience about her book.

Hitting Screens, Week of June 26, 2017

The upcoming weekend brings the latest in the family film franchise, Despicable Me 3 (see our earlier story for tie-ins), the debut of one adaptation and the continuation of a James Patterson TV series.

Fresh from winning Best Director at the Cannes Film Festival, only the second time a woman has done so in 71 years, Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled opens in theaters on June 30th [CORRECTION: the film opened in 4 theaters last week and did well. It expands to 500 locations on Friday].

Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell, Elle Fanning, and Kirsten Dunst star in the film about a group of women sequestered in a Southern girls boarding school during the Civil War and the wounded Union soldier who arrives at their doorstep. (See our earlier post for more on the novel and its adaptations).

Reviews vary widely. Entertainment Weekly calls it “a film that radiates with thrilling, deliciously dark southern gothic flair” and CNN credits it with being “a small-scale movie that exalts old-fashioned movie-making qualities, yielding a refreshingly understated alternative to a sea of summer blockbusters.”

On the other hand, USA Today writes, “While Coppola creates some gorgeous imagery, the drama amounts to an overly pretentious version of a sudsy made-for-TV movie, complete with bodice ripping.”

Coppola appeared on CBS This Morning to promote the film, talking about the cast and her vision for the story.

Tie-in edition: The Beguiled: A Novel (Movie Tie-In), Thomas Cullinan (PRH/Penguin; OverDrive Sample).

James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge’s Zoo returns to CBS for its third season on June 29; it stars Nonso Anozie, Nora Arnezeder, Billy Burke, Kristen Connolly, and James Wolk.

The first two seasons focused on how the animal kingdom turned on humans and began hunting them down. Humans developed a gas to stop them, but it had an unpleasant side effect. Rotten Tomatoes describes new series, “Ten years after the animals were cured but at the cost of sterilizing the human population, a new threat rises in the form of ‘the hybrids,’ an army of unstoppable lab-made creatures focused on destroying mankind.”

There was a tie-in for season one, the Zoo story was extended as one of Patterson BookShotsZoo 2, and is also a graphic novel. There is no tie-in for season 3.

Brain Exercise from the D.O.D.O.

The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland (HarperCollins/Morrow; HaperAudio; OverDrive Sample) debuts on the NYT Hardcover Fiction list this week at #11. It is the lead feature in the paper’s “Inside the List” column, which calls it “a fat marshmallow of a fantasy novel.”

The book, “about a time-traveling intelligence officer and a Harvard linguist who discover that magic was once commonplace” is a collaboration between the noted SF writer and the historical novelist, furthering the trend of genre blending. The NYT asks “If you co-write a book about magic, is that crowd-sorcery?”

Defending the book’s length, 768 pages, Stephenson says “The practice of sustained attention is something that’s happening less and less, especially in our leisure time, so a long narrative, and one that’s this intricate, which requires that you’re always plugged in, because there are various things going on at once — I think that that’s a great exercise. I would assign this book as a brain exercise, as well as a jolly good read.”

It also debuts the USA Today list at #29 and is the #1 Indie Next pick for July. Entertainment Weekly names it one of their “20 Must-Read Books” of the summer. Booklist and Kirkus star, with the latter calling it “Immense and immensely entertaining.” The Guardian reviews it, writing that it is “big, roomy and enjoyable … The characters are lively, the plot moves along and the whole thing possesses heart and charm.” The Washington Post calls it “ambitious” and says “There’s a lot going on here — stylistic flourishes, comedic pratfalls, romance and science — but it’s handled deftly.”

Titles to Know and Recommend, Week of June 26, 2017

 

Several recognized names return next week, including one that is rarely absent, James Patterson, the holds leader for the week with Murder Games (Hachette/Little, Brown; Blackstone Audio; Hachette Large Print; OverDrive Sample; OverDrive Audio Sample). It’s been optioned for a CBS series, Dr. Death, to star Alan Cumming. The Patterson name will also appear on a TV series at the end of the week, when the third season of Zoo begins on 6/30/17.

Diana Gabaldon gives fans an amuse bouche as they await season three of Starz Outlander series, which begins in September, and as they also await the ninth title in the book series, Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone, not yet scheduled for publication. Coming next week is Seven Stones to Stand or Fall: A Collection of Outlander Fiction (PRH/Delacorte; Recorded Books). Entertainment Weekly offers an excerpt.

Exploring a new format, Marie Kondo spins off her major best seller with the a manga version, The Life-Changing Manga of Tidying Up (PRH/TenSpeed). In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Kondo recounts discovering that her father was deeply influenced by the manga Black Jack by Osamu Tezuka, about whether doctors should prolong life at all costs, or focus on the quality of life. She says it influenced many people, including her father, to enter the medical profession.

The titles covered here, and several other notable titles arriving next week, are listed with ordering information and alternate formats, on our downloadable spreadsheet, EarlyWord New Title Radar, Week of 6/26/17.

Peer Picks

Two LibraryReads titles arrive this week.

The Child, Fiona Barton (PRH/Berkley; RH Large Print; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample).

“When a baby skeleton is unearthed at a construction site, reporter Kate Waters thinks it is a story worth investigating. As she digs into the mystery of the child, she uncovers more than she bargained for. Told from the viewpoints of various characters, Barton tells an intriguing tale about the newborn baby and all the characters involved, leaving it up to the readers to put together the connections until the very end.” — Annice Sevett, New Hanover County Public Library, Wilmington, NC

Additional Buzz: It is one of three People magazine book picks of the week. LitHub names it one of “5 Crime Must-Reads Coming In June,” writing “Barton is a top-notch suspense writer, throwing in realistic and chilling twists to this compelling book.” It headlines Bustle‘s “The 18 Best Fiction Books Coming Out in June 2017.” They call it an “edge-of-your-seat thriller.” Time picks it as one of “The Top 10 Thrillers to Read This Summer.”

The Waking Land, Callie Bates (PRH/Del Rey; Random House Audio; OverDrive Sample).

“Lady Elanna Voltai flees her adopted homeland when the king, who raised her like a daughter, dies under mysterious circumstances and Elanna is accused of murder. Forced to return to the magical homeland of her birth and her estranged father who was branded a traitor for inciting rebellion, Elanna must come to terms with the life she left behind and her destiny. I loved watching Elanna find her voice and her strength, and the rich world of magic around her makes this story even more fantastic!” — Jessica Perham, Schaumburg Township Library, Schaumburg, IL

Additional Buzz: It is also an Indie Next pick.

Three additional Indie Next titles will also be published this week:

The Windfall, Diksha Basu (PRH/Crown; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample).

“The Jhas are a fairly normal family in Delhi, but when Mr. Jha sells his company for millions and decides to move himself and his wife to a fancy new neighborhood, he sets in motion changes for not only his wife, but also his son studying in New York and his former and future neighbors — changes that are sometimes good, sometimes bad, and uncomfortable either way. Jam-packed with fun and lovable characters, this novel is both a delicious, gossipy indulgence and a fascinating glimpse into the lives of people very different from one another. Those who loved the drama of The Nest will adore this warm, tender, and very funny debut from a fresh new voice.” —Kelly Morton, Joseph-Beth Booksellers, Cincinnati, OH

Additional Buzz: It is on The MillionsJune Preview: The Millions Most Anticipated (This Month) and the New York Post‘s “The 29 best books of the summer.” Good Housekeeping names it one of “The 21 Best New Books for Summer 2017.”

Spoonbenders, Daryl Gregory (PRH/Knopf; RH Large Print; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample).

“The Amazing Telemachus Family is unlike any other. Patriarch Teddy is a con man whose adult children possess remarkable psychic gifts (telekinesis, lie detection, and clairvoyance), but the loss of their mother leaves the entire family reeling. Though the Telemachus crew’s misadventures attract the attention of everyone from the CIA to a scary local crime boss, Teddy and his children are more threatened by their own emotional damage and sketchy past than anything else. Gregory’s characters are sharply drawn and lovable, and he tells their story in a way that’s wise, warm, and entertaining throughout. With a strong sense of humor and an amazing climax, this is the kind of novel that’s an absolute blast to read.” —Erika VanDam, RoscoeBooks, Chicago, IL

Additional Buzz: It is on Elle‘s “Guide to the Best Books of the Summer” and is one of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette‘s book editor’s “picks for summer 2017.SyfyWire puts it on their “Fangrrls June sci-fi/fantasy book preview.”

Drunks: An American History, Christopher Finan (Beacon Press; Blackstone Audio; OverDrive Sample).

“The long and evolving history of alcoholism and corresponding sobriety movements in America is fascinating, for both its colorful characters and its complex interface with religion and the sciences. In Finan’s astute, well-researched, and entertaining narrative, this story of sober drunks offers both understanding and insight into a critically important subject whose nature has long been occluded and subsumed in stigma.” —Kenny Brechner, Devaney Doak & Garrett Booksellers, Farmington, ME

Tie-ins

The mass market tie-in arrives for The Dark Tower I (MTI): The Gunslinger by Stephen King (S&S/Pocket; S&S Audio; OverDrive Sample).

As we wrote earlier, the movie opens August 4, 2017 and stars Matthew McConaughey and Idris Elba.

The NYT has a guide to what you need to know about the story.

Two tie-ins also arrive for the animated Emoji movie. Premiering on July 28, it is set inside the world of a cell phone and stars TJ Miller, Anna Faris, James Corden, and many more, playing characters such as Hi-5, Meh, Smiler, and Fist Bump.

Responding to the trailer, The Guardian says it “may be one of the most conceptually baffling films ever to be put into production.”

 

 

 

 

 

The Emoji Movie Junior Novelization adapted by Tracey West, (S&S/Simon Spotlight).

Break Out! adapted by Cordelia Evans, illustrated by Andy Bialk (S&S/Simon Spotlight; also in trade paperback).

For our full list of upcoming adaptations, download our Books to Movies and TV and link to our listing of tie-ins.