EarlyWord

News for Collection Development and Readers Advisory Librarians

Adaptations Update; Streaming Services Causing Upheaval

 

One of two film adaptations opening today, Angelina Jolie’s First They Killed My Father debuts in just 13 cities, as well as on Netflix. It’s rare that a film appears in theaters as well as on demand. Theater owners generally stick to the 90-day window, refusing to book any movie set to appear on demand within that period, let alone on the same date. Landmark Theaters, however, has a deal with Netflix, which also applies to the upcoming adaptation of Kent Haruf’s Our Souls at Night, starring Robert Redford and Jane Fonda.

While many studio chiefs say they want to support theater owners with the 90-day rule, Fox CEO Lachlan Murdoch spoke out strongly against the practice this week, claiming it will change in the next year, but not specifying how.

The rise of streaming services is also causing pain to cable TV. A new report says that more people are quitting cable in favor of streaming.

But Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos seems to be suffering at least a bit of cable envy. This week, he ordered Amazon studios to bring him a show like HBO’s Game of Thrones. Presumably, he’s not impressed with award-winning series that draw relatively small audiences. Amazon Studio head, Roy Price, tells Variety, “We’ve been looking at the data for some time, and as a team, we’re increasingly focused on the impact of the biggest shows. It’s pretty evident that it takes big shows to move the needle.” Already canceled is the second season of Z, based on Therese Anne Fowler’s novel about Zelda Fitzgerald. It’s predicted that a planned series based on Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan will suffer a similar fate

The second adaptation opening today fits the traditional model, debuting in 3,100 theaters. American Assassin, based on Vince Flynn’s series, is expected to do well at the box office and launch a new franchise, but not to eclipse Stephen King’s It, which exceeded expectations and gave the movie business a much-needed piece of good news after a dismal summer.

Those are just a few of the nearly 50 projects we’ve recently updated on our spreadsheet of Upcoming Movies & TV Based on Books. To browse the updates, download EarlyWord, Books to Movies, UPDATES — Aug 22 thru Sept 14, 2017.

Man Booker Shortlist, 2017

The shortlist for one of the most influential literary awards in the English language, the 2017 Man Booker Prize, was announced in London today. Surprisingly, the novel that has won the most awards to date, including the Pulitzer Prize, Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, did not make it to the shortlist. Several other big names also did not make the cut, Arundhati Roy, Sebastian Barry, and Zadie Smith.The Guardian declares the list “daring,” featuring novels that “reject conventional realism and celebrate precarious and unstable narratives,”

Half of the six titles are by authors from the U.S., as the New York Times notes in its headline.

The winner will be announced on Oct. 17.

4 3 2 1,  Paul Auster, January 31, 2017, Macmillan/Henry Holt and Co.; Trade pbk, Picador, February 6, 2018 — U.S.

History of Wolves, Emily Fridlund, January 3, 2017, Atlantic Monthly Press; Trade pbk, Grove Press, November 7, 2017 — U.S, debut author

Exit West, Mohsin Hamid, Riverhead Books, March 7, 2017; Trade pbk, March 6, 2018 — UK/Pakistan

Elmet, Fiona Mozley, No US publisher announced yet. UK publisher is Hodder & Stoughton — UK. A first novel, this one is considered a wild card. UPDATE: it is now set to be published by Workman/Algonquin, December 5, 2017, )ship Date: November 8, 2017) and to be released in audio by HighBridge Audio.

Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders, February 14, 2017, Random House; Random House Trade Paperback, February 6, 2018 — U.S.

Autumn, Ali Smith, February 7, 2017, PRH/Pantheon; Trade pbk, PRH/Anchor, October 31, 2017 — Scotland

Meet A.J. Finn, the Author of
THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW

 

For several months, GalleyChatters have been talking about A.J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018), predicting it will be the hot debut of 2018.

Below, we chat with the author.

       

GalleyChatters Predict:
Fall/Winter Reading Trends

The trend for psychological thrillers has had amazing longevity. With so many new titles published in the genre, fans are becoming more and more demanding.

Two titles were mentioned most often during last week’s GalleyChat as the best of the upcoming crop:

 

The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018) — please join us for a chat with the author, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 4 to 5 pm. ET, Chat window will be posted at 3 pm on EarlyWord.com

Sometimes I Lie, Alice Feeney, (Macmillan/Flatiron, March 13, 2018) — this one is SO twisty, that it lost several readers. The title itself warns readers that this is they’re dealing with the ultimate in unreliable narrators.

Nods also went to:

   

The Last Mrs. Parrish, Liv Constantine, (Harper, October 17)

Poison, Galt Niederhoffer, (Macmillan/ St. Martin’s, November 21)

The Wife Between Us, Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, January 9, 2018)

If you’re not a fan of the genre, or just need a palate cleanser, there’s much to tempt you from the nearly 130 titles getting enthusiastic endorsements (see the Edelweiss catalog here).

For those hoping to sniff out the next trend, Marika Zemke of Commerce Twp. (MI) Public Library makes a strong case for medical narratives and survival stories, saying people crave them these days. With hurricanes and fires raging and a chaotic federal government, that seems to make sense. She offers  the following as examples:

     

The Encore: A Memoir in Three Acts, Charity Tillemann-Dick, (S&S/Atria, October 3) — an opera singer continues her career despite having BOTH lungs transplanted.

Counting Backwards: A Doctor’s Notes on Anesthesia, Henry Jay Przybylo, (Norton, November 14), — “takes you past the forbidden operating room doors into the O.R.”

In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Awdish, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, October 24)  — A doctor learns first hand the flaws in current medical practice when she nearly dies herself.

The Cookie Cure: A Mother/Daughter Memoir of Cookies and Cancer, Susan Stachler, Laura Stachler, (Sourcebooks, February 1, 2018)   — “an almost unbelievable story of medical coincidence.”

Some of you may remember an earlier time when medical narratives were all the rage. GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower says they’ve never gone out of style for her. She remembers, “Back in the late 70s I read Elder’s And I Alone Survived, which fueled my obsession with survival stories. My medical obsession started in the early 1970s with James Kerr’s soap opera-ish novel The Clinic and, of course, Hailey’s Diagnosis. About 30 years ago Echo Heron published Intensive Care, about her stint as a nurse, along with Carol Gino’s The Nurse’s Story. Like many library patrons, I couldn’t get enough of these kinds of stories.”

Below is a transcript. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

Adaptations Update

The adaptation of Donna Tartt’s 2013 best seller The Goldfinch (Hachette/Little,Brown) may finally be moving ahead. Variety reports that Warner Bros. is working on a deal with Amazon Studios to co-finance the project.

That’s just one of the over 40 projects we’ve updated on our spreadsheet of Upcoming Movies & TV Based on Books in the last two weeks. To browse the latest information, download EarlyWord, Books to Movies, UPDATES — Aug 7 thru Aug 22

Other highlights:

Production has begun in Atlanta on a movie based on the YA novel Dumplin’  by Julie Murphy. In the title role is Australian actress Danielle Macdonald, who is currently getting kudos as the star of Patti Cake$. Jennifer Aniston will join her in the musical comedy, playing her mother.

A director has been hired for a TV series based on Amor Towles’s A Gentleman From Moscow, which is still on the NYT best seller list, at #8 after 28 weeks.

Stars have been announced for a TV series based on Deborah Harkness’s A Discovery of Witches.

Octavia Butler’s Dawn, Book One in her Lilith’s Brood trilogy,(1987) is being developed as a TV series.

Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House is moving forward as a Netflix series.

Trailers have been released for:

Our Souls at Night, based on Ken Haruf’s 2015 novel.

Molly’s Game based on the memoir, Molly’s Game: From Hollywood’s Elite to Wall Street’s Billionaire Boys Club, My High-Stakes Adventure in the World of Underground Poker, by Molly Bloom, (HarperCollins/It Books, 2014)

Weekend To Do List: Nominate Titles for LibraryReads

Add something fun to your weekend to do list, nominate titles for LibraryReads.

The nomination deadline for October titles is this Sunday, August 20th. But you can also nominate titles with publication dates beyond October. Ideally, the best time to nominate titles is right after finish reading the galley.

For those new to nominating, the video below describes the basics. In addition, LibraryReads Steering Committee members Stephanie Chase (Hillsboro [OR] Public Library) and David Wright (Seattle Public Library) describe how to find galleys (time stamp 38:10) and demystify writing reviews (time stamp 45:26).

The lists have come under scrutiny recently for under-representing authors of color (see the Book Riot ‘s “LibraryReads So White, or Why Librarians Need to Do Better”), for featuring established authors over less-known (see Becky Spratford’s RA for All post), and large publishing houses over indie presses. David Wright makes a strong case in the video above for librarians using the lists to demonstrate their ability as taste makers, rather than followers, (time stamp 4:09).

The lists reflect what librarians are reading and loving, so commit to diversifying your own reading. Check out publisher’s recommendations in the diversity catalogs linked at the right. Get to know indie publishers, sign up for their marketing newsletters (see our list of publisher contacts in the links at the right) and turn to their catalogs when choosing what to read next.

Meet Stephanie Powell Watts,
ALA Book Club’s Inaugural Pick

Cuyahoga Public Library hosted  Stephanie Powell Watts in a Facebook Live chat on Wednesday. If you missed it, you can watch the video here (be sure to follow Cuyahoga County Public Library on Facebook first).

More on the book and author, below:

Reviews (rated an overall RAVE from BookMarks)

NPR interview with the author

Women Authors Rule Hugo Awards

The best novel winner and nominees for the Hugo Award, announced today, below:

Winner — The Obelisk Gate, N. K. Jemisin, (Hachette/Orbit) — this is the second Hugo in a row for the author. She won for The Fifth Season (Hachette/Orbit) last year. They are the first two titles in a trilogy. The final, The Stone Sky, is set for release next week.

All the Birds in the Sky, Charlie Jane Anders, (Macmillan/Tor) — this won the Nebula this year

A Closed and Common Orbit, Becky Chambers, (HarperVoyager)

Death’s End, Cixin Liu, (Macmillan/Tor) — the author won the Hugo in 2015

Ninefox Gambit, Yoon Ha Lee, (S&S/Solaris)

Too Like the Lightning, Ada Palmer, (Macmillan/Tor)

Winners and nominees in all the other categories, here.

Movie/TV Adaptations, Updates

Although EarlyWord is no longer publishing on a daily basis, we continue to update the resources listed on the right

Since July 3rd, we have added new information on 60 projects to our spreadsheet of Upcoming Movies & TV Based on Books. Download a spreadsheet to browse just the newest lists here, Adaptation Updates.

The most intriguing book and TV news doesn’t appear on that list, however, since it’s not an adaptation. It’s PBS’s announcement last week of “The Great American Read” (working title), an eight-part series, with the ambitious goal of getting people to vote for  “America’s Best Loved Book,” set to kick off in May, 2018

Also not based on a book, but arriving with several tie-ins, as well as plenty of display opportunities, is Ken Burns’s documentary The Vietnam War which debuts on PBS on 9/17/17 (included in our catalog of tie-ins here).

GalleyChat, Aug. 1, Transcript

Below is an edited version of yesterday’s GalleyChat. We’ve reorganized the tweets to make it easier to follow the discussion and added links to each title. UPDATE: If you get the dreaded spinning wheel in the widget below, try this link.

Click here for an Edelweiss catalog of the titles that were discussed.

The next GalleyChat is on September 5th, the day after Labor Day (don’t get distracted by the holiday, put it on your calendars)

YA/MG Galley chat is on August 15. Details on joining each chat are here.

Booker 17 Longlist

The Booker longlist, announced today, is “thronged with literary titans, whose combined trophy cabinet would include the Pulitzer, the Costa, the Baileys, the Folio, the Impac and the Goldsmiths prizes,” notes the Guardian, but it also manages to squeeze in three debut novels.

Nine of the thirteen titles are available in the US, three are scheduled for release later this year. A fourth, Elmet by Fiona Mozley, does not yet have a US publisher.

Download a spreadsheet with US publication information here, Booker Longlist 2017.

YA/MG GalleyChat,Tues. July 18

Today’s YA/MG GalleyChat has ended. Below is the transcript. If the widget does not load, try this link.

Link here to the Edelweiss catalog of titles mentioned.

Join us for the next chat on Tuesday, August 15, 4 to 5 pm (3:30 for virtual cocktails. Virgin, of course).

GalleyChat, Tues. July 11

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tuesday, August 1, 4 to 5 p.m., ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails!)

More info on how to join here.

Below is an edited transcript of the chat. UPDATE: If the widget does not load, try this link.

A Word from EarlyWord

UPDATE: Thanks for the wonderful comments and best wishes. We are thrilled and humbled. 

This is our final EarlyWord post. Over the last nine years, we have enjoyed your support and enthusiasm for EarlyWord.com.

We will continue the EarlyWord GalleyChats and invite you to join us for the Adult chat on Tuesday, July 11th and the YA/Middle Grade chat on July 18th.

We have dozens of people to thank for EarlyWord‘s existence, most importantly, our readers. You dazzle us every day with your dedication to helping people discover books and become lifelong readers.

EarlyWord could not have gotten off the ground without our co-founder and “spiritual guru,” Fred Ciporen. Thanks to you, Chris Kahn for helping our advertisers craft creative and meaningful promotions. Thanks to Robin Beerbower and all the GalleyChatters for spotting forthcoming titles we should all read. You’ve had an amazing track record in putting the “early” into EarlyWord. Also thanks to kids contributors Lisa Von Drasek and to JoAnn Jonas, who enthusiastically moderated over 40 chats with middle-grade and YA authors. Our web designer, Chris Andreola of adcSTUDIO created a site that pleases us each time we look at it, which is saying a lot, considering how many times a day we go to it.

A special thanks to the library marketers at the publishing companies that have supported us. It’s been a joy to get to know you and I hope we have served our mission as the “Publisher Librarian Connection.”

As I’ve said many times before, “Keep on Reading!”

Nora

Nora Rawlinson
Co-Founder and Editor

Towards a More Diverse LibraryReads

UPDATE: Just added, the Penguin Random House diversity catalog.

A recent story on Book Riot pointed out a lack of diversity among the LibraryReads picks. To help librarians discover titles by a wider range of authors, we asked library marketers at the various publishing houses to put together what we call, for the lack of a better term, “diversity catalogs” of titles eligible for LibraryReads nominations. We have posted the ones we’ve received so far in the links at the right and will add more as we receive them.

What better time than the Fourth of July holiday to celebrate diversity? Highlighted below are titles available to download now and one to request:

  

The City of Brass, S A. Chakrabortty, (HarperCollins/ Harper Voyager)

A debut fantasy that interweaves aspects of Muslim culture. HarperCollins Voyager imprint is one to look to, as they declare themselves “committed to introducing a new wave of diverse voices and intriguing stories that push the boundaries of science fiction and fantasy for the 21st century.”  Listen to the Book Buzz description here. See the full HarperCollins diversity catalog here.

The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao, Martha Batalha, translated by Eric M. B. Becker (Oneworld Publications, dist. by IPG)

Originally published in Brazil, it is described by the publisher as “A darkly comic portrait of two rebellious sisters in 1940s Rio de Janeiro that illuminates contemporary issues of feminism and domestic equality. ” It is published by independent publisher Oneworld Publications, which focuses on “diverse cultures and historical events.” Recently profiled in the Guardian, the 30-year-old company is based in Oxford, U.K., and opened offices in New York in 2009. Its titles are distributed in the US via Publishers Group West [Note: this is a correction. Previously, we incorrectly identified the distributor as IPG]. See the full IPG/PGW diversity catalog here.

Real American: A Memoir, Julie Lythcott-Haims, (Macmillan/Holt)

Called a “bold, impassioned memoir that explores the emotional and cultural divide imposed by American racism on people of mixed race” by Publishers Weekly, this is by the author of the best-selling anti-helicopter parenting book, How to Raise an Adult. Full Macmillan diversity catalog here.

Dogs at the Perimeter, Madeleine Thien, (Norton, Original Trade Pbk; Recorded Books)

Chinese-Canadian Thien’s novel Do Not Say We Have Nothing (Norton; Recorded Books; OverDrive Sample) was a finalist for the Man Booker and swept Canada’s literary awards. This, her third novel, available for the first time in the U.S., is about Cambodian refugees dealing with past traumas. It received strong reviews when it was published in the UK in 2012, including The Economist, which noted, “The strife in Indo-China has inspired some astonishing writing in recent decades, both fiction and non-fiction. Dogs at the Perimeter belongs with the best of such works.” Like the other titles in the Norton diversity catalog, it is available by request.

We’re Going To Need More Wine, Gabrielle Union, (HarperCollins/Dey Street).

We mentioned this collection of essays by the actress and activist in our earlier post, noting her heartfelt tribute to libraries during a panel at Book Expo.

It’s now available to download.