Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Eight Titles to Know and Recommend, Week of April 28

Friday, April 24th, 2015

Next week brings the second anniversary of the escape of three women who were abducted and held prisoner in a home in Cleveland, celebrated by the release of a new book about their ordeal. A struggle of a different sort is examined by literary favorite Karl Ove Knausgaard. Leading in holds is John Sanford’s new title in the Prey series, while indies, fellow librarians and Entertainment Weekly all herald favorites of the week.

The titles covered here, and several more notable titles arriving next week, are listed, with ordering information and alternate formats, on our downloadable spreadsheet, EarlyWord New Title Radar, Week of April 27, 2015

Holds Leaders

9780399168796_8c46f  9781250020086_ce493  9781501110993_a568e

Gathering Prey, John Sandford, (Penguin/Putnam; Penguin Audio; Thorndike; OverDrive Sample)

The 25th in the Prey series, this comes just six months after the author’s previous best seller, Deadline.

Your Next Breath, Iris Johansen, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s Press; Brilliance Audio; Thorndike; OverDrive Sample)

Not to be outdone by prolific author Sanford, Johansen’s next also arrives six months after her previous title, The Perfect Witness

Death Wears a Beauty Mask and Other Stories, Mary Higgins Clark, (S&S; S&S/Audio; Thorndike; OverDrive Sample)

Much further down the holds lists, we love the title of the new collection of stories.

Media Attention

9780525427650_1b468-2Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland, Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus, (Penguin/Viking; Penguin Audio; Thorndike; OverDrive Sample)

Two years ago, three women finally escaped from a home in Cleveland where they had been chained and repeatedly raped by their abductor. People magazine features an excerpt of a new book by two of those women in the new issue (not yet online, promo here) and Robin Roberts will do an hour-long ABC hour special with the authors on Tuesday.


ABC Breaking US News | US News Videos

Finding MeMore is coming on the story.

On Saturday, May 2, Lifetime will air a movie, Cleveland Abduction based on a book published last year by the third  Cleveland captive, Michelle Knight, Finding Me: A Decade of Darkness, a Life Reclaimed, (Perseus/Weinstein; OverDrive Sample).

 

9780914671008_83538 9781935744825_215c2 9781935744863_bc8ba 

My Struggle: Book Four, Karl Ove Knausgaard, (Steerforth/Archipelago; OverDrive Sample)

Most of us are n9780914671176_e9ba7ot in on the cult surrounding Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgaard, called by some a “modern-day Proust” for his series of autobiographical novels. For an examination of the phenomenon, read the quote-peppered piece in this week’s New York Magazine, “The Very Public Saga of Karl Ove Knausgaard Writing About Himself.”

Further proving his cred as a writer’s writer, the latest title in the series is reviewed by Jeffrey Eugenides in the week’s NYT Book Review, who notes, “I may be the first reviewer of Knausgaard’s autobiographical works who has appeared in one of them,” putting him, he claims, in a position to “judge how [Knausgaard} uses the stuff of his life to fashion his stories.”

The result? Eugenides judges him no less than a great writer. The first three hardcovers have been released in trade paperback by Macmillan/FSG and Recorded Books is doing them in audio.

Picks

9780307700322_4dba0  9780316244725_d34a3  9781594204920_d9710

Early Warning, Jane Smiley, (RH/Knopf; RH & BOT Audio; Thorndike; OverDrive Sample)

LibraryReads:
“In the second book of the Langdon trilogy, the Pulitzer Prize winning novelist follows the next generation of the unforgettable Iowa family introduced in Some Luck. Beginning with the death of the patriarch Walter in 1953, Smiley chronicles the social consciousness in America of the 1960s. The book goes up to events in the 1970s and early 1980s that touch each family member in unforeseen ways.” — Jennifer Winberry, Hunterdon County Library, Flemington, NJ

Smiley was interviewed on NPR’s Diane Rehm Show this week.

The Doll Maker, Richard Montanari, (Hachette/Mulholland; Hachette Audio; OverDrive Sample)

Number three on the “Must List” in the new issue of Entertainment Weekly:
“The eighth installment in the popular Byrne and Balzano series sees the detectives investigating a string of gruesome murders. Children are killed then posed in public like dolls. Your pulse will race as they try to solve the case before another life is lost.”

The Last Bookaneer, Matthew Pearl, (Penguin Press; Penguin & BOT Audio; Thorndike; OverDrive Sample)

The audio is narrated by Golden Voice Simon Vance. Treat yourself by giving it a listen:

Indie Next:
“An adventure, a mystery, an historical fiction — this exciting read defies categorization. With quirky and engaging characters who are at once villains, crooks, and heroes, along with exotic locations, literary figures, fast-paced action, and a surprise ending, this novel has something for everyone. Changing copyright laws spell the end of the line for career book thieves and spies, and a race against time and competitors makes for a story that is hard to put down. This will be another bestseller for Pearl!” —Coleen Colwell, BookSmart, Morgan Hill, CA

New David Mitchell Novel
Coming in October

Monday, April 6th, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-04-06 at 9.26.34 AMDavid Mitchell’s next novel is Slade House (Random House; ISBN 9780812998689; $26), to be published on Oct. 27th.

The 272-page book, which is much shorter than a typically Mitchell tome, started out as a series of tweets and then, according to The LA Times “Jacket Copy,” “morphed, Mitchell-istically, into a five-part novel.”

Not much is known about the book as yet. The publisher information describes it as,

“a taut, intricately woven, spine-chilling, reality-warping novel. Set across five decades, beginning in 1979 and coming to its astonishing conclusion on October 31, 2015.”

The Guardian reports it is set in the same universe as The Bone Clocks.

Fans of Mitchell typically have to wait at least two years between titles, but Slade House will be in readers’ hands 13 months after most began reading The Bone Clocks.

In keeping with a move to create physically compelling print books, Slade House is in a smaller trim size than normal hardcovers and will be issued without a jacket so readers can appreciate the die cut cover and the peak-a-boo illustration beneath.

Coming: THE WINDS OF WINTER

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-04-03 at 8.32.03 AMGeorge R.R. Martin offers fans a glimpse into his upcoming novel, The Winds of Winter, with an excerpt featuring the character Alayne, better known as Sansa Stark.

The sneak peek, announced on Martin’s blog yesterday, reveals the once battered and cowed Sansa to be still at the Eyrie, hiding out as “Alayne,” the bastard daughter of Littlefinger, and caught up in another of his plots to seduce a man. Alayne seems to be more than holding her own now, telling her would-be suitor on the eve of a tourney, “I hope you joust better than you talk.”

Martin released another excerpt last year. It was so popular it crashed his site.

There is no firm news on when Martin hopes to complete The Winds of Winter but he has been clearing his schedule to devote more time to the long anticipated novel. Note: the cover we show here may not be the official one. It appears all over the internet, including on Entertainment Weekly’s site, but seems to have originated as fan art. UPDATE: We checked with the publisher, who confirms the cover is NOT official.

The showrunners of the HBO series based on his books recently announced that they will begin to outpace Martin’s story after the upcoming season, leaving fans to pick between spoiler-viewing or waiting for Martin to catch up.

The fifth season of HBO’s Game of Thrones begins on April 12.

New Host for THE DAILY SHOW

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

The news that The Daily Show has a new host, Trevor Noah, occupied much of the media yesterday.

Noah joined the cast of The Daily Show as a contributor in 2014 and is an internationally known comic previously based in South Africa. There are no details in the widespread coverage (here, here, and here) to indicate that Noah will be as book-friendly as Jon Stewart (who, incidentally has no authors booked this week after his triple-header last week).

Among Stewart proteges, only Stephen Colbert shared the book bug (we’ll see what if that continues when he begins hosting The Late Show in September), but neither John Oliver nor Larry Wilmore has continued that tradition. Here’s hoping Noah surprises us (and who would have predicted, when Stewart began hosting the show, that he would become a major book champion?)

One of our favorite Jon Stewart moments proved he not only knows books, but also understands libraries. This may be the only time the Boston Public Library’s “Statement of Purpose” was quoted on national TV:

Women’s Prize for Fiction, Longlist

Monday, March 16th, 2015

The longlist for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction (formerly the Orange Prize), announced last week, includes several LibraryReads picks:

station eleven  Elizabeth is Missing  9781101874271_0ee2a

Bees  9780062227096_1ce94  9781594633119_8c400

Emily St. John Mandel,  Station Eleven (Picador; US, RH/Knopf) — a LibraryReads Top Ten Favorite for the year.

Emma Healey, Elizabeth is Missing (Viking; US, Harper, 6/10/14 ) — Number one LibraryReads pick for the month of June, 2014

Anne Tyler, A Spool of Blue Thread (Chatto & Windus; US, RH/Knopf) — Number one LibraryReads pick for the month of Feb, 2015

Laline Paull, The Bees (Fourth Estate; US, Harper, 4/14/14) — LibraryReads pick for the month of May 2014

Sandra Newman, The Country of Ice Cream Star (Chatto & Windus; US, HarperCollins/Ecco, 1/22/15)  — LibraryReads pick for the month of Nov. 2014

Sarah Waters, The Paying Guests (Virago; US, Penguin/Riverhead, 9/18/14); LibraryReads pick for the month of September 2014

The other 14 titles on the list, with U.S. publication information, after the jump.

(more…)

John Lewis on THE DAILY SHOW

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-03-10 at 9.21.39 AM  Screen Shot 2015-03-10 at 9.21.24 AM

John Lewis was interviewed on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart yesterday, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. Congressman Lewis spoke about the first two books in his graphic novel trilogy, March: Book One (Top Shelf Productions, 2013; OverDrive Sample) and March: Book Two (Top Shelf Productions, 2015), sending both books up the Amazon sales charts.

During the interview Congressman Lewis described a childhood of discrimination and how his parents would tell him “don’t get in the way, don’t get in trouble.” When he met Dr. King he said he found a means to “get in the way” and to “get in good, necessary trouble.”

The graphic novels recount Mr. Lewis’s life and momentous events in the Civil Rights Movement, from sit-ins to the Freedom Riders. He told Stewart he decided to write the March books because he wanted to

“… inspire another generation of young people to get out there, push, and stand up, and speak up, and speak out, and get in the way the same way that my generation got in the way, good trouble, necessary trouble.”

March: Book One was a Coretta Scott King honor book for 2014 and appeared on a host of best of lists. March: Book Two, which came out earlier this year, got glowing reviews and wide acclaimThe Washington Post called  it “a must-read monument.”

DEAD WAKE Sails On

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

dead-wakeErik Larson’s Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania (RH/Crown; RH and BOT Audio; RH Large Print) has received heavy advance media attention. It got even more on Saturday with an interview on NPR’s Weekend Edition.

The account of the sinking is currently #1 on Amazon’s sales rankingsLibrary holds are also growing.

The Maya Angelou Stamp

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

The post office has just unveiled a stamp honoring Maya Angelou, which will be issued on April 7 and is now available for pre-order.

It seems particularly fitting that it is a “forever” stamp.

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Early Reviews: THE BURIED GIANT

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

9780307271037_b504aComing next week, Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant (RH/Knopf; RH Audio; OverDrive Sample) appeared on all the “Most Anticipated” lists for the new year and is getting a great deal of advance review attention.


The NYT Book Review features it on the cover of the upcoming issue , with a review by Neil Gaiman (whose just released collection of stories and poems Trigger Warning, is also getting attention), in a review that indicates he had trouble nailing the book down, regretting his “inability to fall in love with it, much as I wanted to, ” and even after “reading it a second and third time … still finding  its characters and events and motives easier to understand, but even so, it guards its secrets and it world close.” He can’t let it go, however, because it “does what important books do: It remains in the mind long after it has been read, refusing to leave, forcing one to turn it over and over.”

The New York Times daily critic, Michiko Kakutani, has no problem dismissing it, calling it an “eccentric, ham-handed fairy tale with a jumble of story lines lifted from Beowulf, Arthurian legend and assorted folk traditions … recounted in stilted, formalistic language that’s presumably meant to evoke a bygone era.”

Among the novel’s fans are the Washington Post‘s former Book World editor, Marie Arana and booksellers, who picked it as an Indie Next title:

Ishiguro’s new novel is a work of wonder, transport, and beauty. A recurrent theme in his earlier books, always shown with great originality, is the matter of what happens after we have lost our way. In The Buried Giant, Ishiguro explores losing direction, memory, and certainty, as the primary characters cling to remnants of codes of behavior and belief. Which is the way through the forest? Where might our son be? And where is the dragon, and who shall seek to slay her? Set in the time just after King Arthur’s reign, Ishiguro’s tale, with striking, fable-like rhythm and narrative, shows how losing and finding our way runs long, deep, and to the core of things. — Rick Simonson, The Elliott Bay Book Company, Seattle, WA

Christmas At DOWNTON ABBEY

Friday, December 26th, 2014

In Great Britain, people are celebrating Boxing Day while  analyzing the various Christmas specials, including the conclusion to Downton Abbey, season five.

Here in the U.S., season five begins on PBS Sunday, Jan. 4 at 9 p.m. To tide us over, we have a delicious spoof of the series, created as a fund raiser for the U.K. charity Text Santa:

Season six is likely to begin in the U.K. in September. No news on whether it will be the final one, but British news is atwitter with the possibility of a Downton Abbey movie.

The INTERVIEW To Be Screened

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

Following dozens of protests over canceling the release of the movie The Interview due to threats from hackers, Sony did an about face on Monday, and announced they would authorize screenings.

The movie is currently scheduled for release in 292 theaters on Christmas Day, followed by 91 more after the New Year (far fewer than the 2,000 originally planned). The four largest chains, however — Regal, AMC, Cinemark and Carmke — are still refusing to show it, reports the New York Times.

PEN recently released a letter signed by nearly 50 authors, including Salman Rushdie and Neil Gaiman, as well as several publishers, urging Sony to “demonstrate the power of free expression by denying the cowards who made these threats the satisfaction of thinking they have succeeded,” and saying, “The attack on Sony Pictures is an assault on the wider creative community; one that must be met with unity and resolve.”

FRESH OFF THE BOAT Series Premiere

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

9780679644880_e6ee1  Fresh Off the Boat Key Art embed

ABC’s new comedy Fresh Off the Boat will premiere on Wednesday, Feb. 4  before moving to its regular timeslot on Tuesday, Feb. 10 at 8 p.m. ET.

Based on restaurateur and food show host Eddie Huang’s memoir of his childhood, Fresh Off the Boat, (RH/Spiegel & Grau; RH Audio; BOT), this will be the first Asian American family sitcom since Margaret Cho’s All American Girl.

The show stars Hudson Yang as the young Huang with Randall Park and Constance Wu as his parents. The show’s producer, the actual Eddie Huang, will do the voiceover narration.

The trailer for the show’s pilot, below:

SONS OF ANARCHY Tie-In Spoilers

Monday, December 8th, 2014

9781618931276_ee539The seven-year run of FX’s  Sons of Anarchy ends tomorrow night, but it seems some fans already know the ending because of an unauthorized release of the tie-in (see the story in Entertainment Weekly’s TV blog).

No problem for libraries; the few that ordered it haven’t received their copies yet.

 

Sons of Anarchy : The Official Collector’s Edition
Tara Bennett
Time Home Entertainment: December 10, 2014
9781618931276, 161893127X
$29.95 USD

Live Chat with Debut Author,
Brooke Davis

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014
Live Blog Live Chat with Brooke Davis, LOST & FOUND
 Live Chat with Brooke Davis, LOST & FOUND(12/03/2014) 
4:42
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We will begin our live online chat with Brooke Davis, author of LOST & FOUND, in about 15 minutes.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:42 Nora - EarlyWord
4:44
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Meanwhile, here’s the cover of LOST & FOUND, to published in the U.S. by Penguin/Dutton in January.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:44 Nora - EarlyWord
4:44
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:44 
4:45
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Brooke recorded a video intro. especially for First Flights members.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:45 Nora - EarlyWord
4:45
Nora - EarlyWordNora - EarlyWord
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:45 
4:45
Nora - EarlyWord: 
One of our First Flights members, Kimberly McGee, posted a review of LOST & FOUND on Edelweiss and gave us permission to use it here:
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:45 Nora - EarlyWord
4:46
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:46 
4:53
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I see chat participants gathering!

You can send your questions through at any time (even now). They'll go into a queue, and we'll submit as many of them as we can to Brooke before the end of the chat.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:53 Nora - EarlyWord
4:55
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Please don’t worry about typos – we’ll make them too!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 4:55 Nora - EarlyWord
5:00
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Brooke has joined us from Perth Australia, where it’s very early in the morning. Please say hi, Brooke!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:00 Nora - EarlyWord
5:00
Brooke Davis: 
Hello! Thanks so much for having me!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:00 Brooke Davis
5:01
[Comment From Julie P.Julie P.: ] 
Hi Brooke! Loved the book.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Julie P.
5:01
[Comment From Happy BookerHappy Booker: ] 
Thanks for doing this, Brooke! I must be early in Australia.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Happy Booker
5:01
[Comment From JaniceJanice: ] 
Hi! from Montana!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Janice
5:01
[Comment From Mike D.Mike D.: ] 
Ready for a fun chat!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Mike D.
5:01
[Comment From Galley HoundGalley Hound: ] 
Like Karl, I'm here!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Galley Hound
5:01
[Comment From Agatha & MillieAgatha & Millie: ] 
we're here, too!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Agatha & Millie
5:01
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 
Hi from Connecticut!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Guest
5:01
[Comment From LynneLynne: ] 
Loved the book so much that I am re-reading it.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Lynne
5:01
[Comment From BethMills2BethMills2: ] 
Hello from NY
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 BethMills2
5:01
Brooke Davis: 
Thank you all for joining me. So lovely to see you all here! It's a very early, sunny morning here in Perth.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:01 Brooke Davis
5:02
Brooke Davis: 
I'm trying to channel Karl the Touch Typist this morning.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:02 Brooke Davis
5:02
Nora - EarlyWord: 
We've got some questions holding in the queue, but I'm going to start with a few of my own.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:02 Nora - EarlyWord
5:02
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Your bio says you’ve worked as a bookseller. Pretend LOST & FOUND was written by someone else (if you can). How would you handsell it?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:02 Nora - EarlyWord
5:03
Brooke Davis: 
Oh my gosh! That's a difficult one to start with. I'm so terrible at selling my own book. I still work as a bookseller, but don't have to handsell it at all because all my colleagues don't really let anyone leave the store without a copy of it! ...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:03 Brooke Davis
5:04
[Comment From Stephanie KrasnerStephanie Krasner: ] 
Great question Nora. I am a librarian and love to hear how someone would handsell or hand recommend a book.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:04 Stephanie Krasner
5:04
Brooke Davis: 
Having said that, whenever I’m at the hairdresser, or the doctors, or talking to a person on the bus, when they find out I’ve written a book and they ask me what it’s about, I say something like this: It’s a road trip story, set mainly in Western Australia, from the point of view of three different characters—a little girl, and two elderly people—all of whom have lost someone they’ve loved.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:04 Brooke Davis
5:05
Nora - EarlyWord: 
That leads nicely into the following question …
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:05 Nora - EarlyWord
5:05
[Comment From AndreaAndrea: ] 
I'm interested in how you wrote from the perspective of a 7 year old female and an 87 year old male. Two completely different ages and voices. Can you tell me more about this?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:05 Andrea
5:06
Brooke Davis: 
That's a great question! ...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:06 Brooke Davis
5:07
Brooke Davis: 
The voice of 7 year-old Millie came so naturally to me--not sure if that's because I'm still a 7 year-old at heart!!--but it was the first voice that came to me after my mother died. That makes sense to me--I think we do get a bit childlike when we're grieving, and she allowed me to ask those really thorny questions that adults are sometimes as little afraid to ask...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:07 Brooke Davis
5:09
Brooke Davis: 
And the elderly voice seemed natural as well, in the end--if I was trying to ask questions about the Way Things Are, then perhaps it would be best suited to giving those questions to a position within the culture that is seen to be invisible, just like a child, really. I'm not sure if you feel that things are the same in the States, but I definitely feel that in Australia we don't listen to our elderly enough. I wanted to give them a voice, and it seemed perfect for the subject matter.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:09 Brooke Davis
5:10
[Comment From Mike D.Mike D.: ] 
One part I found so moving -- the list of things Karl , who is now old, wishes he could do. It’s like poetry.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:10 Mike D.
5:10
Brooke Davis: 
Thank you, Mike! That's such a lovely thing to say.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:10 Brooke Davis
5:10
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Thanks for mentioning that, Mike - it's one of my favorite bits, too, so I copied out the text …
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:10 Nora - EarlyWord
5:11
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Karl wanted to feel again. He want to walk onto a crowded bus and make eye contact with a woman with brown hair, blond hair, blue hair – just hair would be enough – and feel that flip in his stomach, that nice hurt. He wanted to laugh loudly, to lean over his knees with it, to throw grapes at someone, to sit in a mud puddle, to yell things anythings, it didn’t matter. He wanted to pull down a woman’s skirt, to sit on the bonnet of a moving car, to wear shorts, to eat which is mouth open. …
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:11 Nora - EarlyWord
5:11
Brooke Davis: 
I wonder if we all feel a bit like that sometimes, no matter how old we are, that feeling that time is passing us by, that we're always remembering instead of doing.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:11 Brooke Davis
5:12
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 
I don’t have a question but wanted to share my initial experience reading Lost & Found. First let me preface this story with the fact that I am a parochial high school librarian. The morning that I received your book I happened to be in need of something to read. I took it with me to the cafeteria and began reading, and laughing. Finally a teacher sitting next to me asked what I was reading so I started reading it aloud to her. Soon she began to laugh too. The way the parents describes heaven, who goes where and why was absolutely hysterical. I finally had to go back to the library because I couldn’t contain my giggles. I wanted to adopt Millie.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:12 Dawn
5:12
[Comment From bookclubreaderbookclubreader: ] 
The voice of each character was very authentic. I was amazed at some of the comments made by the older characters--I kept wondering how you were able to be so perceptive.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:12 bookclubreader
5:13
Brooke Davis: 
Dawn, that has made my morning!! I wish I was there! Thank you for sharing that with me.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:13 Brooke Davis
5:14
[Comment From Mike D.Mike D.: ] 
Good point, Brooke -- We shouldn't think of older people as being so different!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:14 Mike D.
5:15
[Comment From bookclubreaderbookclubreader: ] 
The characters reminded that life is meant to be an adventure--it isn't perfect, and it's often messy..?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:15 bookclubreader
5:15
Brooke Davis: 
'bookclubreader'--thank you for saying that. I definitely have been very close to my grandparents. I haven't always been interested in what they have to say but as I've gotten older, I have listened more. And as I said earlier, I realise that we all need to listen more...

I have one grandparent 'left'--my 90 year-old Nan, who, of course isn't what she used to be, but when I look at her, and when I talk to her, I know that her and I are not that much different. I can also tell that she doesn't feel much different from me. She misses her mum, and feels like a small child sometimes, too, just like I do. And yet, she’s 90, and I’m 35. I'm just not sure that we change that much on the inside.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:15 Brooke Davis
5:15
Brooke Davis: 
Mike, you read my mind! :)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:15 Brooke Davis
5:16
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 
I would handsell it by comparing to movies like Big Fish or mr magorium's magic emporium. M's imagination is like a road trip inside a road trip
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:16 Dawn
5:17
Brooke Davis: 
bookclubreader-- EXACTLY. I'm not sure when someone decided that sadness--and all the messiness--wasn't a part of life. I think it might be a bit dangerous and not good for us to be sold the story that we need to aspire to some sort of perfect, neverending happiness.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:17 Brooke Davis
5:18
Brooke Davis: 
Thanks, Dawn--I love that!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:18 Brooke Davis
5:18
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 
You're welcome! Any plans to have book signings in New Zealand? I'll be there in July.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:18 Dawn
5:19
Brooke Davis: 
Oh, wow! How exciting for you. I hope so. I might actually be in Europe then, though! Hopefully one day. I will be coming to the States this January, though!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:19 Brooke Davis
5:19
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Is your U.S. tour set? Can we find the schedule online?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:19 Nora - EarlyWord
5:21
Brooke Davis: 
Not yet! I’ll be receiving my schedule sometime this week, so will know more soon. I’m heading to Vancouver in Canada for the Christmas holidays—my brother lives there, and I’m hoping so much to get a white Christmas! I’ve never had one—and then I’ll be touring Canada and the U.S. in January. I'll put it up on my facebook page as soon as I know it!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:21 Brooke Davis
5:21
[Comment From LilyLily: ] 
Was writing the book therapeutic - did it help you deal with your own grief?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:21 Lily
5:21
[Comment From Kimberly McGeeKimberly McGee: ] 
Having Technical issues but I can enjoy catching up
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:21 Kimberly McGee
 
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Hey, Kimberly -- glad you made it!
  Nora - EarlyWord
5:22
Brooke Davis: 
Lovely question, Lily, thank you! It was the perfect avenue for me to be able to keep grieving/thinking about my mum in a way that was socially and culturally permissible...

Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:22 Brooke Davis
5:23
Brooke Davis: 
I was able to keep her close to me without anyone thinking I was too weird, or not 'moving on'. And that made me relax about the concept of 'moving on', and it also made me realise that I didn’t actually have to. It also gave me the chance to think deeply about what it means to grieve on a broader scale, which made me feel less alone. It was the most perfect thing for me to do at that time. I’m so grateful for it...

Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:23 Brooke Davis
5:23
Brooke Davis: 
I’ve always tried to be open, authentic and honest about my grief. I don’t want to hide it and I want to be kind to myself about it. If I’m having a ‘bad day’, I try to give myself the space and time to feel it. Those days remind me that my mum existed once, and they’re important for me.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:23 Brooke Davis
5:24
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Interesting, because your characters behave in many inappropriate ways -- is that your way of protesting the requirement to grieve "appropriately"?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:24 Nora - EarlyWord
5:24
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I particularly loved the part when Agatha threw all the food people brought after her husband died onto the lawn. So liberating!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:24 Nora - EarlyWord
5:25
[Comment From LilyLily: ] 
I think the book will help other people who are grieving find a way to deal with theirs in a way they might not have thought about.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:25 Lily
5:26
Brooke Davis: 
Definitely! I’ve thought really deeply about the way we as a society put silences on death and grief, and how we pretend it doesn’t happen, and how suggest that there are 'appropriate' and 'inappropriate' ways to do it...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:26 Brooke Davis
5:26
Brooke Davis: 
I think it makes us feel like grieving and sadness are abnormal states, and make us feel pressure to ‘move on’ and achieve ‘closure’. This is an important topic: if we’re on earth long enough, we will all experience the death of someone close, and we will all grieve. This is something that we all share. What we might not share is the way we work through this grief, and how we think about death. I don’t believe this is something that we should judge each other about. We all work through this stuff differently, and we need to take the time to understand this about one another...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:26 Brooke Davis
5:27
[Comment From bookclubreaderbookclubreader: ] 
As Your characters evolved they also reminded me that it's important to acknowledge your feelings rather than remaining numb, to embrace the future, whatever it holds, and let go of the past..
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:27 bookclubreader
5:27
Brooke Davis: 
Ha, thank you, Nora!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:27 Brooke Davis
5:28
Brooke Davis: 
Lily-- thanks for saying that--you have no idea how much a comment like that means to me. :)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:28 Brooke Davis
5:28
Nora - EarlyWord: 
In your acknowledgments, you say the book was written as a PhD thesis on grief. We tend to think of PhD. theses as pretty dry. How did yours become a novel?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:28 Nora - EarlyWord
5:28
Brooke Davis: 
bookclubreader--I love that thought. Thank you.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:28 Brooke Davis
5:29
Brooke Davis: 
Yes I did write it as a PhD here in Perth at Curtin University...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:29 Brooke Davis
5:30
Brooke Davis: 
But it was a creative writing PhD, so essentially you have one research question (in my case, it was something about different representations of grief in literature), and you answer it in a creative way and a theoretical way...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:30 Brooke Davis
5:31
Brooke Davis: 
So I wrote a novel and a big essay to accompany it that explored all the psychology around grief, as well as some of contemporary representations of it...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:31 Brooke Davis
5:31
Nora - EarlyWord: 
What an interesting program -- kind of right brain, left brain.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:31 Nora - EarlyWord
5:32
Brooke Davis: 
It was actually a fantastic way to give myself permission to write a novel, as I was lucky enough to get a scholarship, and so could treat it like a job for a few years. Plus, I had mentors and immediate peers who were doing the same thing. It was a fantastic, structured way for me to do it.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:32 Brooke Davis
5:32
[Comment From AndreaAndrea: ] 
I'm interested in knowing a little more about the way you formatted the book with chapters titles and then so many sub-titles or sections. Why did you choose that format giving us a header for each section?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:32 Andrea
5:32
Brooke Davis: 
Yes, Nora! Exactly. Worked really well for me. Though I was a little weary of the academic language by the end of it all! Happy to be finished.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:32 Brooke Davis
5:34
Brooke Davis: 
Good question, Andrea, thank you. I think it started off as signposts I was doing for myself in the early drafting stage, and then I just never cut them out. I liked how they helped to guide the reader through the story, and the tone of it. So I kept them! :)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:34 Brooke Davis
5:35
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 
I was thinking of recommending L&F to the psychology teacher at my school. How would you promote your book to a high school teacher to use in class or as a summer reading assignment?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:35 Dawn
5:38
Brooke Davis: 
Hmm. Good question, Dawn! I've actually been really surprised that here in Australia a lot of young teenage girls are reading it. I always ask them what they like about it, and some of them say 'the love story'! Which I'm amazed by, because I thought a love story between two elderly people wouldn't be high on the list for teenage girls!! And so many of the girls seem to really identify with Millie.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:38 Brooke Davis
5:39
Brooke Davis: 
I'm not sure that answers your question! If you come up with an idea, let me know! :)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:39 Brooke Davis
5:39
[Comment From AndreaAndrea: ] 
I especially liked that you could bring humor into the book. Having recently lost both my parents ( within 5 months of each other) this books was especially me meaningful and I appreciated the humor. Not only having to deal with their deaths, but all the legal work that goes with it, I loved it when someone made me laugh and see joy.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:39 Andrea
5:42
Brooke Davis: 
Andrea--I am so, so sorry to hear about your parents. Thank you so much for saying that about my book. It really is so ridiculous how difficult all that bureaucracy stuff makes a sad, difficult thing, much harder. They should be making it easier!! ...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:42 Brooke Davis
5:42
[Comment From bookclubreaderbookclubreader: ] 
Adding to Andrea's comment, you've addressed many of life's big issues: love, loss, abandonment, death, and new beginnings in very touching ways. I think this will strike a chord with many readers.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:42 bookclubreader
5:43
Brooke Davis: 
I remember when my mum died, we were trying to do all the little things like get the electricity into her name, etc, and all these companies kept sending us forms that required her signature!!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:43 Brooke Davis
5:43
[Comment From Mike D.Mike D.: ] 
Why did the characters keep writing on things that they were there? Did they feel overlooked?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:43 Mike D.
5:43
Brooke Davis: 
bookclubreader--thank you! I hope so.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:43 Brooke Davis
5:43
[Comment From AndreaAndrea: ] 
Perfect book for book clubs.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:43 Andrea
5:44
Brooke Davis: 
Mike--I think so, definitely. I think both the very young and the very old often feel invisible in their position within society. But I also think that we all feel a bit that way, sometimes.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:44 Brooke Davis
5:45
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Gotta point out that LOST & FOUND was a #1 best seller list in Australia.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:45 Nora - EarlyWord
5:45
Brooke Davis: 
Andrea--thank you--I've been visiting a few here in Australia, and the conversations we've had have been incredible. I've felt very lucky.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:45 Brooke Davis
5:45
Nora - EarlyWord
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:45 
5:46
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Take a look at the other books on the list.

Pretty impressive!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:46 Nora - EarlyWord
5:46
Brooke Davis: 
Oh, that was so exciting! I couldn't believe it. My publisher here was really good at getting it in to the hands of the indie booksellers before it went to print. They really got behind it over here, which I’m hugely grateful for.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:46 Brooke Davis
5:46
[Comment From Janet SJanet S: ] 
This will be a perfect book club discussion--provocative and timely. I enjoyed the structure.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:46 Janet S
5:46
[Comment From Kimberly McGeeKimberly McGee: ] 
I agree! I was thinking of suggesting it to two or three of our library book clubs. It promotes a lot of discussion points
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:46 Kimberly McGee
5:47
Brooke Davis: 
Thank you, Janet & Kimberly!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:47 Brooke Davis
5:47
Nora - EarlyWord: 
It's also done well in other countries, right?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:47 Nora - EarlyWord
5:48
Brooke Davis: 
It's been picked up in about 25 other countries, but it's only come out in Australia so far! The US, Canada and the UK will be the first to release it outside of Australia. So, fingers crossed! :)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:48 Brooke Davis
5:48
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Were you surprised that it got picked up so widely?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:48 Nora - EarlyWord
5:49
Brooke Davis: 
Absolutely!! I've been so surprised that people in other countries understand it. When I was writing it, I thought it was this very weird little Australian book about topics no one wants to ever talk about! ...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:49 Brooke Davis
5:50
Brooke Davis: 
As I said before, I work in a bookshop here in Australia, and have done for about ten years. It’s been such a great way to get an insight into the industry—it’s helped me to understand how difficult it is not only to get published, but to also understand how difficult it is to get your book read even after it’s been published. There are so many books! I know that I need to keep my expectations about my own work in that world really, very low. ! It’s helpful, because any ‘win’ is a surprise.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:50 Brooke Davis
5:51
Nora - EarlyWord: 
That's so funny that you thought it was specifically Australian -- as you can tell by the reactions here, people think the themes are universal.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:51 Nora - EarlyWord
5:51
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I was only brought up short by a few specific references (what is Boron -- do I have that right? Agatha drinks it but then throws it down the sink)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:51 Nora - EarlyWord
5:52
Brooke Davis: 
Yeah--grief and death and joy are all things we share, for sure...
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:52 Brooke Davis
5:52
Brooke Davis: 
Haha, oh that's funny. It's actually 'Bonox', and is this terrible, awful drink that tastes like liquid Vegemite, that lots of people of my grandparents era drank during war time! You really don't want to try that stuff.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:52 Brooke Davis
5:52
Nora - EarlyWord: 
I just looked at the time -- we only have a few minutes left. Get your final question in, everyone!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:52 Nora - EarlyWord
5:53
[Comment From DawnDawn: ] 
Any plans for creating a book club reading guide for L&F?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:53 Dawn
5:53
[Comment From AndreaAndrea: ] 
You have all of us to promote it!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:53 Andrea
5:53
[Comment From Galley HoundGalley Hound: ] 
How did you come up with the title?
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:53 Galley Hound
5:54
Brooke Davis: 
Dawn, there is actually one at the back of the Australian version--I'm not sure if they are including it in the U.S. version? If not, you're welcome to get in touch with me (via facebook is probably the easiest way), and I can definitely send it to you. :)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:54 Brooke Davis
5:54
Brooke Davis: 
Andrea--thank you!!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:54 Brooke Davis
5:55
[Comment From PamelaPamela: ] 
Everyone -- be sure to read the acknowledgments -- they say so much about who Brooke is!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:55 Pamela
5:56
[Comment From Janet SJanet S: ] 
It's a lovely book and just a great read.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:56 Janet S
5:56
[Comment From StephanieStephanie: ] 
Just wanted to add that I can't wait to have a bookclub read and discussion. It would be extremely appropriate to our patrons.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:56 Stephanie
5:56
Brooke Davis: 
Galley Hound--It's funny, it was always going to be a working title. It was just the first title I thought of--it seemed to tie into the themes really well. I didn't love it, and fully expected the publishers to want to change it, but they liked it! So it just stuck. I like the simplicity of it, though--especially working as a bookseller, I know readers sometimes find it hard to remember the titles of books--it makes it easy to remember!!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:56 Brooke Davis
5:57
Brooke Davis: 
Pamela--thank you, I feel a bit embarrassed about how long they are!! :)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:57 Brooke Davis
5:57
Brooke Davis: 
Thank you Janet and Stephanie!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:57 Brooke Davis
5:57
Brooke Davis: 
And thanks everyone for joining me--had a ball. Hopefully get to meet you one day.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:57 Brooke Davis
5:57
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Wow, everyone, that’s nearly it for this chat. The hour flew by. Thanks, Brooke for all your insights. Amazing for so early in the morning your time (it’s tomorrow where she is, folks)
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:57 Nora - EarlyWord
5:58
Brooke Davis: 
Yes, I'm in the future!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:58 Brooke Davis
5:58
Nora - EarlyWord: 
And thanks to the Penguin First Flights program members for joining us today. The chat will be posted in our archives.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:58 Nora - EarlyWord
5:58
Brooke Davis: 
Thanks again, everyone, and to Nora for facilitating.
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:58 Brooke Davis
5:59
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Our next chat, on Jan. 21, is with M.O. Walsh, author of My Sunshine Away – read about it here
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:59 Nora - EarlyWord
5:59
Nora - EarlyWord: 
Goodbye, everyone! Keep on reading!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:59 Nora - EarlyWord
5:59
Brooke Davis: 
Bye, everyone!
Wednesday December 3, 2014 5:59 Brooke Davis
 
 

GalleyChatter:
TRUE CONFESSIONS

Monday, November 24th, 2014

Editor’s Note: Our intrepid GalleyChatter (some call her the “Galley Whisperer”) Robin Beerbower, wrangled the many titles librarians were enthusiastic about during the most recent session of GalleyChat, to give you titles to add to your own TBR pile (remember to nominate your favorites for LibraryReads). Many of these are available for free download via Edelweiss and NetGalley.

————-

This month’s GalleyChat became hot and heavy when the discussion turned to romance novels. The resulting list of forthcoming titles, along with the authors’ backlists, will help collection development librarians keep romance loving patrons satisfied.

From romance, we then turned to a more sinister subjects, learning about some compelling stories of murder and conspiracies.

If you missed the chat or couldn’t keep up with the 300 plus tweets, check here for the complete list of books discussed.

Romance, Mostly Regency

Deb Margeson (Douglas County Librariers, CO) a Regency romance fan, was enthusiastic about her latest find, also a November LibraryReads pick,  Never Judge a Lady by Her Cover by Sarah MacLean (HarperCollins/Avon, November), saying it was “great escapist fun.” MacLean is clearly an author to know. Her earlier book, No Good Duke Goes Unpunished was the #1 Dec. 2013 LibraryReads pick.

Another Regency fan, Jane Jorgenson of Madison (WI) Public Library chimed in with her new favorite,  It Started With a Scandal, by Julie Anne Long (HarperCollins/Avon, March), the tenth in The Pennyroyal Green series, set during the long-running fictional feud of two wealthy families in Sussex.

Vicki Nesting (St. Charles Parish Library, LA) is now hooked on the sub-genre and her latest find is the sequel Tessa Dare’s Say Yes to the Marquess, (HarperCollins/Avon, December), the sequel to Romancing the Duke. That discovery is seconded by many librarians from around the country, showing massive love on Edelweiss for this title. Vicki also enjoyed Earls Just Want to Have Fun by Shana Galen (Sourcebooks/Casablanca, February). And to round out our round-up of regency romances, Stephanie Chase (Hillsboro Public Library, Oregon) recommended books by two big names in the field, Julia Quinn’s The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy, and Eloisa James’ Four Nights with the Duke (HarperCollins/Avon, March). A side note of interest, James, an English lit professor, is the daughter of poet Robert Bly and short-story author Carol Bly and is married to an Italian knight.

For a modern vibe, Grace Burrowes, who usually writes historical romances, has three titles in the Sweetest Kisses series coming out in early 2015. New Rochelle (NY) Public Library’s Beth Mills said she enjoyed the first, A Single Kiss (Sourcebooks/Casablanca, January) so much that she immediately downloaded the next two, First Kiss and Kiss Me Hello.

The Darker Side

9780812995442_bf2c2 9780812997538_98877

But then the conversation turned to the darker side of love. Jill Alexander Essbaum’s Hausfrau (RH, March) is centered around a wife and mother who is falling apart despite having the perfect life. Last August Elliott Bay Bookstore staff member Kenny Coble teased us saying, “It is brave and vulnerable and a little inappropriate (don’t tell mom),” and Jenne Bergstrom from San Diego County Library said “it grabbed onto me HARD.” Another book about desire and obsession receiving attention is Jan Ellison’s A Small Indiscretion (RH, January).  Adrienne Cruz, librarian from Azusa (CA) Library says, “Annie is a complex character. The narration is written as if she were talking to her comatose son — a confessional almost. The treatment coupled with bold and richly-layered characters result in a satisfying debut.”

Murder and Mayhem

9781616954765_d0d69  cold-betrayal-9781476745046  9781250056450

On to murder and mayhem. Inspired by a true event in a Utah Mormon community, The Bishop’s Wife, by Mette Ivie Harrison (Soho Crime, December) has seen much love over the past few GalleyChats. Vicki Nesting said,While not strictly a mystery, this book will appeal to readers who enjoyed the introspective investigation at the heart of Reconstructing Amelia.

Robin Nesbitt, readers’ advisor at Metropolis Columbia (OH) Library loved A Murder of Magpies, Judith Flanders (Macmillan/Minotaur, February), saying “What’s not to love – mystery, publishing, London!  Judith Flanders nails it with a funny protagonist who happens to be a book editor in London.  Bibliophiles will love this.” J.A. Jance is well known for her two series featuring J. P. Beaumont and Johanna Brady, but the lesser known Ali Reynolds series is starting to gain ground. Beth Mills was pleased that Jance is in her usual great form with Cold Betrayal (S&S/Touchstone, March), the tenth entry in the Reynolds series.

9781250045423  fifth-gospel-9781451694147_lg

Two exceptional espionage titles were mentioned, All the Old Knives, Olen Steinhauer (Macmillan/Minotaur, March), and The Fifth Gospel, Ian Caldwell (S&S, March).  “A fun and twisty read” is Janet Lockhart’s  (Wake County Public Libraries, NC) description of the Steinhauer story about former lovers who reunite to reminisce about old times as spies. Caldwell’s Vatican-based thriller was compared to those by Dan Brown, Daniel Silva and Iain Pears.

For more raves about forthcoming titles, join our next chat on December 2, 4:00-5:00 (EST). To keep up with what I’m anticipating on Edelweiss, please “friend me.”