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YA GalleyChat, Tuesday, Nov. 18

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

Join us for the next Y.A. GalleyChat, Tuesday, Dec. 16, 5 to 6 p.m. (4:30 for virtual cocktails)


Quammen on Ebola

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

In her Library News email last week, Golda Rademacher, Norton’s Library Marketing Manager, alerted librarians to the following drop-in title:

9780393351552_5bc5bEbola: The Natural and Human History of a Deadly Virus
DAVID QUAMMEN
9780393351552, pbk, $13.95
NORTON, 10/20/14

With all the news about Ebola lately, we had a lot of requests for the Ebola chapter from David Quammen’s Spillover. We’ve pulled the chapter out and are publishing it as a paperback with some updates and a new introduction by the author.

In today’s New York Times, Michiko Kakutani reviews it, saying that Quammen warns readers not to take Richard Preston’s “lurid descriptions of Ebola’s consequences literally” in his best selling book, The Hot Zone. Nevertheless, Quammen ” shows in these pages that the reality of the virus is horrifying without any apocalyptic embellishment.”

Kakutani also mention journalist Laurie Garrett’s  “illuminating and encyclopedic book The Coming Plague” (Penguin Books).

That’s STEVE CARRELL?

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

We’ve become so used to the goofy Steve Carrell, on full display in theaters now as the dad in Alexander And The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, that it may be difficult to believe that same guy plays billionaire John du Pont in this trailer.

The movie, which opens on Nov. 14, is generating Oscar buzz, (read what the cast members, including Vanessa Redgrave, have to say about it here).

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It is based on the forthcoming hardcover

Foxcatcher: The True Story of My Brother’s Murder, John du Pont’s Madness, and the Quest for Olympic Gold, by Mark Schultz, and David Thomas

(Penguin/Dutton, 11/18)

WONDER Has Director

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Wonder Lionsgate has announced that John Krokidas (Kill Your Darlings, 2013) will direct the film adaptation of the word-of-mouth debut hit Wonder, R.J. Palacio, (RH/ Knopf Young Readers)

The book is still #1 on the NYT Middle Grade Best Sellers list after 96 weeks. Entertainment Weekly predicts the movie will also be successful, saying it’s “bound to be the latest in a string of enormously successful YA adaptations,” (presumably, referring to what Hollywood now calls “grounded” Y.A. adaptations, like The Fault in Our Stars and If I Stay, rather than the dystopian hits).

The big question: how will the movie deal with the main character’s facial deformity?

The trailer for the book avoided the issue:

8 Titles to Make You An R.A. Guru — Week of 8/18

Friday, August 15th, 2014

The watchword for next week is “family sagas” as  two heavily-promoted titles arrive, one a debut and the other by a veteran returning to the genre she abandoned for decades.  Also on their way are several more to recommend, including 3 LibraryReads picks.

NOTE: To make you even more knowledgable, now you can read samples of these books via our links to OverDrive’s new Readbox system

The titles listed here, plus several other notable books arriving next week are listed on our downloadable spreadsheet, New Title Radar, Week of 8/18, with ordering information as well as alternative formats.

Family Sagas

Thorn_Bords_bookcover  9781476755410_e394a  9781476756660_e9693

Bittersweet, Colleen McCullough, (S&S) — OverDrive Sample

Back in the late ’70’s, Colleen McCullough’s Thorn Birds, became a best seller, propelled to further success by a blockbuster TV series. A generational saga set in Australia, the author drew on her own family background for the story.

She has written over 20 books since, a series of historical novels set in classical Rome and another series of detective stories, but, as the 76-year-old author told an interviewer last year, she was uncomfortable returning to the genre that won her the most success. She’s overcome that for her new book, being promoted as her “first epic romantic novel since Thorn Birds” (you can almost hear the publisher cheering). McCullough, however, insists the two stories are not at all alike.  Prepub reviews are strong, and People magazine chooses it as their “Book of the Week.” Holds are relatively light.

We Are Not Ourselves, Matthew Thomas,  (S&S; S&S Audio)
— OverDrive Sample

A debut, this novel was heavily promoted at Book Expo. It’s the featured title in the book section of the new issue of  Entertainment Weekly, with the reviewer calling it an “absolutely devastating family saga … the best I’ve read since The Corrections.”  EW goes on to chart “25 First-Rate Family Sagas” beginning with War and Peace, through The Thorn Birds, and ending with Philipp Meyer’s The Son(HarperCollins/Ecco, 2013).

LibraryReads Picks

9781476749785_a7da7  9780062259301_9efaf  9780062306814_315ff

One Kick, Chelsea Cain, (S&S) — OverDrive Sample

The #1 LibraryReads pick for August:

“Kick Lannigan survived being kidnapped as a child. Now, at twenty-one, determined never to be a victim again, she has reinvented herself. Martial arts and weapons handling are just a few of the skills she has learned over the years. Kick catches the attention of John Bishop, a mystery man with access to unlimited funds, and together they go after a cabal of child pornographers. A read-in-one-sitting, edge-of-your-seat thriller.” — Elizabeth Kanouse, Denville Public Library, Denville, NJ

The Story Hour, Thrity Umrigar, (Harper; Dreamscape audio) — OverDrive sample

“Another beautifully written novel by Thrity Umrigar. A relationship develops between Maggie, a psychologist, and Lakshmi, a troubled Indian woman. As their stories develop, it is hard to figure out which woman does more to impact the other’s life. Highly recommended.” Ellen Firer, Merrick Library, Merrick, NY

The Miniaturist, Jessie Burton, (HarperCollins/Ecco; HarperLuxe) — OverDrive sample

“A dollhouse whose figures and furnishings foretell life events, mysterious notes, family secrets and the powerful guild and church of 1686 Amsterdam. All these elements combine for an engaging story of a young bride’s struggle to be the ‘architect of her own fortune.’” — Elizabeth Angelastro, Manlius Library, Manlius, NY

This also gets an A-, in Entertainment Weekly.

Lisa Von Drasek’s Adult Pick

9780385538138_7ec07-2Dear Committee Members, Julie Schumacher, (RH Doubleday; BOT) — OverDrive sample

As we reported earlier, EarlyWord Kids Correspondent, Lisa Von Drasek is a big fan of this humorous novel told in the form of letters of recommendation written by one world-weary academic. NPR backs her up, calling it “hilarious.” Try the OverDrive sample; you’ll find yourself reading it aloud to anyone who will listen (and even to those who won’t).

In the Media

9780316278751_ed726   9780871403148_473fa

Sticker from The Colbert Report web site

Colbert Bump

Sweetness #9 , Stephan Eirik Clark, (Hachette/Little, Brown) — OverDrive sample

After making a NYT best seller of Edan Lepucki’s California, Stephen Colbert urges readers to buy this debut published by Hachette, just not from Amazon.

Entertainment Weekly gives it just a B-, but the Huffington Post picks it as “The Book We’re Talking About” this week.

NYT Book Review cover

Kill My Mother : A Graphic Novel, Jules Feiffer, (Norton/Liveright)

Reviewed by Laura Lippman in Sunday’s NYT BR, this is also an NPR “Exclusive First Read

 

Get Your LibraryReads Picks!

Monday, July 14th, 2014

LibraryReads FavoriteLibraryReads FavoriteLibraryReads FavoriteLibraryReads FavoriteLibraryReads Favorite9781476749785_a7da7    LibraryReads Favorite

Today’s release of the LibraryReads list of the ten books librarians love the most for the month of August, is a reminder to get your nominations in for the upcoming months (you can nominate titles to be published from September on. Nominations close on the first of each month for titles published in that month —more how-to specifics here).

The new list offers many titles that provide an answer to the eternal question, “What’s coming out that’s good?” Many of these titles will be available as eGalleys on Edelweiss and/or NetGalley until their pub dates, so grab them now.

The number one pick is Chelsea Cain’s thriller, One Kick (S&S;
S&S Audio; Wheeler Large Print; eGalley available), the beginning of a new series for Cain (she still plans to continue the popular and scary Gretchen Lowell series, alternating between the two). NBC announced in October that it is developing a series based on the new titles about a woman who, having been abducted herself as a child, works to rescue other kidnapped kids.

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Most of the titles come from well-known names, but this list also includes a debut, the historical novel The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton (HarperCollins/Ecco; HarperLuxe; eGalley available) which was featured at the BEA Editor’s buzz Panel. Set in 17th C Amsterdam, it is compared to the best of Sarah Waters and Emma Donoghue.

9781400067244_c6788Also resonating from BEA, Lucky Us by Amy Bloom (Random House; RH Audio, eGalley available on request), who won over the crowd at the  Random House Librarians Breakfast with her tales of growing up in a library (with a very understanding librarian) and her description of the sources for the female friendship at the center of her new book.

The full list offers suggestions for a wide range of tastes, from historical to romance, science fiction, and literary titles.

Also, check our compilation of all the lists since LibraryReads began last September, LibraryReads-All-Lists-Through-Aug-2014, Sort it by category and you’ll have an instant list to use when you’re stuck trying to recommend a recent book in a particular category, or for creating displays.

Titles to Know, Next Week, 6/16 to 6/20/14

Friday, June 13th, 2014

The Silkworm  All Fall Down  Top Secret Twenty One

Amazon’s resolve to discourage customers from buying Hachette titles will be put to the test next week with the arrival of The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith (Hachette/Mulholland Books; Hachette Audio; Hachette Large Print). Libraries have ordered plenty of copies to fill heavy holds on this sequel to The Cuckoo’s Calling, (both actually written by J.K. Rowling, of course). Rivaling The Silkworm in number of holds is Jennifer Weiner’s All Fall Down (S&S/Atria; S&S Audio) a novel about the serious subject of addiction. Watch for Weiner on the Today Show on release day, June 17.

Topping both is Janet Evanovich’s latest in her long running Stephanie Plum series, Top Secret Twenty-One, (RH/Bantam; RH Audio; RH Large Print).

All the titles mentioned here, plus a few more, are listed with ordering information and alternative formats on our downloadable New Title Radar, Week of 6/16/14

To Recommend

Amazon is promoting Summer House with Swimming Pool to people who want The Silkworm. In libraries, it already has fairly strong holds queues, so you may not want to follow suit. The following titles show fewer holds despite great advance excitement, offering good alternatives (and one is from Hachette).

The QuickThe Quick, Lauren Owen, (Random House; BOT)

A debut that has inspired a great deal of passion among librarians on GalleyChat and is a LibraryReads pick for June:

“This book starts out slowly, with an unconventional Victorian-era romance and builds to an unexpected development by the end of part one. Owen continues the slow boil of suspense with a curiously-enticing plot, centering on members of an exclusive London gentleman’s club who are testing the boundaries of their own organization. For those who enjoy historical fiction with a twist.” — Lucy Lockley, St. Charles City-County Library, St. Peters, MO

9780316231053_8f192The Fever, Megan Abbott, (Hachette/Little, Brown)

The seventh novel by an novelist with a growing reputation has inspired comments like this in Slate — “Megan Abbott is the kind of author whose books, once you’ve discovered them, present an immediate dilemma: You want to read them all, one right after the other, in hopes of prolonging the spell, yet you also become consumed with the need to hold one or two titles on her backlist in reserve, so you can be assured there will always be one yet to come.” People magazine described the story in their “Great Summer Reads,” roundup, “In Abbott’s affecting seventh novel, a mysterious affliction suddenly spreading among teenage girls shakes a community to its core.”

That NightThat Night, Chevy Stevens, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s. Macmillan Audio; Thorndike)

GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower calls Stevens her “go-to” author for readers looking for thrillers and adds that her latest is a ” top-notch psychological thriller that was so relentless I had to stop reading a few times to catch my breath.”

 

Media Attention

The Last MagazineThe Last Magazine, Michael Hastings, (Penguin/Blue Rider)

Journalist Michael Hastings was known for his fearlessness. His 2010 Rolling Stone article “The Runaway General” brought down Afghanistan armed forces commander, General Stanley McChrystal. In 2012, he wrote a profile of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for Rolling Stone, newly relevant now that the former POW has been released. Last year, at just 33 years old, Hastings was killed in a single-car crash in Los Angeles, leaving behind a draft of his first novel. New York magazine characterizes it as “a provocative piece of thinly fictionalized nonfiction … a posthumous mission accomplished … [which] tells the story of the run-up to the Iraq War from a perspective that many of his colleagues would like to forget.”

Your Fathers, Where Are They? And The Prophets, Do They Live Forever?, Dave Eggers, (Knopf, RH Audio)

An advance review from the formidable Michiko Kakutani in yesterday’s New York Times, indicates the regard Eggers commands from critics. She is, however, underwhelmed saying this novel, “reads like a skeletal play, written by a journeyman who seems intent on mashing up Samuel Beckett with a straight-to-video thriller about a serial kidnapper.”

Tie-ins

All Together Dead  The Two Faces of January

All Together Dead (TV Tie-In), Charlaine Harris, (Penguin/Ace)

The final 10-episode season of HBO’s True Blood starts a week from Sunday. Some think that’s a good thing (Entertainment Weekly gives the new season a middling B-, even though they see it as an improvement over the previous one). Harris herself has finished with the series, having launched a new one with Midnight Crossroad, (Penguin/Ace). The HBO series has wandered away from the books, so the new series may have little in common with the tie-in.

The Two Faces of January, Patricia Highsmith, (Grove Press)

The latest adaptation of one of Highsmith’s novels opens on August 8, starring Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst. Unfortunately, it will only be in a limited number of theaters, so this may not bring the attention to the author’s work that The Talented Mr. Ripley did, Fortunately, it brings a tie-in of the book that was originally published in 1964, and an opportunity to update your Highsmith collections.

Holds Alert: Capital in the Twenty-First Century

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

We’re feeling French this morning.

Capital in the 21st CA story in the NYT political blog, “The Upshot” reports the French, unlike Americans, have paid little attention to a new book by Paris School of Economics professor Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, (Harvard/Belknap Press, 3/12/14), a nearly 700-page tome modeled on Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations.

Esquire magazine’s blog declares you must read Piketty’s book, “If you want to understand the world, if you want to comprehend the mechanics of the forces shaping our time, if you want to know the political choices we face,” (if you’re not ready for that commitment, you can, however, get the shorthand version from The Guardian).  Paul Krugman adds his kudos to the chorus of praise in the May 8th issue of the New York Review of Books.

The book debuted on the 4/13 NYT Hardcover list at #16, dropped off for a week and is now back at #15. There even seems to be a halo effect; Adam Smith’s 1776 precursor is now at at #19 on the Nonfiction Extended list, 238 years after its original publication.

Holds on Capital are astounding in several libraries we checked and it appears it is currently out of stock at wholesalers.

Thanks to Liam Hagerty of Westcheter P.L. [NY] for the tip. If your library is experiencing unexpected holds on any titles, please email us.

Don’t Weed Yet: ASTRONAUT’S WIVES CLUB

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Astronaut Wives ClubCasting is moving forward for the ABC series based on The Astronaut Wives Club, Lily Koppel’s best-selling book  (Hachette/Grand Central; Hachette Audio and Large Print), about the wives of  of the first U.S. astronauts, published last summer (see our earlier coverage). Currently on board are:

Odette Annable —  Trudy Cooper

Bret Harrison – Gordon “Gordo” Cooper

Dominique McElligott — Louise Shepard

Desmond Harrington — Alan Shepard

JoAnna Garcia Swisher — Betty Grissom

Azure Parsons — Annie Glenn

Zoe Boyle – Jo Schirra

The 10-episode series, to be directed by Nick Cassavetes (The Notebook, My Sister’s Keeper)  is set to begin shooting this fall, to debut midseason, 2014/15.

Peter Matthiessen Dies

Monday, April 7th, 2014

In ParadiseWith a new novel, In Paradise, (Penguin/Riverhead), set for release on Tuesday, Peter Matthiessen died at 86 on Saturday.

Both NPR and the New York Times magazine released profiles of Matthiessen just before the news broke.

Ron Charles, reviewing the new novel in the Washington Post writes, “Like the rest of Matthiessen’s vast body of work, In Paradise leads us into questions that define our most profound mysteries.”

The Los Angeles Times Book Critic, David Ulin, offers his picks of Matthiessen’s over 30 books, “five essential reads and why they matter.”

Live Chat with Nikki Loftin, NIGHTINGALE’S NEST

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

This chat has now ended. To sign up for the program and join future chats, go to the Penguin Young Readers Program.

 

GALLEYCHATTER: Eight Titles To Top Your TBR Pile

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

Editor’s Note: We’re delighted to welcome Robin Beerbower as the regular “GalleyChatter” columnist for EarlyWord. Robin’s day job is as the  readers’ advisor and homebound services coordinator for the Salem [OR] Public Library. She has been a supporter of GalleyChat from its inception, calling those discussions “pure gold for selectors and readers advisors.” She’s enthusiastic about the importance (and fun) of reading books ahead of publication and tirelessly tracks down galleys, making her the local authority on new books. She is also very active on the Edelwiss Community Board, using it to spot titles and gauge developing buzz among librarians (you can join in; just register on Edelweiss and “friend” Robin). She plans to write regular roundups on the titles she discovers through the monthly GalleyChats, with regular updates on books to watch for.

From Robin:
Thanks to everyone on GalleyChat for their warm reception about my contributions to EarlyWord, and thanks to Nora for giving me this opportunity. The chats are  fast and furious with tweets flying everywhere. I’ll do my best to summarize each chat (for a full transcript, check our board on Storify).

GalleyChats are held on Twitter the first Tuesday of each month. The next one is on April 1. Please join us (details here).

Below are the titles that rose to the top of the TBR lists as we chatted last week. If you haven’t received print galleys of these titles, check for e-galleys on NetGalley and Edelweiss.

All The Light We Cannot See   9781616203214_95fa2

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr (Scribner, May 2014; Audio exclusive from MidWest Tape), a historical novel set in occupied France during WWII, received high praise from a couple of chatters including Susan Balla, who called it “A once-in-a-lifetime book.” The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (Algonquin, April 2014), a moving novel set in a small island bookstore, also received an outpouring of love from multiple chatters. Vicki Nesting said she wanted to reread it as soon as she finished, and it has received “Much Love” from 47 peers on Edelweiss. Scroll through those reviews; you’ll be convinced (UPDATE: it’s the #1 title on the just released April LibraryReads list). Selectors, stock up on this one.

Bees Kristi Chadwick said the intriguing novel set in a beehive, The Bees by Laline Paull (HC/Ecco, May 2014), was amazing, and during the January chat, Wilda Williams from Library Journal called it “a Watership Down for insects.”

authorityTwo science fiction/fantasy books received several mentions. The e-galley of Jeff VanderMeer’s second book in the Southern Reach trilogy, Authority (Macmillan/FSG, May 2014), was well received by Megan McArdle, who loved the first book,  Annihilation. The Macmillan rep reported the good news that the third book, Acceptance, will be released next September. Katherine Addison’s The Goblin Emperor (Tor, April 2014) was mentioned by multiple members with Jane Jorgenson saying it was the best fantasy she’s read in years. Addison also writes the Doctrine of Labyrinth series as Sarah Monnette.

Suspense thrillers were popular during the exchange with the third in the Keye Street series, Don’t Talk to Strangers by Amanda Kyle Williams (RH/Bantam, July, 2014), at the top of the list. Jane Jorgenson said  “It’s got good, claustrophobic, small-town feel – kind of reminds me of the mood of  True Detective (love).”  This has been a popular readalike series for Karin Slaughter and Lisa Gardner fans. Chevy Stevens’That Night and Chelsea Cain’s departure from the Sheridan/Lowell series, One Kick,(Simon & Schuster, August 2014) received nods from fans of their earlier books.

life drawing

My personal favorite of the past month was Robin Black’s Life Drawing (RH, July 2014), a gorgeously written suspenseful study of marriage and betrayal. Not exactly a Gone Girl readalike but just as compelling.

If you read any of these mentioned books, please let us know what you enjoyed by either entering your comments below or in Edelweiss.

Happy Reading!

PLA 2014 — The Procrastinator’s Guide

Monday, March 10th, 2014

PLA Logo
PLA Logo

If you’re a procrastinator (and, believe us, we KNOW who you are!), you don’t have time to hunt down dozens of sources to put together your schedule for PLA in Indianapolis.

The major programs are easy; they are on highlighted on PLA’s Daily Schedule, (Ann Patchett! David Sedaris! John Green!) but the session listings can be overwhelming. It helps that you can sort through by keywords and The Readers Advisor offers a handy rundown of R.A. programs.

Below are a our favorites.

Note: We’ve listed the children’s breakfast on Friday first because it REQUIRES advance registration, which you need to do NOW. The rest of our picks are in sequence by day and time.

Friday, March 14, 7:00 am – 8:15 am
Children’s Book And Author Breakfast
Convention Center, Sagamore Ballroom 6-7

Why this belongs on your calendar: For the free breakfast, but more importantly, because it features several children’s and YA superstars, including Rainbow Rowell and William Joyce. Full program listing after the jump. — SEATING IS LIMITED. RSVP HERE NOW. You will receive a confirmation email if there is space.

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Thursday, March 13th 10:45 a.m. – 12 noon
The Best in Debut Authors 
Convention Center, Room #103 – 104

Why this belongs on your calendar: All the authors featured on this panel are being published for the first time this spring, so this is an opportunity to learn about new titles and GET FREE GALLEYS. Several of these authors come with advance buzz. On GalleyChat, we’ve been hearing about  Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler, (St. Martin’s; Macmillan Audio) and we’re particular fans of Natalie Baszile, author of Queen Sugarone of the authors in our Penguin Debut Authors series (check out the enthusiastic Peer Reviews for it on Edelweiss). Full program listing after the jump. — RSVP HERE (for headcount purposes only; seating is not limited, but don’t be angry if you don’t RSVP and they run out of galleys!).

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Thursday, March 13th, 10:45am-12:00 noon
YA Crossover Panel
JW Marriott Indianapolis, White River Ballroom

Why this belongs on your calendar: Aren’t you dying to meet Gene Luen Yang, author of the graphic novel stunner, Boxers & Saints, (Macmillan/First Second), which was on the majority of the year’s best books lists? If that’s not enough, Laurie Halse Anderson is also on the panel. Full program listing after the jump. —  RSVP HERE. (for headcount purposes only; seating is not limited, but don’t be angry if you don’t RSVP and they run out of galleys!).

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Thursday, March 13th, 2:00 – 3:15 pm
ABC – Always Be Circulating: How Public Libraries Meet Demand and Increase Use
Convention Center, 500 Ballroom

Why this belongs on your calendar: The subject and the speakers promise a smash-up program. You’ll learn how to increase circ. through selection, RA and programming from a group of people who have enviable track records in this area — Robin Nesbitt, Wendy Bartlett, Stephanie Chase and Alene Moroni. Full listing in PLA programs.

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Friday, March 14th, 10:45 – 12 noon
Mystery Authors Revealed
Convention Center, Wabash Ballroom 3

Why this belongs on your calendar:  Features he buzzy debut The Weight of Blood by Laura McHugh (RH/Spiegel & Grau, coming out this week, as well as favorite mystery authors Sophie Hannah and Jeff Abbott and FREE GALLEYS. Full program listing after the jump. — RSVP HERE (for headcount purposes only; seating is not limited, but don’t be angry if you don’t RSVP and they run out of galleys!).

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Friday, March 14, 2:00 to 3:15 pm
Doing Time with Sisters in Crime
Convention Center, Wabash Ballroom 3

Why this belongs on your calendar: For that clever title alone, but also to learn about trends in the hottest genre in libraries. This panel includes RA godmother Joyce Saricks and librarian (and GalleyChatter) Lesa Holstine, who writes the influential Lesa’s Book Critiques blog, as well as several Sisters in Crime authors. Full listing in PLA programs.

(more…)

In The Media: REDEPLOYMENT

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

9781594204999Featured on Morning Edition today is former Marine Phil Klay, whose first book, Redeployment, released on Tuesday (Penguin), is a collection of  “a dozen vivid stories about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from the perspectives of the people who experienced it.” (listen to the show here).

The book is also featured on the cover of the upcoming NYT Book Review  (not yet online) and was reviewed by Michiko Kakutani in the daily NYT last week. Entertainment Weekly gave it an unequivocal  A. It comes with advance praise from an impressive range of writers, attesting to both the author’s authenticity and literary abilities, from Anthony Swofford (Jarhead) to  Colum McCann, (Let the Great World Spin).

ON NPR: FIVE CAME BACK

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

9781594204302Featured on Fresh Air yesterday was Mark Harris on his new a book about filmmakers in WWII, Five Came Back: A Story Of Hollywood And The Second World War, (Penguin Press; Recorded Books).

The author describes the shift in relationships between the film business and the U.S. government, “Hollywood and the federal government held a mutual suspicion of each other. But after Pearl Harbor, the War Department asked Hollywood directors to make short documentaries that could be presented in theaters before the featured films … to show Americans what was at stake, give them a glimpse of what our soldiers were going through and stir up patriotic feelings.”
Book of Hours

Coming today on Fresh Air, Kevin Young shares poems from his new collection, Book of Hours, (Knopf) about the death of his father and the birth of his son.