Archive for the ‘Seasons’ Category

Towards More Diverse
LibraryReads Lists

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Reminder: Nominations are due for the June LibraryReads list in just a couple of days, by midnight, April 20th.

The just-released May LibraryReads list is remarkably homogenous. All the authors are white women, most of them have already published several books, and the majority of the titles are in the rapidly growing, some would say over-published, category of psychological suspense.

While readers advisors can happily read and recommend any of the titles, as Becky Spratford has often noted in her blog RA for All, they won’t expand readers’ horizons. She pointedly asks, “Why aren’t we all going out of way to look for titles that don’t get recognition?”

To help you do that, we’ve added “Debut” and “Diversity” columns to our spreadsheet of the nearly 200 titles mentioned during last week’s GalleyChat, GalleyChat Titles, April.

Below are comments on the June titles by non-white and LGBT authors. If you haven’t read them already, you probably won’t have time to do so before the deadline, but this may serve to remind you of titles beyond the familiar. As Becky says, “If every single one of [you] laid off of voting for the more mainstream titles and instead voted for a more diverse title, many of those mainstream titles would still get in, but maybe a few more marginalized voices would too.”

Native American

Trail of Lightning, Rebecca Roanhorse, S&S/Saga Press, June 26, 2018, DRC available

DEBUT
GalleyChatter: “Really fun, unique urban fantasy/postapoc blend with Indigenous characters & mythology!”  —– ” a post-apocalyptic urban fantasy with a Navajo cast of characters.”

Author background:
“Rebecca Roanhorse is an Ohkay Owingeh/Black writer of Indigenous futurisms. She lives in Northern New Mexico with her husband, daughter, and pug. Her debut novel Trail of Lightning (Book One of the Sixth World series) is available summer 2018 from Saga Press, and her children’s book Race to the Sun is coming in 2019 from Rick Riordan Presents. Her short story ‘Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience‘  is on the 2017 Nebula Recommended Reading List.

Her nonfiction can be found in Invisible 3: Essays and Poems on Representation in SF/F, Strange Horizons, and the upcoming How I Resist: Activism and Hope for a New Generation (Macmillan, 5/15/18).”

There There: A novel, Tommy Orange, PRH/Knopf, June 5, 2018, DRC available

DEBUT
GalleyChatter: “a story of urban indigenous peoples. Got a big push at #pla2018” — Following up on that, PRH Library tweeted that it is a department favorite.

The New Yorker recently published a story that comes from the book, and an interview, in which the author explaind that  he wrote There, There because, “I knew I wanted to write a multigenerational, multivoiced novel about Native people living in Oakland. My wanting to write it largely had to do with there not already being a novel about Native people who live in cities, and very few novels set in Oakland. Native people suffer from poor representation as it is, but having little representation in literature, as well as no (literary) version of our (urban Native) experience, was what made me want to write into that space, that void, and try to honor and express fully all that it entails to be Native and be from Oakland.”

Vietnamese-American/Autism

The Kiss QuotientHelen Hoang, PRH/Berkley pbk original, June 5, 2018, DRC not listed

DEBUT
Bustle headlines a story about the book, “The Kiss Quotient Is A Refreshing Own Voices Romance With A Heroine On The Autism Spectrum”

From the publisher:

“Key Selling Points
DEBUT AUTHOR who was discovered during Pitch Wars, an online contest with wide social media reach, where published authors match up with a mentee and work on pitch to catch an agent or editor’s eye; Helen was mentored by Brighton Walsh, a contemporary romance author published by Berkley and St. Martin’s Press

THE HEROINE HAS ASPERGER’S, as does the author, who is willing to discuss her personal experience

MULTICULTURAL CONTEMPORARY ROMANCE: hero is half Vietnamese and the author, who is also part Vietnamese, seamlessly introduces cultural elements

AN OWN VOICES NOVEL: romance readers are clamoring for better representation in romances and this book speaks to the #OwnVoices social media movement”

LGBT

History of Violence: A Novel, Édouard Louis, Translated by Lorin Stein, Macmillan/FSG, June 19, 2018, DRC available

Gallleychatter: “…by the author of End of Eddy. Has a unique voice.”

New Yorker profile of the author,  “Growing Up Poor and Queer in a French Village

From the publisher: “On Christmas Eve 2012, in Paris, the novelist Édouard Louis was raped and almost murdered by a man he had just met. This act of violence left Louis shattered; its aftermath made him a stranger to himself and sent him back to the village, the family, and the past he had sworn to leave behind.”

When Katie Met Cassidy, Camille Perri, PRH/Putnam, June 19, 2018, DRC available by request

Galleychatters were enthusiasitc about the author’s
debut, The Assistants.

Former librarian and library page Perri speaks to librarians at a PRH Open Book session (be sure
to check out her demo of the “Page Freeze” beginning at time stamp 3:24)

Confessions of the Fox: A Novel, Jordy Rosenberg, PRH/ One World, June 26, 2018, DRC available

DEBUT

Author background:

“Jordy Rosenberg is a transgender writer and scholar. He is an associate professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he teaches eighteenth-century literature and queer/trans theory. He has received fellowships and awards from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation, the Ahmanson Foundation/J. Paul Getty Trust, the UCLA Center for 17th- and 18th-Century Studies, the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University, and the Clarion Foundation’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers’ Workshop. He is the author of a scholarly monograph, Critical Enthusiasm: Capital Accumulation and the Transformation of Religious Passion. He lives in New York City and Northampton, Massachusetts. Confessions of the Fox is his first novel.”

African-American

Ayiti, Roxane Gay, Grove/Atlantic, June 12, 2018, DRC available by request

Originally published in 2011 by the Artistically Declined Press, this new edition from Grove Press, according to the publisher, “includes several new stories,” which may qualify it for the LibraryReads list.

 

Chinese-American

The Lost Vintage: A Novel, Ann Mah, HarperCollins/Morrow, June 19, 2018, DRC available

GalleyChatter comment, “Loved the LOST VINTAGE by Ann Mah- historical fiction with a mystery about a family member no one knew about, WWII & it’s set in a vineyard.”

The author is Chinese American, and a  Francophile. Her memoir, Mastering the Art of French Eating was an Amazon best book of 2013, and winner of the Elle readers prize. She also is publishing Instantly French!: Classic French Recipes for Your Electric Pressure Cooker  in September.

South Asian – American

Half Gods: Stories, Akil Kumarasamy, Macmillan/FSG, June 5, 2018, DRC available

DEBUT

One of the stories in this collection, “New World,” was published last year in Harper’s magazine.

GalleyChat: Spring Lies in Wait

Monday, January 22nd, 2018

   

“Girl” was once the hot word used in book titles to designate a certain type of psychological suspense, but this Spring will be full of “lies.” Sometimes I Lie, Let Me Lie, and All The Beautiful Lies, were among the 185 titles mentioned by librarians during January’s GalleyChat.

Below is a Storify transcript of the chat. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

For a list of the titles discussed, with information on which are available to download as e-galleys, check our Edelweiss catalog.

Join us for our next chat, Tues., Feb. 6th, 4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Details here.

Burning Up

Friday, January 19th, 2018

UPDATE: Thorndike reports that the large print pub. date has been moved up to January 30.

The week’s best seller numbers confirm just how well Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury is doing. Last week, it hit #1, quite a feat, considering it was released on a Friday, and thus lists reflected just two days of sales.

Again at #1 this week, BookScan figures, as reported by PW, show that it’s sold 220,000 copies through Jan 14. Compare that to the #1 fiction title, The Woman in the Window. BookScan reports it has sold over 36,000 copies, a respectable number, especially for a debut.

BookScan figures do not reflect the entire market, notably sales to libraries (see an analysis here, by the Independent Book Publishers Association), currently awaiting large orders to offset heavy holds queues.

Meanwhile, you may want to steer customers to the audio version, which has fewer holds. The Washington Post gives it a pointed recommendation, “Can’t find a print copy of ‘Fire and Fury?’ The audiobook delivers 12 hours of high-octane gossip.”

For your large print readers, Thorndike recently made this announcement:

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House
Michael Wolff, Thorndike
ISBN-10: 1432852043
ISBN-13: 9781432852047
Hardcover, $33.99

Meet A.J. Finn, the Author of
THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

 

For several months, GalleyChatters have been talking about A.J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018), predicting it will be the hot debut of 2018.

Below, we chat with the author.

       

GalleyChatters Predict:
Fall/Winter Reading Trends

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

The trend for psychological thrillers has had amazing longevity. With so many new titles published in the genre, fans are becoming more and more demanding.

Two titles were mentioned most often during last week’s GalleyChat as the best of the upcoming crop:

 

The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018) — please join us for a chat with the author, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 4 to 5 pm. ET, Chat window will be posted at 3 pm on EarlyWord.com

Sometimes I Lie, Alice Feeney, (Macmillan/Flatiron, March 13, 2018) — this one is SO twisty, that it lost several readers. The title itself warns readers that this is they’re dealing with the ultimate in unreliable narrators.

Nods also went to:

   

The Last Mrs. Parrish, Liv Constantine, (Harper, October 17)

Poison, Galt Niederhoffer, (Macmillan/ St. Martin’s, November 21)

The Wife Between Us, Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, January 9, 2018)

If you’re not a fan of the genre, or just need a palate cleanser, there’s much to tempt you from the nearly 130 titles getting enthusiastic endorsements (see the Edelweiss catalog here).

For those hoping to sniff out the next trend, Marika Zemke of Commerce Twp. (MI) Public Library makes a strong case for medical narratives and survival stories, saying people crave them these days. With hurricanes and fires raging and a chaotic federal government, that seems to make sense. She offers  the following as examples:

     

The Encore: A Memoir in Three Acts, Charity Tillemann-Dick, (S&S/Atria, October 3) — an opera singer continues her career despite having BOTH lungs transplanted.

Counting Backwards: A Doctor’s Notes on Anesthesia, Henry Jay Przybylo, (Norton, November 14), — “takes you past the forbidden operating room doors into the O.R.”

In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Awdish, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, October 24)  — A doctor learns first hand the flaws in current medical practice when she nearly dies herself.

The Cookie Cure: A Mother/Daughter Memoir of Cookies and Cancer, Susan Stachler, Laura Stachler, (Sourcebooks, February 1, 2018)   — “an almost unbelievable story of medical coincidence.”

Some of you may remember an earlier time when medical narratives were all the rage. GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower says they’ve never gone out of style for her. She remembers, “Back in the late 70s I read Elder’s And I Alone Survived, which fueled my obsession with survival stories. My medical obsession started in the early 1970s with James Kerr’s soap opera-ish novel The Clinic and, of course, Hailey’s Diagnosis. About 30 years ago Echo Heron published Intensive Care, about her stint as a nurse, along with Carol Gino’s The Nurse’s Story. Like many library patrons, I couldn’t get enough of these kinds of stories.”

Below is a transcript. If it does not load, or you prefer reading it in story form, link here.

YA/MG GalleyChat,Tues. July 18

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

Today’s YA/MG GalleyChat has ended. Below is the transcript. If the widget does not load, try this link.

Link here to the Edelweiss catalog of titles mentioned.

Join us for the next chat on Tuesday, August 15, 4 to 5 pm (3:30 for virtual cocktails. Virgin, of course).

THE WINDFALL: Getting Attention

Sunday, July 2nd, 2017

Diksha Basu’s debut novel, The Windfall (PRH/Crown; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample) is attracting notable attention.

TV rights were optioned in March, reports Deadline Hollywood and now that it is has been published, the NYT covers the author twice. Taking a break from her nonfiction duties, NYT reviewer Jennifer Senior writes the novel tells “a story that’s the stuff of Amartya Sen’s worst nightmares and Tom Wolfe’s sweetest dreams.” The paper also has a feature on the Basu’s “Sunday Routine.

As part of its “Culture Index” RollingStone says it is one of the “Seven things you should check out this week.” HuffPost lists it as one of “12 Great New Books To Bring To The Beach This Summer” while Bustle names it one of “15 Uplifting Books That Will Soothe Your Soul In Dark Times.” Elle reviews, writing “The Windfall explores the effects of generational, gender, and class differences. Through her detailed descriptions of family meals, dusty floors, and ostentatious outfits, Basu gives us a full snapshot of a community’s life in contemporary India.”

PW stars, calling it a “charming, funny debut.” It is a July Indie Next pick.

NPR interviews the author on Weekend Edition Sunday, calling her novel “a delightful comedy of errors where [the characters] navigate the unexpected pressures and pleasures of newfound wealth in modern India.”

Titles to Know and Recommend, Week of July 3, 2017

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Even the Fourth of July holiday won’t prevent books from shipping next week. Julie Garwood’s Wired (see below, under “Peer Picks”) is one of several titles with a July 4 publication date.

The titles covered in this column, and several other notable titles arriving next week, are listed with ordering information and alternate formats on our downloadable spreadsheet, EarlyWord New Title Radar Week of July 3, 2017.

Media Magnets

Woolly, Ben Mezrich (S&S/Atria; S&S Audio).

Author Mezrich has covered several wild topics, but none quite as woolly as this, to be featured this week on CBS Sunday Morning. Picked by USA Today as one of “10 Hot Books You Won’t Want To Miss This Summer,” it is described as a “Real-life thriller [that] goes inside the Harvard lab of geneticist George Church as he and his team attempt to ‘resurrect’ the extinct Woolly Mammoth.” Mezrich’s The Accidental Billionaires was the basis for the successful movie The Social Network. Fox has the film rights to this one.

Media Picks

Persons Unknown, Susie Steiner (PRH/Random House; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample).

People magazine’s “Book of the Week” in the new issue, noting, “Steiner (Missing, Presumed) populates this hot-button narrative with achingly human characters, but no one compares to the [pregnant] hormonal, mordantly funny mom-cop who will stop at nothing to save her son.”

Peer Picks

One LibraryReads pick comes out this week:

Wired, Julie Garwood (PRH/Berkley; OverDrive Sample).

“When Agent Liam Scott recruits a beautiful hacker, Allison Trent, to find a leak within the FBI, he uses her cousin’s criminal record as leverage. As they try to deny their growing attraction, the computer program Allison developed is stolen. Liam helps track down the thief while protecting her from continual harassment and attempts on her life. I genuinely enjoyed reading this novel. The whole book was tightly plotted and well written. This is a story I would highly recommend to romance readers, especially those new to the genre.” — Maria Gruener, Watertown Regional Library, Watertown, SD

Four Indie Next selections hit shelves as well:

Made for Love, Alissa Nutting (HC/Ecco; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample).

“I don’t think I’ve gotten this much sheer pleasure from a book in a long while. Made for Love is freaking off-the-wall bonkers in the best way. We follow Hazel, a woman on the edge who recently escaped from her top-of-the-tech-world psycho of a husband (whom, she fears, desires to place a chip in her brain so that they may ‘meld’ consciousnesses), as she battles through hyper-surveillance for a life off the grid. Along the way, she meets a truly delightful cast of characters, gets into some absurd hijinks, and works through the piles of garbage the world has tossed her way. Ditch the jet skis — this is all the summer fun you’re going to need.” —Molly Moore, BookPeople, Austin, TX

Additional Buzz: It is on a number of summer reading lists including those complied by Real Simple, Literary Hub, Cosmopolitan, New York magazine, HuffPost, Nylon, and Refinery29. BuzzFeed features it on this year’s “Most Exciting Books Coming In 2017” and their “Exciting New Books You Need To Read This Summer” lists. The Rumpus reviews, calling it “hilarious, madcap.”

The Reason You’re Alive, Matthew Quick (HC/Harper; HarperLuxe; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample).

“David Granger is a 68-year-old, conservative war veteran with a bleeding-heart liberal son, a granddaughter who needs him, and a whole lot of emotional baggage from his time in Vietnam. He is patriotic and brash, and he has no problem expressing his opinion. In our current politically divided culture, where people with different views struggle to understand each other, this story has incredible value. I wanted to dislike this protagonist, whose views are so different from my own, but I couldn’t. He was kind and caring and his story pulled at my heart.” —Melanie Locke, Old Firehouse Books, Fort Collins, CO

Additional Buzz: A movie is in the works according to The Hollywood Reporter; Miramax bought film rights almost a year ago.

The Graybar Hotel: Stories, Curtis Dawkins (S&S/Scribner; S&S Audio).

“Discard the thought that Curtis Dawkins is serving a life sentence and insert the thought that this is an amazing short-story collection by a debut author. In The Graybar Hotel, we glimpse the emotional lives of the inmates of a Kalamazoo prison, who are cut off from the world and in a place where time moves and sounds different than before. One character calls random numbers just so he can hear a voice or any noise for his allotted 15 minutes, anything to connect to the outside world again. The Graybar Hotel reminded me of reading early Denis Johnson, in the way that the writing is so sparse I fell right into the stories and suffered along with the inmates. A captivating read that allowed me a glimpse of the humanity of prison life.” —Jason Kennedy, Boswell Book Company, Milwaukee, WI

South Pole Station, Ashley Shelby (Macmillan/Picador; OverDrive Sample).

“Prepare yourself for a frozen and fun adventure in the Antarctic. Cooper Gosling apparently does not have enough cold weather or oddball people in her Minneapolis life, so she heads to the South Pole Station to try to reclaim her career as a painter. Ashley Shelby has collected a wonderful cast of quirky characters in this southernmost ice box and readers are in for a treat when they meet this bunch of scientists, artists, medics, and misfits. Bundle up and enjoy the ride!” —Pamela Klinger-Horn, Excelsior Bay Books, Excelsior, MN

Tie-ins

Midnight, Texas, a mid-summer debut TV series premiering on NBC July 25, gets its tie-in this week, Midnight Crossroad (TV Tie-In) by Charlaine Harris (PRH/Ace; OverDrive Sample).

It is the first book in Harris’s Midnight, Texas series, followed by Day Shift (PRH/Ace, 2015; Recorded Books; OverDrive Sample) and Night Shift (PRH/Ace, 2016; Recorded Books; OverDrive Sample).

Bustle calls the world of the books “Twin Peaks with vampires.” See our earlier post for full cast details and a plot summary.

For our full list of upcoming adaptations, download our Books to Movies and TV and link to our listing of tie-ins.

Pearl Power, Summer Reads

Friday, June 30th, 2017

“Librarian’s librarian” Nancy Pearl gives a boost to several titles on NPR’s Morning Edition this week, picking her favorite books from the spring list for summer reading.

Host Steve Inskeep begins by asking if the prolific reader is have any trouble focusing on books “in these news saturated times.” Pearl admits that she she finds her reading tastes are changing and she has abandoned her usual favorites, character-driven stories for page-turners

Her favorite is the debut, August Snow, (Soho Crime; Recorded Books). She says, “I’m not just saying that because I’m from Detroit and it’s set in Detroit.”

Prepub reviews dunned the book for veering into thriller cliches, but Kirkus noted, “it’s easy to overlook those flaws considering what this book gets right: a hugely likable hero who uses his wealth to bring his neighborhood back to life; a feel for the vitality and pride in run-down urban neighborhoods as good as George Pelecanos on Washington, D.C.; appealing supporting characters who give life to the book’s theme of the solace to be found in communities. It adds up to a very pleasurable read.”

By the end of the program, Inskeep observes, “we started out trying to get away from the news, but we’re actually getting fresh perspectives on the news of recent years … from urban struggle to rural areas that are losing population and economic vitality.”

Click here for the full list of titles and annotations.

Readers Are With THE FORCE

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Don Winslow debuts on the NYT Hardcover Fiction list at #10 with The Force (HarperCollins/Morrow; Blackstone Audio; OverDrive Audio Sample), the highest any of his three novels have ever reached.

The book gets its lift from a great deal of press, including a review in the NYT by Janet Maslin who calls it a “shattering New York cop epic about an elite task force leader who’s a hero until he’s not.” It is also featured in the NYTBR Crime column, with long time reviewer Marilyn Stasio calling it “a scorcher.” In a third round of NYT attention, Winslow is the subject of the “By the Book” column this week. The Washington Post says it is “a big, fat book of fast-moving fiction … riveting and scary.” Adding to the buzz, film rights sold before the book even had a title. UPDATE: The movie release has just been set for March 1, 2019. David Mamet has been hired to write the script and James Mangold (Logan) to direct.

Winslow has also made news this week with an ad in the NYT that is an open letter blasting “President Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions for wanting to ‘drag us back into one of the most catastrophic social policies in this nation’s history: #TheWaronDrugs'” writes USA Today. He tells USA Today that he placed the ad at his own expense because “I feel so strongly that this (drug) policy is wrong. … (It) seeks to expand a disastrous policy that has ripped our nation apart.”

Holds across libraries we checked are reflecting the attention; many systems have ratios topping 5:1.

Pennie Picks KISS CARLO

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Costco’s influential book buyer Pennie Clark Ianniciello, selects as her July “Buyers Pick” Kiss Carlo by Adriana Trigiani (HarperCollins/Harper; HarperLuxe; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample), a love story and family tale set in the world of the theater.

Ianniciello gives it her personal endorsement, writing “I look forward to every new book by Adriana Trigiani … her books are a joy to read.”

In an interview in the Costco Connection, Trigiani says “The plot sets the stage for a Shakespearean conflict, for it’s a story of love, loyalty and creativity that is filled with everything we all struggle with as humans.”

It lands on the NYT Hardcover Fiction list #7, her highest-ranking debut to date.

Trigiani is featured on Today in a segment headlined “Need a juicy summer read?” Chatting with Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb over a breakfast of pasta and red wine, she claims this book is her “favorite of everything I’ve written.”

High Tide for BEACH HOUSE FOR RENT

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Mary Alice Monroe hits a career high with Beach House for Rent (S&S/Gallery Books; S&S Audio; OverDrive Sample), debuting on the NYT Hardcover Fiction list at #12 [UPDATE: The “eco-minded” author is featured in the NYT‘s “Inside the List” column].

Beach House for Rent is book four in the Isle of Palms series begun in 2002. Each of the four books are spaced roughly five years apart: The Beach House (2002), Swimming Lessons (2007), Beach House Memories (2012), Beach House for Rent (2017). In their starred review LJ writes this newest can stand alone.

The series has been on the path to an adaptation for the Hallmark channel, announced in 2015.  Star Andie McDowell confirmed that via a video, but there has been no news since on the status. The rerelease of the first book in the series last December may indicate there is movement.

Reading for the Fourth, on TODAY

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

The Today Show rounded up their regular group of book recommenders, BuzzFeed Books Editor Issac Fitzgerald , author and recent book store owner, Emma Straub and thriller writer Brad Thor, to suggest books to read over the holiday.

Click here for the full list of picks.

Green’s TURTLES

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

As promised, John Green devoted yesterday’s vlogbrothers video to his forthcoming book, Turtles All the Way Down (PRH/Dutton YR; Oct 10; cover art to come), his first novel since 2012’s The Fault in Our Stars.

He doesn’t reveal anything about the book’s content, talking instead about the special ISBN for signed copies, causing pre-orders for that edition to spike. Along the way, he explains what ISBN’s are, knowledge he gained while working at Booklist.

Westward Ho With a Fresh Air Bump

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

The Best Land Under Heaven: The Donner Party in the Age of Manifest Destiny by Michael Wallis (Norton/Liveright; OverDrive Sample) is moving up the Amazon charts, currently at #62 from #9,956, thanks to a feature on NPR’s Fresh Air.

The struggling Donner Party is known for restoring to cannibalism to survive, but Wallis says “there’s so much more. That’s why I wanted to tell the back story.”

Wallis details the hardships of the journey and how they broke the members of the party down, both physically and psychologically. Sadly, many of their problems came from their own errors, such as packing too much, taking the wrong route, misjudging the weather, and assuming too much while knowing too little.

On what can be learned from their story, Wallis says “I think it tells us not only about the American West but really about the whole nation … Those of us who do not learn our history are doomed to repeat it … The words that ring out to me continually are two words that combined can be very fatal, then as now, and those words are: ignorance and arrogance.”

True West reviews the book in an illustrated account, writing it “will be considered for many years the primary volume for students and scholars seeking a detailed and well-annotated history of the tragic tale of emigration on the Overland Trail to California.”

PW stars it, writing Wallis “reclaims the horrific story of the infamously ill-fated wagon train from the annals of sensationalism.”