Archive for the ‘GalleyChat’ Category

YA/MG GalleyChat, TODAY, Tues., Jan. 21st, #ewgcya

Tuesday, January 21st, 2020


Today’s YA/MG GalleyChat, Tuesday, Jan, 21st, 2:30-3:30, ET, welcomes new host, Hailie Fields. A regular member of both adult and YA/MG GalleyChats as @bookloaner, Hallie is an avid galley reader and audiobook fan. She is a Teen Services Librarian in the Bay Area where she specializes in programming, collection development, and teen volunteer programs.

Thanks to our previous host Elise Martinez for encouraging and spreading the #ewgcya enthusiasm.

See you all soon.

GalleyChat Roundup, Jan. 2020

Friday, January 17th, 2020

As you prepare for the long weekend ahead (or for Midwinter at the end of next week), consider downloading some of the galleys that were discussed during last week’s GalleyChat:

EarlyWord GalleyChat, JAN, 2020 — downloadable spreadsheet, useful for creating ordering carts, includes comments from GalleyChatters, information on which titles are available as DRCs through Edelweiss and/or NetGalley, and LibraryReads deadlines.

—  Edelweiss Catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Many of the authors discussed will appear at MidWinter, including Elizabeth Wetmore, author of a debut that has been hot with GalleyChatters, Valentine.  These events are free, but tickets are required, so be sure to sign up here.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tues., Feb. 4th , 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). More details and a schedule of upcoming chats here.

Set your calendar alarms and bring a friend.

YA/MG GalleyChat, RESCHEDULED for Tues., Jan 21

Friday, January 17th, 2020


Please note: the new date for the next #ewgcya is this coming TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2:30-3:30, ET.

More details and a schedule for the upcoming year here.

Set your alarms and bring a friend!

GalleyChat Roundup, Dec. 2019

Monday, December 23rd, 2019

GalleyChatters gazed into their crystal balls to forecast which titles will be hot this coming spring and summer during this month’s chat.

Summaries of the chat, below, for collection development, readers advisory, and LibraryReads consideration:

EarlyWord GalleyChat, DEC, 2019 — downloadable spreadsheet, useful for creating ordering carts, includes comments from GalleyChatters, information on which titles are available as DRCs through Edelweiss and/or NetGalley, and LibraryReads deadlines.

Edelweiss Catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tues., Jan. 7th, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). More details and a schedule of upcoming chats here.

Set your calendar alarms and bring a friend.

Heating up for March (LibraryReads Nominations Due Feb. 1)

Russell, Kate Elizabeth, My Dark Vanessa, (HarperCollins/Morrow, 3/10), DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGalley

Still hot after months of discussion (see the chat roundups from November and October), this title was originally announced as a January release. The move to March has further whetted GalleyChatters’ anticipation, as they look forward to discussing it with readers. Cari Dubiel notes, “this was a tough one to get through, but so intense and absorbing. A story of destructive love, obsession, and power plays between a woman and the much older teacher she falls for in high school.”

Jemisin, N. K. The City We Became, (Hachette/Orbit, 3/24), DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGalley

The DRC for this heavily-anticipted title became available just before the chat, causing GalleyChatters to immdediately place it on top of teetering TBR piles. The first in a new sereis by the author who made history by winning three consecutive Best Novel Hugo Awards, it’s been starred by all four prepub reviewers.

Wrobel, Stephanie, Darling Rose Gold,  (PRH/Penguin Berkley, 3/17); DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGalley

With echoes of the sad story of Munchausen by Proxy victim, Gypsy Rose Blanchard, portrayed in the series The Act on Hulu and the HBO documentary “Mommy Dead and Dearest,” GalleyChatters foumd this novel creepy but riveting. Vicki Nesting, notes that it’s “One of two books coming out this spring that seem to be ‘inspired’ by the true story of Gypsy Rose and Dee Dee Blanchard. The other is Grace Is Gone. by Emily Elgar, (HarperCollins/Harper Paperback original, 1/20/20).

Serle, Rebecca, In Five Years, (S&S/Atria, 3/3/20); DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGalley

The publisher calls this  “perfect for fans of ME BEFORE YOU and ONE DAY” and several GalleyChatters agree. Andrienne Cruz describes the story, “[main character] Dannie has everything – a promising career and her boyfriend is about to propose, so it was kind of discomfitting to find herself transported 5 years down the road with another man. Is it a dream or an epiphany?”  Tracy Babiasz says she “very much enjoyed this. It’s like just a bit of magical realism so naturally integrated that you forget some things she writes about aren’t possible.”

Swanson, Peter, Eight Perfect Murders (HarperCollins/ Morrow, 3/3/2020); DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGalley

Cari Dubiel attests that GalleyChat favorite, “Peter Swanson never disappoints me, and I loved EIGHT PERFECT MURDERS. A love letter to the crime fiction genre, a tribute to all those writers who paved the way for us, plus the requisite chills and characters with questionable morals.” It’s compared to books by another GalleyChat favorite, author Anthony Horowitz, who chimed in, “I’m reading it and enjoying it right now.”

YA/MG GalleyChat, Nov. 21

Thursday, November 21st, 2019


The November YA/MG GalleyChat has now ended.

Join us for the next one, on Monday, Jan. 20th, from 2:30-3:30, ET. #ewgcya

More details and a schedule for the upcoming year here.

Set your alarms and bring a friend!

GalleyChat Roundup, Nov. 2019

Thursday, November 14th, 2019

More than 200 upcoming titles were discussed during last week’s GalleyChat,

Summaries of the chat, below, for collection development, readers advisory, and LibraryReads consideration:

EarlyWord GalleyChat, Nov, 2019 — downloadable spreadsheet, useful for creating ordering carts, includes comments from GalleyChatters, information on which titles are available as DRCs through Edelweiss and/or NetGalley, and LibraryReads deadlines.

Edelweiss Catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tues., Dec. 3rd, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). More details and a schedule of upcoming chats here.

Set your calendar alarms and bring a friend.

HOT Title Pub Date changed from Jan to March

Russell, Kate Elizabeth, My Dark Vanessa, (HarperCollins/Morrow, 3/10), LibraryReads nominations due 12/1/19; DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGalley

Those looking forward to the public’s response to this thought-provoking debut, will have to wait a couple more months. HarperCollins Library Marketing noted that the pub. date has been moved from January to March.

The book, which now has nearly 100 “Much Loves” on Edelweiss, has been heavily discussed on GalleyChat since June.

The comments from this month’s chat capture readers’ responses:

Janet Lockhart, “An unflinching portrayal of a young girl navigating the aftermath of a devastating relationship. Brilliant and unforgettable.”

Robin B, “Intense, disturbing, and compelling. I smell a blockbuster”

RedheadFangirl, “had to read this after the buzz! – really compelling #metoo story but unexpected how she believes this was a love story & not the victim.”

Virginia Stanley, HarperCollins Library Marketing, “I know how you feel! It calls everything into question for the main character. She has to believe it was love. This book just wrung it out of me.”

Susan Balla, “Not sure how I feel about MY DARK VANESSA. Everyone disturbed me. I gave it 5 stars because it is a great book, but I felt like a traitor to my sex at times.”

And Kaite Stover summed up what is evident from the GalleyChat discussion, “Get your bookclubs ready to talk, (alot!} about MY DARK VANESSA @GinnyMcCoo.”

Heating up for February (LibraryReads Nominations Due Jan. 1)

[See the October GalleyChat Roundup for titles releasing in January. There’s still time tonominate them.]

Sosa, Mia, The Worst Best Man, (HarperCollins/Avon Trade pbk, 2/4), LibraryReads nominations due 1/1/19; DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGall

Sosa has published several romances, featuring strong Afro-Latinx women. This one marks the author’s move up from mass market to trade pbk.  GalleyChatters say they “love her hilarious romances,’ and “enemies-to-lovers” story  line.

Montimore, Margarita, Oona Out Of Order, (Macmillan/Flatiron; 2/25). LibraryReads nominations due 1/1/20; DRC available from NetGalley

Technically a debut (her earlier novel was self-published), this title has an intriguing premise. One New Years Eve, a 19-year-old woman finds herself turning 51 at the stroke of midnight. Every New Years thereafter, she skips to yet another age. GalleyChatters call it, “a quantum leap type story, but Oona hops from young woman in 1982 through her own life, showing up at different ages and having to put life pieces together. Full of love of music and thoughts on aging.”

Fowler, Therese Anne, A Good Neighborhood, (Macmillan/St. Martins, 2/4), LibraryReads nominations due 1/1/20; DRC available from NetGalley

GalleyChatters say “everyone is talking about” this story of “how a tree can tear apart an established neighborhood full of caring residents” and that it” will make you rethink what’s important.”

YA/MG GalleyChat, #ewgcya

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2019

The October YA/MG GalleyChat has ended. A full list of titles mentioned here. To read the comments, search Twitter by #ewgcya.

The next chat will be Thurs., Nov. 21st,, 2:30 to 3:30 ET.

Set your alarms and bring a friend!

GalleyChat Roundup, Oct. 2019

Wednesday, October 9th, 2019

Spring 2020 titles dominated last week’s GalleyChat, with a few peeks at summer titles and one coming this fall, Susanna Clarke’s Piranesi. Her first novel since her successful debut 16 years ago, Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell, it is scheduled for September (not yet listed on wholesaler sites).

Summaries of the chat, below, for collection development, readers advisory, and LibraryReads consideration:

EarlyWord GalleyChat, October, 2019 — downloadable spreadsheet, useful for creating ordering carts, includes comments from GalleyChatters, information on which titles are available as DRCs through Edelweiss and/or NetGalley, and LibraryReads deadlines.

Edelweiss Catalog — includes covers, publisher marketing information, links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tues., Nov. 5th, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). More details and a schedule of upcoming chats here.

Set your calendar alarms and bring a friend.

Presentations Influencing GalleyChatters

Several mentioned the following:

HarperCollins FaceBook Live — available to view now. Another live buzz session is scheduled for Friday, Oct 11.

Booklist Webinar, Brilliant Book Club Picks — now available in an archived version.

LibraryReads Reminder, December List

GalleyChatters continued the buzz for the BEA Buzz Title, Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid, (PRH/Penguin). See our annotation in last month’s roundup.

If you plan to vote for it for LibraryReads, be sure to do so by Nov. 1. The pub date has been moved from Jan. 7th to Dec. 31st, changing its eligibility to the December list.

Also, when voting for LibraryReads, please consider our list of upcoming Diversity Titles.

Hot January Titles (LibraryReads nominations due 12/1/19)

Russell, Kate Elizabeth, My Dark Vanessa, (HarperCollins/Morrow, 1/28, LibraryReads nominations due 12/1/19; DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGalley)

Described as the “mesmerizing” story of 15-year-old Vanessa’s relationship with her manipulative 42-year-old teacher. As an adult, she is asked to support accusations that her former teacher is an abuser, forcing her to look again at the relationship that she always characterized as a love story. GalleyChatters say it’s kept them thinking for months and they are looking forward to public reaction. It’s been starred by Kirkus, Publishers Weekly and Library Journal, (Booklist has not reviewed it to date).

Napolitano, Ann, Dear Edward, (PRH/Dial, 1/14, LibraryReads nominations due 12/1/19; DRC available from Edelweiss and NetGalley)

When Dial editor Julie Barer signed up this book, she told PW that its “story of the passengers aboard an airplane hurtling toward a tragic crash, and the coming-of-age of the flight’s sole survivor, 12-year-old Edward Adler” would be “the next literary fiction blockbuster.” GalleyChatter Jennifer Dayton began championing it back in June and many others are now on board, calling it, “gorgeously written, emotionally searing.”

Cummins, Jeanine, American Dirt, (Macmillan/Flatiron, 1/21, LibraryReads nominations due 12/1/19; DRC available from NetGalley)

One of the titles that received early buzz at Book Expo, we highlighted it last month with the following annotation:

Called “thrilling, timely, and heartbreaking” expected to be “one of the biggest titles of 2020. It starts with a gunshot and doesn’t let you go” and “an important, compassionate, amazing story of one woman’s struggle to get from Mexico to the US.” Take a look at the opinion piece Cummins published in the NYT last year. Entertainment Weekly previewed it in May as “One of 2020’s most anticipated titles, Jeanine Cummins’ sweeping novel is set to arrive with big expectations: It’s already generated raves from the likes of Don Winslow (‘a GRAPES OF WRATH for our times’) and Stephen King (‘an extraordinary piece of work’). And back in 2018, it sparked a nine-house, seven-figure auction, ultimately won by Flatiron Books. This level of hype, in other words, is pretty rare.” Further proof, a movie is in the works.

Sept. GalleyChat Roundup — #ewgc

Tuesday, September 17th, 2019

Librarians set a GalleyChat record last week, discussing over 250 upcoming titles in the hour-long chat..

Summaries, below, for collection development, readers advisory, and LibraryReads consideration:

EarlyWord GalleyChat, September, 2019 —   downloadable spreadsheet, useful for creating ordering carts, includes comments from GalleyChatters, information on which titles are available as DRCs through Edelweiss and/or NetGalley, and LibraryReads deadlines.

Edelweiss Catalog — shows covers, publisher marketing information, links to Edelweiss DRCs.

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tues., Oct. 1, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). More details and a schedule for the upcoming year here.

Set your calendar alarms and bring a friend.

A few trends emerged last week:

— Several GalleyChatters brought up titles that got their attention during the Booklist Webinar—Romantic Reads (click link for archived version).

— Christmas comes in Sept/Oct this year, with holiday-themed titles. Below are just a few of the covers (find all of them by searching the spreadsheet under “Christmas.”)

— Ingram’s Collection Development librarians, who have a broad view of what’s about to be published, noted that several books on Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are on the horizon:

— Among the many diversity titles, the following are receiving particularly strong attention. For more diversity titles, check our ongoing list of Diversity Titles for LibraryReads Consideration 

Cummins, Jeanine, American Dirt, (Macmillan/Flatiron; LibraryReads nominations due 12/1/19; DRC available from NetGalley)

Called “thrilling, timely, and heartbreaking” expected to be “one of the biggest titles of 2020. It starts with a gunshot and doesn’t let you go”  and “an important, compassionate, amazing story of one woman’s struggle to get from Mexico to the US.” Take a look at the opinion piece Cummins published in the NYT last year. Entertainment Weekly previewed it in May as “One of 2020’s most anticipated titles, Jeanine Cummins’ sweeping novel is set to arrive with big expectations: It’s already generated raves from the likes of Don Winslow (‘a GRAPES OF WRATH for our times’) and Stephen King (‘an extraordinary piece of work’). And back in 2018, it sparked a nine-house, seven-figure auction, ultimately won by Flatiron Books. This level of hype, in other words, is pretty rare.”  Further proof, a movie is in the works,

Reid, Kiley, Such A Fun Age (PRH/Penguin, 12/31/19; LibraryReads nominations due 11/1/19; DRC available from Edelweiss & NetGalley)

Called “A fascinating debut about privilege, class and race and how uncomfortable & sticky it can be to try and ‘do the right thing,'” about “a young black babysitter (who) gets caught up in a moment when she’s stopped by a security guard at a grocery store while taking care of her white charge. Electrifying and layered, timely and discussible. Great for book clubs.” It was a BEA 2019 Buzz Title

Tsao, Tiffany, The Majesties(S&S/Atria, 1/21/20; LibraryReads nominations due 12/1/19; DRC available from Edelweiss & NetGalley)

Described as  “like CRAZY RICH ASIANS but sinister.”

Towards More Diverse
LibraryReads Lists

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Reminder: Nominations are due for the June LibraryReads list in just a couple of days, by midnight, April 20th.

The just-released May LibraryReads list is remarkably homogenous. All the authors are white women, most of them have already published several books, and the majority of the titles are in the rapidly growing, some would say over-published, category of psychological suspense.

While readers advisors can happily read and recommend any of the titles, as Becky Spratford has often noted in her blog RA for All, they won’t expand readers’ horizons. She pointedly asks, “Why aren’t we all going out of way to look for titles that don’t get recognition?”

To help you do that, we’ve added “Debut” and “Diversity” columns to our spreadsheet of the nearly 200 titles mentioned during last week’s GalleyChat, GalleyChat Titles, April.

Below are are excerpts from the tweets about the June titles by non-white and LGBT authors. If you haven’t read them already, you probably won’t have time to do so before the deadline, but this may serve to remind you of titles beyond the familiar. As Becky says, “If every single one of [you] laid off of voting for the more mainstream titles and instead voted for a more diverse title, many of those mainstream titles would still get in, but maybe a few more marginalized voices would too.”

Native American

Trail of Lightning, Rebecca Roanhorse, S&S/Saga Press, June 26, 2018, DRC available

DEBUT
GalleyChatter: “Really fun, unique urban fantasy/postapoc blend with Indigenous characters & mythology!”  —– ” a post-apocalyptic urban fantasy with a Navajo cast of characters.”

Author background:
“Rebecca Roanhorse is an Ohkay Owingeh/Black writer of Indigenous futurisms. She lives in Northern New Mexico with her husband, daughter, and pug. Her debut novel Trail of Lightning (Book One of the Sixth World series) is available summer 2018 from Saga Press, and her children’s book Race to the Sun is coming in 2019 from Rick Riordan Presents. Her short story ‘Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience‘  is on the 2017 Nebula Recommended Reading List.

Her nonfiction can be found in Invisible 3: Essays and Poems on Representation in SF/F, Strange Horizons, and the upcoming How I Resist: Activism and Hope for a New Generation (Macmillan, 5/15/18).”

There There: A novel, Tommy Orange, PRH/Knopf, June 5, 2018, DRC available

DEBUT
GalleyChatter: “a story of urban indigenous peoples. Got a big push at #pla2018” — Following up on that, PRH Library tweeted that it is a department favorite.

The New Yorker recently published a story that comes from the book, and an interview, in which the author explaind that  he wrote There, There because, “I knew I wanted to write a multigenerational, multivoiced novel about Native people living in Oakland. My wanting to write it largely had to do with there not already being a novel about Native people who live in cities, and very few novels set in Oakland. Native people suffer from poor representation as it is, but having little representation in literature, as well as no (literary) version of our (urban Native) experience, was what made me want to write into that space, that void, and try to honor and express fully all that it entails to be Native and be from Oakland.”

Vietnamese-American/Autism

The Kiss QuotientHelen Hoang, PRH/Berkley pbk original, June 5, 2018, DRC not listed

DEBUT
Bustle headlines a story about the book, “The Kiss Quotient Is A Refreshing Own Voices Romance With A Heroine On The Autism Spectrum”

From the publisher:

“Key Selling Points
DEBUT AUTHOR who was discovered during Pitch Wars, an online contest with wide social media reach, where published authors match up with a mentee and work on pitch to catch an agent or editor’s eye; Helen was mentored by Brighton Walsh, a contemporary romance author published by Berkley and St. Martin’s Press

THE HEROINE HAS ASPERGER’S, as does the author, who is willing to discuss her personal experience

MULTICULTURAL CONTEMPORARY ROMANCE: hero is half Vietnamese and the author, who is also part Vietnamese, seamlessly introduces cultural elements

AN OWN VOICES NOVEL: romance readers are clamoring for better representation in romances and this book speaks to the #OwnVoices social media movement”

LGBT

History of Violence: A Novel, Édouard Louis, Translated by Lorin Stein, Macmillan/FSG, June 19, 2018, DRC available

Gallleychatter: “…by the author of End of Eddy. Has a unique voice.”

New Yorker profile of the author,  “Growing Up Poor and Queer in a French Village

From the publisher: “On Christmas Eve 2012, in Paris, the novelist Édouard Louis was raped and almost murdered by a man he had just met. This act of violence left Louis shattered; its aftermath made him a stranger to himself and sent him back to the village, the family, and the past he had sworn to leave behind.”

When Katie Met Cassidy, Camille Perri, PRH/Putnam, June 19, 2018, DRC available by request

Galleychatters were enthusiasitc about the author’s
debut, The Assistants.

Former librarian and library page Perri speaks to librarians at a PRH Open Book session (be sure
to check out her demo of the “Page Freeze” beginning at time stamp 3:24)

Confessions of the Fox: A Novel, Jordy Rosenberg, PRH/ One World, June 26, 2018, DRC available

DEBUT

Author background:

“Jordy Rosenberg is a transgender writer and scholar. He is an associate professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he teaches eighteenth-century literature and queer/trans theory. He has received fellowships and awards from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation, the Ahmanson Foundation/J. Paul Getty Trust, the UCLA Center for 17th- and 18th-Century Studies, the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University, and the Clarion Foundation’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers’ Workshop. He is the author of a scholarly monograph, Critical Enthusiasm: Capital Accumulation and the Transformation of Religious Passion. He lives in New York City and Northampton, Massachusetts. Confessions of the Fox is his first novel.”

African-American

Ayiti, Roxane Gay, Grove/Atlantic, June 12, 2018, DRC available by request

Originally published in 2011 by the Artistically Declined Press, this new edition from Grove Press, according to the publisher, “includes several new stories,” which may qualify it for the LibraryReads list.

 

Chinese-American

The Lost Vintage: A Novel, Ann Mah, HarperCollins/Morrow, June 19, 2018, DRC available

GalleyChatter comment, “Loved the LOST VINTAGE by Ann Mah- historical fiction with a mystery about a family member no one knew about, WWII & it’s set in a vineyard.”

The author is Chinese American, and a  Francophile. Her memoir, Mastering the Art of French Eating was an Amazon best book of 2013, and winner of the Elle readers prize. She also is publishing Instantly French!: Classic French Recipes for Your Electric Pressure Cooker  in September.

South Asian – American

Half Gods: Stories, Akil Kumarasamy, Macmillan/FSG, June 5, 2018, DRC available

DEBUT

One of the stories in this collection, “New World,” was published last year in Harper’s magazine.

GalleyChat, Tues. Dec. 5

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

The December GalleyChat is a wrap. The full list of 127 titles discussed is here.

Join us for the next GalleyChat on Jan. 9, 4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails, to learn about the galleys fellow librarians are loving.

GalleyChat Looks to
Spring/Summer Hits

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

 

A glimpse of Spring/Summer 2018 season arrived via the November GalleyChat. Several titles carry over from previous chats, particularly A.J. Finn’s domestic thriller, The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, January 2, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 11/20/17). It leads the list in terms of “Much Love” designations on Edelweiss, with 132.

Attesting to the enduring appeal of the genre, another domestic thriller, Peter Swanson’s April title, All the Beautiful Lies, (HarperCollins/Morrow, April 3, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 2/20/17) already has 76 “Much Love” comments.

Among the titles receiving particular GalleyChat passion is Tara Westover’s debut memoir, Educated, (PRH/Random House, February 20, 2018; LibraryReads nomination deadline, 12/20/17). By a woman who grew up in an abusive home, it is described as the “2018 version of Glass Castle.”

For a list of all the titles discussed, check our Edelweiss catalog,

Join us for our next chat, Tues., Dec. 5,  4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Details here.

October GalleyChat:
Teetering TBR Piles

Friday, October 6th, 2017

Librarians leaped into Winter/Spring titles during Tuesday’s GalleyChat.

For a list of all the titles discussed, check our Edelweiss catalog, or download the spreadsheet, EarlyWord GalleyChat titles, 10:3:17.

Join us for our next chat, Tues., Nov 7,  4 to 5 p.m. ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails). Details here.

GalleyChatters Predict:
Fall/Winter Reading Trends

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

The trend for psychological thrillers has had amazing longevity. With so many new titles published in the genre, fans are becoming more and more demanding.

Two titles were mentioned most often during last week’s GalleyChat as the best of the upcoming crop:

 

The Woman in the Window, (HarperCollins/Morrow, Jan 2, 2018) — please join us for a chat with the author, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 4 to 5 pm. ET, Chat window will be posted at 3 pm on EarlyWord.com

Sometimes I Lie, Alice Feeney, (Macmillan/Flatiron, March 13, 2018) — this one is SO twisty, that it lost several readers. The title itself warns readers that this is they’re dealing with the ultimate in unreliable narrators.

Nods also went to:

   

The Last Mrs. Parrish, Liv Constantine, (Harper, October 17)

Poison, Galt Niederhoffer, (Macmillan/ St. Martin’s, November 21)

The Wife Between Us, Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, January 9, 2018)

If you’re not a fan of the genre, or just need a palate cleanser, there’s much to tempt you from the nearly 130 titles getting enthusiastic endorsements (see the Edelweiss catalog here).

For those hoping to sniff out the next trend, Marika Zemke of Commerce Twp. (MI) Public Library makes a strong case for medical narratives and survival stories, saying people crave them these days. With hurricanes and fires raging and a chaotic federal government, that seems to make sense. She offers  the following as examples:

     

The Encore: A Memoir in Three Acts, Charity Tillemann-Dick, (S&S/Atria, October 3) — an opera singer continues her career despite having BOTH lungs transplanted.

Counting Backwards: A Doctor’s Notes on Anesthesia, Henry Jay Przybylo, (Norton, November 14), — “takes you past the forbidden operating room doors into the O.R.”

In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope, Rana Awdish, (Macmillan/St. Martin’s, October 24)  — A doctor learns first hand the flaws in current medical practice when she nearly dies herself.

The Cookie Cure: A Mother/Daughter Memoir of Cookies and Cancer, Susan Stachler, Laura Stachler, (Sourcebooks, February 1, 2018)   — “an almost unbelievable story of medical coincidence.”

Some of you may remember an earlier time when medical narratives were all the rage. GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower says they’ve never gone out of style for her. She remembers, “Back in the late 70s I read Elder’s And I Alone Survived, which fueled my obsession with survival stories. My medical obsession started in the early 1970s with James Kerr’s soap opera-ish novel The Clinic and, of course, Hailey’s Diagnosis. About 30 years ago Echo Heron published Intensive Care, about her stint as a nurse, along with Carol Gino’s The Nurse’s Story. Like many library patrons, I couldn’t get enough of these kinds of stories.”

GalleyChat, Aug. 1, Transcript

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

Click here for an Edelweiss catalog of the titles that were discussed at our most recent GalleyChat.

The next GalleyChat is on September 5th, the day after Labor Day (don’t get distracted by the holiday, put it on your calendars)

YA/MG Galley chat is on August 15. Details on joining each chat are here.