Archive for the ‘Awards’ Category

National Book Awards
Stream Live TONIGHT

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

UPDATE: NPR’s report on the National Book Awards is here.

Watch the National Book Awards, hosted by Cynthia Nixon, live tonight on the National Book Foundation’s site.

The event is scheduled to begin at 7:20 ET, when Bill Clinton presents the Literarian Award to Dick Robinson, CEO of Scholastic, followed by Anne Hathaway presenting Annie Proulx with the Foundation’s lifetime achievement award. After a break for dinner, the book awards get rolling around 9:20 pm.

To play along, download the ballot here.

Carnegie Finalists Announced

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

The finalists for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction were announced today, three titles each, down from longlists of 25 in fiction and 21 in nonfiction.

The winners will be announced at ALA Midwinter in Denver

Fiction

   

Jennifer Egan, Manhattan Beach, (S&S/Scribner)

LibraryReads selection, October

“Anna and her father Eddie arrive at the home of Dexter Styles on Manhattan Beach searching for a job during the Depression. After Eddie goes missing five years later, Anna supports her mother and sister by working at the Brooklyn Naval Yard. One night, Anna approaches Styles for information about her father. They become involved, but he is still marked by his past relationship with Eddie. Egan’s description of New York in the 30s and 40s is so immersive that you feel like you’re waking up when you have to put the book down.” — Barbara Birenbaum, Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, CA

Reviews, Book Marks, “Positive,” based on 31 reviews

George Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo, (PRH/Random House)

Winner of the Man Booker Prize

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave” based on 42 reviews

Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing, (S&S/Scribner)

National Book Awards, Shortlist

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave,” based on 27 reviews

 

Nonfiction

   

Sherman Alexie, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir, (Hachette/Little, Brown)

Reviews, Book Marks, “Positive,” based on 12 reviews

Daniel Ellsberg, The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner, (Macmillan/Bloomsbury)

Will not be released until December, but has already been reviewed by the following:

Salon, 10/6/17

Bill Moyers and Company, 10/17/17

Ellsberg will receive additional attention in December, with the release of Steven Spielberg’s film,The Post, about the Washington Post‘s decision to publish The Pentagon Papers, which were leaked by Ellsberg,

David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, (PRH/Doubleday)

National Book Awards shortlist

LibraryReads selection, April

“In the 1920s, a string of unsolved murders rocked the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. Made rich by oil rights, the Osage were already victimized by unscrupulous businessmen and societal prejudice, but these murders were so egregious, the newly formed FBI was brought in to investigate. Immensely readable, this book brings a shameful part of U.S. history alive and will keep readers thinking long after they have finished the book.” — Jenna Persick, Chester County Library, Exton, PA

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave,” based on 23 reviews

George Saunders Wins Man Booker

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

George Saunders’ novel Lincoln in the Bardo (PRH/RH; RH Audio/BOT), a number one best seller in the US, has won the Man Booker Prize. Saunders is the second American to win the British prize, following Paul Beatty’s The Sellout (Macmillan/FSG) last year. Americans only became eligible for the Prize  four years ago.

Back in March, Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman bought the film rights to the book. It has also had a virtual reality adaptation.

Man Booker To Be Announced Today

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017


The winner of the Man Booker Awards will be announced in London tonight, which will be mid- to late afternoon, Eastern time.

The Guardian sums up the odds for the six titles on the shortlist, “Man Booker prize 2017: Ali Smith leads sales, George Saunders ahead at bookies.

4 3 2 1,  Paul Auster, January 31, 2017, Macmillan/Henry Holt and Co.; Trade pbk, Picador, February 6, 2018

History of Wolves, Emily Fridlund, January 3, 2017, Atlantic Monthly Press; Trade pbk, Grove Press, November 7, 2017 — debut author

Exit West, Mohsin Hamid, Riverhead Books, March 7, 2017; Trade pbk, March 6, 2018

Elmet, Fiona Mozley, Workman/Algonquin, December 5, 2017, (ship date: November 8, 2017). A first novel, this one is considered a wild card.

Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders, February 14, 2017, Random House; Random House Trade Paperback, February 6, 2018

Autumn, Ali Smith, February 7, 2017, PRH/Pantheon; Trade pbk, PRH/Anchor, October 31, 2017

Nobel in Lit Goes to Ishiguro

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

Long considered a contender, Kazuo Ishiguro, the Japanese-British author of The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, has won this year’s Nobel Prize in Literature.

National Book Awards, The 2017 Fiction Longlist

Friday, September 15th, 2017

The longlist of ten titles for the National Book Awards in fiction was announced today.

Of the ten, eight of the books are by women. The L.A. Times notes this is “the first time since the National Book Foundation started using longlists in 2013 that women have appeared in such a majority.”

This is the culmination of longlist announcements. The longlists for nonfiction, poetry and young people’s literature are available on the National Book Foundation’s site.

Man Booker Shortlist, 2017

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

The shortlist for one of the most influential literary awards in the English language, the 2017 Man Booker Prize, was announced in London today. Surprisingly, the novel that has won the most awards to date, including the Pulitzer Prize, Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, did not make it to the shortlist. Several other big names also did not make the cut, Arundhati Roy, Sebastian Barry, and Zadie Smith.The Guardian declares the list “daring,” featuring novels that “reject conventional realism and celebrate precarious and unstable narratives,”

Half of the six titles are by authors from the U.S., as the New York Times notes in its headline.

The winner will be announced on Oct. 17.

4 3 2 1,  Paul Auster, January 31, 2017, Macmillan/Henry Holt and Co.; Trade pbk, Picador, February 6, 2018 — U.S.

History of Wolves, Emily Fridlund, January 3, 2017, Atlantic Monthly Press; Trade pbk, Grove Press, November 7, 2017 — U.S, debut author

Exit West, Mohsin Hamid, Riverhead Books, March 7, 2017; Trade pbk, March 6, 2018 — UK/Pakistan

Elmet, Fiona Mozley, No US publisher announced yet. UK publisher is Hodder & Stoughton — UK. A first novel, this one is considered a wild card. UPDATE: it is now set to be published by Workman/Algonquin, December 5, 2017, )ship Date: November 8, 2017) and to be released in audio by HighBridge Audio.

Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders, February 14, 2017, Random House; Random House Trade Paperback, February 6, 2018 — U.S.

Autumn, Ali Smith, February 7, 2017, PRH/Pantheon; Trade pbk, PRH/Anchor, October 31, 2017 — Scotland

Women Authors Rule Hugo Awards

Friday, August 11th, 2017

The best novel winner and nominees for the Hugo Award, announced today, below:

Winner — The Obelisk Gate, N. K. Jemisin, (Hachette/Orbit) — this is the second Hugo in a row for the author. She won for The Fifth Season (Hachette/Orbit) last year. They are the first two titles in a trilogy. The final, The Stone Sky, is set for release next week.

All the Birds in the Sky, Charlie Jane Anders, (Macmillan/Tor) — this won the Nebula this year

A Closed and Common Orbit, Becky Chambers, (HarperVoyager)

Death’s End, Cixin Liu, (Macmillan/Tor) — the author won the Hugo in 2015

Ninefox Gambit, Yoon Ha Lee, (S&S/Solaris)

Too Like the Lightning, Ada Palmer, (Macmillan/Tor)

Winners and nominees in all the other categories, here.

Booker 17 Longlist

Thursday, July 27th, 2017

The Booker longlist, announced today, is “thronged with literary titans, whose combined trophy cabinet would include the Pulitzer, the Costa, the Baileys, the Folio, the Impac and the Goldsmiths prizes,” notes the Guardian, but it also manages to squeeze in three debut novels.

Nine of the thirteen titles are available in the US, three are scheduled for release later this year. A fourth, Elmet by Fiona Mozley, does not yet have a US publisher.

Download a spreadsheet with US publication information here, Booker Longlist 2017.

2017 Booker International Prize

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Israeli author David Grossman has won the Man Booker International Prize, announced at a ceremony in London last night, for his novel, A Horse Walks Into a Bar, (PRH/Knopf; HighBridge Audio; OverDrive Sample; OverDrive Audio Sample). He shares the award with Jessica Cohen who translated the novel from Hebrew.

The award is given to books translated into English by the same British organization that awards the influential Man Booker Prize for Fiction awarded to novels originally written in English. That award will be announced  in October.

A review of the book in the Washington Post calls Grossman, “the distinguished, urbane author of 13 previous morally sensitive works of fiction and nonfiction,” a man quite different from the  “wild and coarse” main character of the novel, a “captivating and horrific [stand-up comic with] a routine that’s disgusting and authentically human.” The review also gives credit to the translator Jessica Cohen, for turning “the performance into fluent, American-style patter, bad-a-bing bad-a-boom.”

Dylan Pays the Ultimate Compliment

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017

Musicians are well-known for borrowing, but Dylan may have done more than that in his Nobel lecture, delivered last week via video. Questions were raised when author Ben Greenman pointed out on his blog that one of the quotes Dylan attributes to Melville’s Moby Dick does not actually appear in that book. Further investigation by Andrea Pitzer on Slate reveals that quote and several other comments in the lecture are very similar to text in the SparkNotes ABOUT Moby Dick.

The press is having a field day with the story. ABC News quotes a Dylan lyric for their headline, “Was Dylan too freewheelin’ in borrowing for Nobel lecture?” Vanity Fair suggests that there may be more to it,  asking, “Is Bob Dylan Still Messing with the Swedish Academy?”

A Bookish Tony Awards

Monday, June 12th, 2017

The 71st annual Tony Awards were announced last night. It came as no surprise that Dear Evan Hansen won big, talking home Best Musical, Best Actor in a Musical, Best Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical, Best Orchestrations, Best Book of a Musical, and Best Original Score Written for a Musical.

What might be a surprise is how very bookish the evening was as many of the shows have either been published in book form, were already available as print plays, or are based on other books.

Rising on Amazon’s rankings, jumping from #1,868 to #128 is the book Dear Evan Hansen by Steven Levenson, composed by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (Consortium Book Sales/Theatre Communications Group).

Fans have more to look forward to. In November a book about the making of the play will be published, Dear Evan Hansen by Steven Levenson (Hachette/Grand Central, cover not yet finalized).

 

 

 

 

 

Hello, Dolly!, which netted Bette Midler the Tony for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical, is based on Thornton Wilder’s The Merchant of Yonkers (latter retitled The Matchmaker). It came out in a new edition this April, The Matchmaker: A Farce in Four Acts (HC/Harper Perennial; OverDrive Sample).

The Best Play winner, Oslo, has been published in book form: Oslo by J.T. Rogers (Consortium Book Sales/Theatre Communications Group), while the Best Revival of a Play, August Wilson’s Jitney, has a tie-in edition, Jitney: A Play – Broadway Tie-In Edition by August Wilson (The Overlook Press; OverDrive Sample).

Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812, which won 2 Tony awards, is based on a section of Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace. That section is out in Ebook format: Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812 from War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy with a forward by the composer Dave Malloy (PRH/Vintage; OverDrive Sample). There is also a “making of” book, The Great Comet: The Journey of a New Musical to Broadway edited by Steven Suskin with notes by Dave Malloy (Sterling).

While not released in book form itself, Doll’s House 2 picks up where Henrik Ibsen’s famous play left off.

Other winners in book form include Indecent, Play That Goes Wrong, The Little Foxes, and Present Laughter.

Horn Book Award Winners

Monday, June 12th, 2017

The winners of the 2017 Horn Book – Boston Globe Awards were announced on May 31 during SLJ‘s Day of Dialog. The awards will be presented aceremony on Friday, October 6, 2017, at Boston’s Simmons College. A winner and two honor books are selected in each of three categories: Fiction and Poetry, Picture Book, and Nonfiction.

The Fiction and Poetry winner has become a key talking point and cultural phenomenon as well as a best seller. This is the first of many awards it is likely to win (titles published in the first half of 2017 are eligible for the Horn Book – Boston Globe Awards). It has already been selected as one of the best books of the year so far by the Washington Post and Entertainment Weekly. It is also set for a film adaptation starring Amandla Stenberg.

FICTION AND POETRY AWARD WINNER

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (HC/Balzer + Bray; HarperAudio; OverDrive Sample).

Horn Book writes:

“Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter lives a life many African American teenagers can relate to: a life of double consciousness. Caught between her rough, predominantly black neighborhood and the “proper,” predominantly white prep school she attends, Starr has learned how to “speak with two different voices and only say certain things around certain people.” This precarious balance is broken when Starr witnesses the shooting of her (unarmed) childhood friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. What follows is a gut-wrenching chain of events that alters all Starr holds dear … Thomas has penned a powerful, in-your-face novel.”

Honor winners are One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance written by Nikki Grimes, illustrated by various artists (Macmillan/Bloomsbury Publishing; OverDrive Sample) and The Best Man by Richard Peck (PRH/Dial Books for Young Readers; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample).

PICTURE BOOK AWARD WINNER

Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan (S&S/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books/Atheneum Books for Young Readers; OverDrive Sample).

Horn Book says:

“A historical document dated July 5, 1828, lists the property to be sold from the Fairchilds’ estate. Hogs. Cattle. A handmill. Men. Women. Children. While no information beyond the gender and name — and price — of each of the eleven enslaved people is noted in the appraisal of the estate, Bryan lovingly restores their humanity and dignity, giving them ages, true African names, relationships, talents, hopes, and dreams … Bryan’s art is just as intentional. Facsimiles of the historical document serve as background for each slave’s introduction page, portraits of their faces taking precedence as they gaze out at the reader.”

Earlier, it was named a Newbery Honor Book , a Coretta Scott King (Author) Honor Book and a Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Honor Book.

Honor winners are Wolf in the Snow by Matthew Cordell (Macmillan/Feiwel & Friends; OverDrive Sample) and Town Is by the Sea by Joanne Schwartz, illustrated by Sydney Smith (Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press).

NONFICTION AWARD WINNER

Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers by Deborah Heiligman (Macmillan/Henry Holt; Dreamscape Audio; OverDrive Sample).

The Horn Book review says:

“After vividly setting the stage with brief sections that introduce Vincent and Theo near the end of their lives, Heiligman takes readers back to their beginnings. We learn of other siblings and of supportive parents; we gain a sense of their childhoods in their father’s parsonage. Structured as a walk through an art museum, the book proceeds through the years, each section a gallery … Heiligman mostly employs a present-tense, purposely staccato narration that effectively heightens the brothers’ emotional intensity, their sufferings and pleasures (physical, emotional, intellectual, aesthetic, and spiritual), and, most of all, Vincent’s wild and original art. The layout, which incorporates sketches, subheads, and a generous use of white space, is a calming counterpoint to the turbulent narrative … The result is a unique and riveting exploration of art, artists, and brotherly love.”

It was a National Book Award finalist.

Honor winners are Undefeated: Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School Football Team by Steve Sheinkin (Macmillan/Roaring Brook Press; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample) and Some Writer!: The Story of E. B. White by Melissa Sweet (HMH Books for Young Readers; OverDrive Sample).

The presentation video is online.

The judging panel included Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library (chair), Pauletta B. Bracy, North Carolina Central University, Durham, North Carolina; and Sheila M. Geraty, Brookwood School, Manchester, Massachusetts.

Feminist Sci Fi Wins Bailey’s Prize

Thursday, June 8th, 2017

Called an “amazing dystopian novel, a brilliant meditation on ‘What if women had all the power?’,” British author Naomi Alderman’s fourth novel The Power has won the 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. It will be published in the US in October by Hachette/Little, Brown.

The power of the book’s title is literal. Teen aged girls are given the ability to electrify, shock and even kill, making men terrified of them. In her acceptance speech, Alderman celebrated another sort of power, “the support … of other women [which] has meant more than electricity to me.”

The cover features a blurb from Margaret Atwood, “Electrifying! Shocking! Will knock your socks off! Then you’ll think twice, about everything.” The two authors are mutual admirers. As part of mentoring program set up by Rolex, the pair co-authored a zombie novel on Wattpad titled The Happy Zombie Sunrise Home.

On the eve of the launch of the TV adaptation of Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Alderman explored the history of feminist science fiction for the Guardian, dating the first example to Margaret Cavendish’s 1666 book The Blazing World.

Alderman, who was  has written online games for Penguin, the BBC and others told the Evening Standard that she would love to turn The Power into an online game.  She is already working on an adaptation of the book for television.

An adaptation of the author’s first book Disobedience, a best seller in the UK, is currently in post-production starring Rachel Weisz, Rachel McAdams and Alessandro Nivola.

Bob Dylan’s Nobel Lecture

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

When Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize in Literature last year, part of the requirement for receiving the award, as well as the $900,000 that comes with it, was to deliver a speech within six months. Cutting it close, Dylan has delivered, just days shy of the June 10 deadline, leading the Guardian to quote one of his songs in their headline, “Bob Dylan delivers ‘extraordinary’ Nobel lecture – in the nick of time.”

Like many others, he wonders why he is the first songwriter to be chosen for this award, saying, “When I first received this Nobel prize for literature, I got to wondering exactly how my songs related to literature.”  He goes on to talk about the books that have influenced him, particularly Moby-Dick, All Quiet on the Western Front, and The Odyssey. Weaving those reading experiences into the speech, he says their themes are fundamental to his lyrics and that reading them helped shape his character and outlook.

He ends by saying:

“Our songs are alive in the land of the living. But songs are unlike literature. They’re meant to be sung, not read. The words in Shakespeare’s plays were meant to be acted on the stage. Just as lyrics in songs are meant to be sung, not read on a page. And I hope some of you get the chance to listen to these lyrics the way they were intended to be heard: in concert or on record or however people are listening to songs these days. I return once again to Homer, who says, “Sing in me, oh Muse, and through me tell the story.”

Sara Danius, the Swedish Academy’s permanent secretary wrote on the Nobel blog, “The speech is extraordinary and, as one might expect, eloquent. Now that the Lecture has been delivered, the Dylan adventure is coming to a close.”

The same post reports that in April of this year, “the members of the Academy met with Bob Dylan in Stockholm to present him with the gold medal and the diploma.”

In December, Dylan provided a thank-you speech delivered at the Nobel Banquet by the former U.S. ambassador to Sweden. See our earlier post for the story and video.

He is the first songwriter to win the award and was honored for “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.”