Archive for June, 2018

LibraryReads, July List

Friday, June 15th, 2018

Just in time to load your reading devices for the weekend, the July LibraryRead list has arrived. All titles are available as DRCs on Edelweiss or on NetGalley (see notes on our spreadsheet, LibraryReads, July).

The list’s debut titles were GalleyChat favorites:

   


Fruit of the Drunken Tree
, Ingrid Rojas Contreras, (PRH/Random House/Doubleday),

Skillyfully intertwining recent Colombian history with a coming of age story, GalleyChatters describe this as a “… beautiful, enthralling novel … Full of impossible situations and undesirable choices… truly is a must read.” The author’s essay, “On Not Writing For White People” gives insight into the difficulty of bridging cultures and languages. In another essay, she writes about a chilling irony, “I Became An American The Day Trump Made His ‘Shithole Countries’ Comment.”

Dear Mrs. Bird, AJ Pearce, (S&S/Scribner)

The Irish Times calls it “Bridget Jones of the Blitz: AJ Pearce’s happy war story.” On GalleyChat, it was described as, “Historical fiction that’s charming and fun and easy to recommend” and  “perfect for fans of Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society. The author is profiled in the Guardian‘s “Meet the new faces of fiction for 2018.

Baby Teeth, Zoje Stage,(Macmillan/ St. Martin’s)

GalleyChatters call this story of a little girl who wants to kill her mother “creepy” and “memorable.” Kaite Stover may have come up with the ultimate description, “think Children of the Artisinal Organically-Farmed Corn.”

The author was featured on Library Jounal’s April cover and on the Book Expo Thriller Panel, but as she describes on her blog, she nearly gave up her dreams of becoming an author. Until she becomes a household name, Macmillan Library Marketing tells us her first name is pronounced “Zoh-yeh” not “Zoh-gee.”

Note the cover’s clever variation on the “exploding flower” image used on Liane Moriarty’s The Husband’s Secret. (another variation is the “spontaneously combusting flower” on Meg Abbot’s Give Me Your Hand, also on this month’s LibraryReads list).

Diversity on Summer Reading Lists

Thursday, June 14th, 2018

Many of this year’s summer book lists include titles we’ve been tracking on our list of Diversity Titles, Upcoming, LibraryReads ConsiderationEntertainment Weekly gets specific, recommending “7 inclusive novels that will make you think,

Several August titles (LibraryReads nominations due next Wednesday, June 20), receive attention:

River of Stars, Vanessa Hua, (PRH/Ballantine Books); DRC, Edelweiss and NetGalley

Debut. A GalleyChat favorite, this title appears on multiple summer reading lists, including EW‘s “7 inclusive novels that will make you think.”  In 5 Great Debut Novels to Help Get You Through This Summer, the Voice describes it as,  ” … a 21st-century immigrant story about the terror, drama, and desperation of being undocumented and yet unable to leave.”

Severance, Ling Ma, (Macmillan/FSG); DRC NetGalley

Debut. NY magazine’s Vulture writes in 18 Books We Can’t Wait to Read This Summer, “this phenomenal debut explores what happens when we make any number of decisions by rote and fail to see or question the bigger picture.” Adds BuzzFeed in “30 Summer Books To Get Excited About, “Ma’s language does so much in this book, and its precision, its purposeful specificity, implicates an entire generation.”

How Are You Going To Save Yourself, JM Holmes, (Hachette/Little, Brown); DRC NetGalley

Debut. Entertainment Weekly, 7 inclusive novels that will make you think, “follows the lives of four friends as they drift apart and come back together, navigating adulthood as black men living with traumatic legacies who have been offered very different fortunes as they come of age. Holmes’ searing study in masculinity is offset by irresistible heart and biting humor. ”

Praise Song for the Butterflies, Bernice L. McFadden (Akashic, August), Original; DRC, Edelweiss

Philadelphia Inquirer, Summer books, “A tale set in Ghana, where a girl is given up by her family, endures a very hard life, and, once set free, must find a way to heal and live forward.”  McFadden is the author of 8 books, her previous, The Book Of Harlan, won the 2017 American Book Award, the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work (Fiction) and was named a Washington Post Notable Book of 2016.

Praise Song for Butterflies is also mentioned in the new issue of Vanity Fair, which debuts a real books section, replacing the old Hot Type column, with its dizzying run-on list of titles. The welcome change is no surprise. The magazine’s new editor, Radhika Jones, was formerly at the NYT Book Review. Featured in the new issue’s book section is a profile of the owners of the “Trailblazing Black-Owned Bookstore,” D.C.’s Mahogany. Their favorite upcoming title is McFadden’s.

The Air You Breathe, Frances de Pontes Peebles, (PRH/Riverhead); DRC Edelweiss and NetGalley

Philadelphia Inquirer, Summer books, — “The long friendship between Dores and Graça is forged through music. Based partly on the life of Carmen Miranda, this novel takes us from 1920 Brazilian sugar plantations to the urban samba scene of the 1930s.” Previous title, The Seamstress.

Asghar, Fatimah, If They Come for Us , (PRH/Random House/One World, August). Pbk. Original; DRC, Edelweiss and NetGalley

The Philadelphia Inquirer notes, “Asghar, co-creator of the web/HBO series Brown Girls, writes through the eyes of a Pakistani woman who comes to America and discovers a very strange country indeed.”

Reading Ahead with GalleyChat

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018

Last week, GalleyChatting librarians tipped their favorite upcoming titles during the #ewgc chat. Scroll through the tweets to sit in on a great RA discussion. Speaking of great RA conversations, GalleyChatter Robin Beerbower has started a blog. Her newest post, “Sandy Covers,” highlights her favorite new Beach Reads, and, for upcoming titles, also gives “while you wait” suggestions.

All 192 of the GalleyChat titles are listed in the following:

 Edelweiss catalog here, includes links to downloadable DRC’s.

GalleyChat Titles, June 2018— Downloadable spreadsheet, for ordering purposes. We didn’t include the tweets this time. If you want to know more about a particular title, search it along with #ewgc on Twitter.

The next LibraryReads voting deadline, for titles to be published in August, is a week from tomorrow, Wednesday, June 20th. Check the GalleyChat list for potential nominations as well as our EarlyWord “Diverse Titles for LibraryReads Consideration,

Join us for the next GalleyChat on Tues., July 10, 4 to 5 pm ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails) and don’t forget YA/MG GalleyChat this coming Thurs., June 14th, 2:30 to 3:30. Details on each here. Bring a friend!

Notes from June’s GalleyChat:

— Patterson and Clinton may be getting attention for The President Is Missing, but GalleyChatters say you should keep your eye out for Hope Never Dies: An Obama Biden Mystery by Andrew Shaffer, coming in July from the well-named publishing house, Quirk Books.

— GalleyChatters are stalking advance readers copies of the recently announced new Liane Moriarty title, Nine Perfect Strangers, to be published in November. No news yet on when ARC’s will be availble, but the following much-stalked titles appeared recently:

Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen, An Anonymous Girl 

Kate Atkinson, Transcription

Louise Penny, Kingdom of the Blind

— Excitement continues for The Silent Patient by screenwriter Alex Michaelides. It’s being compared to a previous GalleyChat favorite, Woman In The Window, and, like that book, this debut is building buzz months ahead of its February pub. date. GalleyChatters are already casting the movie and, given the author’s film industry connections, it would not be surprising if it goes that route. The DRC is on NetGalley.

— Another debut that has been getting GalleyChat attention for months is Vox by Christina Dalcher, coming in August. Gregg Winsor tweeted his Book Expo Shout ‘n’ Share recommendation, “A near-future dystopia where women are limited to speaking just 100 words. The comparisons to THE HANDSMAID’S TALE are very much accurate and – pardon the pun – this will give your book club tons to talk about.”

The book’s author, Christina Dalcher joined the chat to make her own recommendation, saying she “just devoured Elliot Ackerman’s Waiting for Eden, after meeting him at the PRH breakfast. Can’t stop thinking about this one.” That comment was echoed by other Chatters.

— Several August titles from our EarlyWord “Diverse Titles for LibraryReads Consideration,” received GalleyChat recs (LibraryReads voting deadline, June 20).

      

Before She Sleeps, Bina Shah — Add this to the list of titles being compared to The Handmaid’s Tale, a growing category dubbed by “womb dystopia” by some. GalleyChatter Susan Maguire tweeted. “… just in case anyone has patrons who liked THE HANDMAID’S TALE, there’s BEFORE SHE SLEEPS by Bina Shah that is the feminist dystopia we don’t deserve, but it is also the feminist dystopia we are going to get.” “PW calls it a “haunting dystopian thriller from Pakistani author Shah”

Temper, Nicky Drayden — Jenna Friebel, “Do y’all remember how much I raved about her debut, The Prey of Gods? This one is just as inventive.”

A River of Stars, Vanessa Hua — GalleyChat, “about a Chinese woman who makes her way to California to give her baby U.S. citizenship, blurbed by Celeste Ng” — “Vanessa Hua’s debut is an utterly absorbing novel.” — LJ PrePub Alert, “A columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle and author of the glowingly reviewed small-press debut collection DECEIT AND OTHER POSSIBILITIES, Hua claims multiple awards …”

Hollywood Ending, Kellye Garrett, DRC available on Netgalley — GalleyChat, “Dayna Anderson uses her connections as a former actress to solve a murder in HOLLYWOOD ENDING by @kellyekell. Smart, sassy mystery that keeps you guessing to the end”. — “This series is so fun! A great take on the LA noir tone.” — It’s the second in a mystery series featuring an African/American female detective. The first, Hollywood Homicide just won an Anthony and a Lefty