Carnegie Finalists Announced

The finalists for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction were announced today, three titles each, down from longlists of 25 in fiction and 21 in nonfiction.

The winners will be announced at ALA Midwinter in Denver

Fiction

   

Jennifer Egan, Manhattan Beach, (S&S/Scribner)

LibraryReads selection, October

“Anna and her father Eddie arrive at the home of Dexter Styles on Manhattan Beach searching for a job during the Depression. After Eddie goes missing five years later, Anna supports her mother and sister by working at the Brooklyn Naval Yard. One night, Anna approaches Styles for information about her father. They become involved, but he is still marked by his past relationship with Eddie. Egan’s description of New York in the 30s and 40s is so immersive that you feel like you’re waking up when you have to put the book down.” — Barbara Birenbaum, Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, CA

Reviews, Book Marks, “Positive,” based on 31 reviews

George Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo, (PRH/Random House)

Winner of the Man Booker Prize

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave” based on 42 reviews

Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing, (S&S/Scribner)

National Book Awards, Shortlist

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave,” based on 27 reviews

 

Nonfiction

   

Sherman Alexie, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir, (Hachette/Little, Brown)

Reviews, Book Marks, “Positive,” based on 12 reviews

Daniel Ellsberg, The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner, (Macmillan/Bloomsbury)

Will not be released until December, but has already been reviewed by the following:

Salon, 10/6/17

Bill Moyers and Company, 10/17/17

Ellsberg will receive additional attention in December, with the release of Steven Spielberg’s film,The Post, about the Washington Post‘s decision to publish The Pentagon Papers, which were leaked by Ellsberg,

David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, (PRH/Doubleday)

National Book Awards shortlist

LibraryReads selection, April

“In the 1920s, a string of unsolved murders rocked the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. Made rich by oil rights, the Osage were already victimized by unscrupulous businessmen and societal prejudice, but these murders were so egregious, the newly formed FBI was brought in to investigate. Immensely readable, this book brings a shameful part of U.S. history alive and will keep readers thinking long after they have finished the book.” — Jenna Persick, Chester County Library, Exton, PA

Reviews, Book Marks, “Rave,” based on 23 reviews

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