Towards a More Diverse LibraryReads

UPDATE: Just added, the Penguin Random House diversity catalog.

A recent story on Book Riot pointed out a lack of diversity among the LibraryReads picks. To help librarians discover titles by a wider range of authors, we asked library marketers at the various publishing houses to put together what we call, for the lack of a better term, “diversity catalogs” of titles eligible for LibraryReads nominations. We have posted the ones we’ve received so far in the links at the right and will add more as we receive them.

What better time than the Fourth of July holiday to celebrate diversity? Highlighted below are titles available to download now and one to request:

  

The City of Brass, S A. Chakrabortty, (HarperCollins/ Harper Voyager)

A debut fantasy that interweaves aspects of Muslim culture. HarperCollins Voyager imprint is one to look to, as they declare themselves “committed to introducing a new wave of diverse voices and intriguing stories that push the boundaries of science fiction and fantasy for the 21st century.”  Listen to the Book Buzz description here. See the full HarperCollins diversity catalog here.

The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao, Martha Batalha, translated by Eric M. B. Becker (Oneworld Publications, dist. by IPG)

Originally published in Brazil, it is described by the publisher as “A darkly comic portrait of two rebellious sisters in 1940s Rio de Janeiro that illuminates contemporary issues of feminism and domestic equality. ” It is published by independent publisher Oneworld Publications, which focuses on “diverse cultures and historical events.” Recently profiled in the Guardian, the 30-year-old company is based in Oxford, U.K., and opened offices in New York in 2009. Its titles are distributed in the US via Publishers Group West [Note: this is a correction. Previously, we incorrectly identified the distributor as IPG]. See the full IPG/PGW diversity catalog here.

Real American: A Memoir, Julie Lythcott-Haims, (Macmillan/Holt)

Called a “bold, impassioned memoir that explores the emotional and cultural divide imposed by American racism on people of mixed race” by Publishers Weekly, this is by the author of the best-selling anti-helicopter parenting book, How to Raise an Adult. Full Macmillan diversity catalog here.

Dogs at the Perimeter, Madeleine Thien, (Norton, Original Trade Pbk; Recorded Books)

Chinese-Canadian Thien’s novel Do Not Say We Have Nothing (Norton; Recorded Books; OverDrive Sample) was a finalist for the Man Booker and swept Canada’s literary awards. This, her third novel, available for the first time in the U.S., is about Cambodian refugees dealing with past traumas. It received strong reviews when it was published in the UK in 2012, including The Economist, which noted, “The strife in Indo-China has inspired some astonishing writing in recent decades, both fiction and non-fiction. Dogs at the Perimeter belongs with the best of such works.” Like the other titles in the Norton diversity catalog, it is available by request.

We’re Going To Need More Wine, Gabrielle Union, (HarperCollins/Dey Street).

We mentioned this collection of essays by the actress and activist in our earlier post, noting her heartfelt tribute to libraries during a panel at Book Expo.

It’s now available to download.

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