Archive for July, 2017

YA/MG GalleyChat,Tues. July 18

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

Today’s YA/MG GalleyChat has now ended. We will publish a transcript shortly.

Join us for the next chat on Tuesday, August 15, 4 to 5 pm (3:30 for virtual cocktails. Virgin, of course). Details here.

GalleyChat, Tues. July 11

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

Please join us for the next GalleyChat, Tuesday, August 1, 4 to 5 p.m., ET (3:30 for virtual cocktails!)

More info on how to join here.

Below is an edited transcript of the chat:

A Word from EarlyWord

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

UPDATE: Thanks for the wonderful comments and best wishes. We are thrilled and humbled. 

This is our final EarlyWord post. Over the last nine years, we have enjoyed your support and enthusiasm for EarlyWord.com.

We will continue the EarlyWord GalleyChats and invite you to join us for the Adult chat on Tuesday, July 11th and the YA/Middle Grade chat on July 18th.

We have dozens of people to thank for EarlyWord‘s existence, most importantly, our readers. You dazzle us every day with your dedication to helping people discover books and become lifelong readers.

EarlyWord could not have gotten off the ground without our co-founder and “spiritual guru,” Fred Ciporen. Thanks to you, Chris Kahn for helping our advertisers craft creative and meaningful promotions. Thanks to Robin Beerbower and all the GalleyChatters for spotting forthcoming titles we should all read. You’ve had an amazing track record in putting the “early” into EarlyWord. Also thanks to kids contributors Lisa Von Drasek and to JoAnn Jonas, who enthusiastically moderated over 40 chats with middle-grade and YA authors. Our web designer, Chris Andreola of adcSTUDIO created a site that pleases us each time we look at it, which is saying a lot, considering how many times a day we go to it.

A special thanks to the library marketers at the publishing companies that have supported us. It’s been a joy to get to know you and I hope we have served our mission as the “Publisher Librarian Connection.”

As I’ve said many times before, “Keep on Reading!”

Nora

Nora Rawlinson
Co-Founder and Editor

Towards a More Diverse LibraryReads

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

UPDATE: Just added, the Penguin Random House diversity catalog.

A recent story on Book Riot pointed out a lack of diversity among the LibraryReads picks. To help librarians discover titles by a wider range of authors, we asked library marketers at the various publishing houses to put together what we call, for the lack of a better term, “diversity catalogs” of titles eligible for LibraryReads nominations. We have posted the ones we’ve received so far in the links at the right and will add more as we receive them.

What better time than the Fourth of July holiday to celebrate diversity? Highlighted below are titles available to download now and one to request:

  

The City of Brass, S A. Chakrabortty, (HarperCollins/ Harper Voyager)

A debut fantasy that interweaves aspects of Muslim culture. HarperCollins Voyager imprint is one to look to, as they declare themselves “committed to introducing a new wave of diverse voices and intriguing stories that push the boundaries of science fiction and fantasy for the 21st century.”  Listen to the Book Buzz description here. See the full HarperCollins diversity catalog here.

The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao, Martha Batalha, translated by Eric M. B. Becker (Oneworld Publications, dist. by IPG)

Originally published in Brazil, it is described by the publisher as “A darkly comic portrait of two rebellious sisters in 1940s Rio de Janeiro that illuminates contemporary issues of feminism and domestic equality. ” It is published by independent publisher Oneworld Publications, which focuses on “diverse cultures and historical events.” Recently profiled in the Guardian, the 30-year-old company is based in Oxford, U.K., and opened offices in New York in 2009. Its titles are distributed in the US via Publishers Group West [Note: this is a correction. Previously, we incorrectly identified the distributor as IPG]. See the full IPG/PGW diversity catalog here.

Real American: A Memoir, Julie Lythcott-Haims, (Macmillan/Holt)

Called a “bold, impassioned memoir that explores the emotional and cultural divide imposed by American racism on people of mixed race” by Publishers Weekly, this is by the author of the best-selling anti-helicopter parenting book, How to Raise an Adult. Full Macmillan diversity catalog here.

Dogs at the Perimeter, Madeleine Thien, (Norton, Original Trade Pbk; Recorded Books)

Chinese-Canadian Thien’s novel Do Not Say We Have Nothing (Norton; Recorded Books; OverDrive Sample) was a finalist for the Man Booker and swept Canada’s literary awards. This, her third novel, available for the first time in the U.S., is about Cambodian refugees dealing with past traumas. It received strong reviews when it was published in the UK in 2012, including The Economist, which noted, “The strife in Indo-China has inspired some astonishing writing in recent decades, both fiction and non-fiction. Dogs at the Perimeter belongs with the best of such works.” Like the other titles in the Norton diversity catalog, it is available by request.

We’re Going To Need More Wine, Gabrielle Union, (HarperCollins/Dey Street).

We mentioned this collection of essays by the actress and activist in our earlier post, noting her heartfelt tribute to libraries during a panel at Book Expo.

It’s now available to download.

Hitting Screens, Week of July 3, 2017

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

Only one film opens this week but it is expected to be a blockbuster, Spider-Man: Homecoming.

Fans of the Captain America: Civil War movie already got a look at the new Spidey played by Tom Holland; he stole every scene he was in.

Now Holland gets his own film, one The Verge describes as “a joyous celebration, not just of the MCU’s [Marvel Comic Universe] usual crowd-winning balance of humor and action, but of a little guy’s ability to make a difference, even when, for once, the fate of the world isn’t on the line.”

Reviews are generally strong. Vanity Fair says it is a film of “easy, abounding charm” that makes viewers want even more to follow. The Guardian calls it a “razor-sharp reboot” and “a crowd-pleasing triumph.” io9 says it is “great” and USA Today calls it “remarkable and refreshing.”

Not all the reviews are glowing but most acknowledge its pleasures. Entertainment Weekly, in its B+ review, says “Homecoming comes off as loose and sweet and light on its feet.” The NYT says it is “likable, amusing.” Most critical, The Hollywood Reporter writes it is “occasionally exciting but often frustrating … a creative misstep for the studio.”

There have been five previous films since 2002, each making less money than the one before. Marvel clearly hopes this is the reboot that puts the character and the franchise back on track. Polygon reports that the film launches a trilogy. The next stand-alone feature will be July 5, 2019. Before that the webbed crusader will appear in Avengers: Infinity War.

Spider-Man: Homecoming premieres July 7th. It stars Holland along with Michael Keaton, Jon Favreau, Zendaya, Donald Glover, Tyne Daly, Marisa Tomei, and Robert Downey Jr. Several tie-ins are out, see our posts here and here.

THE WINDFALL: Getting Attention

Sunday, July 2nd, 2017

Diksha Basu’s debut novel, The Windfall (PRH/Crown; RH Audio/BOT; OverDrive Sample) is attracting notable attention.

TV rights were optioned in March, reports Deadline Hollywood and now that it is has been published, the NYT covers the author twice. Taking a break from her nonfiction duties, NYT reviewer Jennifer Senior writes the novel tells “a story that’s the stuff of Amartya Sen’s worst nightmares and Tom Wolfe’s sweetest dreams.” The paper also has a feature on the Basu’s “Sunday Routine.

As part of its “Culture Index” RollingStone says it is one of the “Seven things you should check out this week.” HuffPost lists it as one of “12 Great New Books To Bring To The Beach This Summer” while Bustle names it one of “15 Uplifting Books That Will Soothe Your Soul In Dark Times.” Elle reviews, writing “The Windfall explores the effects of generational, gender, and class differences. Through her detailed descriptions of family meals, dusty floors, and ostentatious outfits, Basu gives us a full snapshot of a community’s life in contemporary India.”

PW stars, calling it a “charming, funny debut.” It is a July Indie Next pick.

NPR interviews the author on Weekend Edition Sunday, calling her novel “a delightful comedy of errors where [the characters] navigate the unexpected pressures and pleasures of newfound wealth in modern India.”

The Breakfast Club Meets Murder Mystery

Sunday, July 2nd, 2017

Making its debut at No.5 on the NYT Young Adult Hardcover list this week is One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus (PRH/Delacorte Press; Listening Library; OverDrive Sample),

Calling it “The Breakfast Club meets murder mystery,” Entertainment Weekly gives it a B+ and says “McManus knows how to plot out a mystery, but the real charm of the novel lies in the journey each of the characters goes on … [a] pretty stellar summer read.”

Kirkus says the “fast-paced blend of Gossip Girl, Pretty Little Liars, and classic John Hughes will leave readers racing to the finish as they try to unravel the mystery on their own.”

It has made a number of lists.

Seventeen names it “20 of the Best YA Books of 2017.”

Entertainment Weekly puts it on three of their lists:

Bustle lists it three times as well:

Holds at most libraries we checked are topping 3:1.