Hitting Screens, Week of June 19, 2017

There are no film adaptations opening this week but four TV series based on books premiere.

Grantchester returned yesterday for season three on PBS Masterpiece.

James Norton (Happy Valley) stars as vicar Sidney Chambers with Robson Green playing Inspector Geordie Keating. The two get caught up in even more mysteries as Sidney must decide if he will follow his heart with his long lost love or follow his church and abide by his moral calling.

The newest book in the series was published in May, Sidney Chambers and the Persistence of Love by James Runcie (Macmillan/Bloomsbury USA; also in trade paperback; OverDrive Sample). It is stickered to connect it to the PBS series although it is not a direct tie-in to the new season.

Queen Sugar premieres on Tuesday, June 20.

See our earlier post for full details, and note there is a tie-in:

Queen Sugar: A Novel (TV Tie-In), Natalie Baszile (PRH/Penguin; OverDrive Sample).

The TV adaptation of Stephen King’s novella The Mist debuts on Spike TV on June 22. It details the terror that grips a community when a strange vapor invades a small town.

The story is contained in the new edition of Skeleton Crew: Stories by Stephen King (S&S/Pocket; S&S Audio; OverDrive Sample).

The Washington Post includes it on their rundown of “Summer TV 2017,” giving it a C+ and calling it “a 10-episode Walking Dead-type survival of the fittest.”

Entertainment Weekly offers insights into the newest creepfest of a trailer.

Preacher returns to AMC for season 2 on June 25. It is based on the comic series of the same name by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon.

GQ calls the original an “iconic and maniacally violent comic book from the 1990s about faith and God and true love and the American dream,” but found the first season of the TV show “uneven” and the final episode “a bummer.” They offer several ways season two can be redeemed.

Entertainment Weekly was kinder, giving season one a B and writing “For all its frustrations, season 1 was always funny and always fun to watch.” The NYT was on board too, writing it “packs apocalypse, horror, religion, dirty realism and dime-store westerns into its glass jar, then sets the whole bloody mixture on purée.”

There is no direct tie-in. The comics ended in 2000 and have been published in trade paperback collections, hardcover editions, and most recently, expensive absolute editions (archival quality restored and recolored versions collecting an entire comic run in one or two volumes). Absolute Preacher Vol. 2 by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon (DC Comics/Vertigo) was just published, priced at $150.

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